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'epartment of 

ealth 111 



The City of New York 



for the 



Years 1911-1912 



N.T.C. VITAL ST^T. 
fiHNUAL REPUKT jjEPT. OF HLiiLTH: 


191191912. 




DATE 










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ANNUAL REPORT 



Board of Health 



OF THE 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 



OF 



THE CITY OF NEW YORK 




YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1912 



NEW YORK CITY 
1913 




4759-'14-l,000 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

Board of Health 5 

Officers of the Department of Health 6 

Honorary and Consulting Officers 7 

Medical Board of the Willard Parker and Riverside Hospitals 8 

Assistant Attending Physicians 9 

Letter of Transmittal io 

Report for the Year 1912 — 
General Administration : 

Reduction of the Death Rate n 

Reduction of Infant Mortality n 

Sanitary Control of the Milk Supply 12 

Infants' Milk Stations 13 

Supervision of Food 13 

Medical Inspection of School Children 14 

Typhoid Fever Inoculation 15 

Venereal Diseases 16 

Searches and Transcripts 17 

Contracts 17 

New Buildings 17 

Sale of Laboratory Products 18 

Financial Statement 19 

Legal Work 20 

General Sanitary Inspection: 

Stables 26 

Lodging Houses 26 

Smoke Nuisance 27 

Permits 27 

Transportation of Refuse 27 

Mosquito Prevention 27 

Work of Sanitary Police 28 

Food and Milk Inspection: 

Food Condemned in 1912 35 

Canned Goods 36 

Opium and Cocaine 36 

Wood Alcohol 3 6 

Table Waters 37 

Bakeries 37 

Eggs 37 

Oysters 37 

Cost of Inspection and Condemnation 38 

Sanitary Inspection Work 47 

Factories 47 

Slaughter Houses 48 

City Milk Inspection 5 2 

Enforcement of Grading 5 2 

Control of Stores 53 

Milk Containers 53 

Country Milk Inspection 56 

Pasteurization Plants 57 

3 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

Contagious Diseases: page 

Changes in Disinfection Procedure 60 

Tables 61 

Communicable Diseases: 

Tuberculosis 71 

Typhoid Fever 73 

Cerebrospinal Meningitis 73 

Acute Poliomyelitis 73 

Venereal Diseases 73 

Diphtheria Antitoxin 74 

Diagnosis Laboratory 74 

Child Hygiene: 

Supervision of Midwives 80 

Supervision of Foundlings 83 

Reduction of Infant Mortality 83 

Infants' Milk Stations 83 

District Visiting 86 

Cooperation 86 

Little Mothers' League 90 

Day Nurseries 90 

Institutions for Dependent Children 90 

Medical Inspection and Examination of School Children 91 

Issuance of Employment Certificates 97 

Hospitals: 

Otisville Sanatorium 105 

Laboratories : 

Trachoma Studies 108 

Serodiagnostic Laboratory 109 

Experimental Work 109 

Vaccine Laboratory no 

Vital Statistics: 

Population 113 

Births 115 

Marriages 116 

Deaths 117 

Life Table 117 

Death Rate 120 

Statistical Tables 125-262 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



Commissioner of Health and President of the Board, 
ERNST J. LEDERLE, PH. D. 



Health Officer of the Port, 

ALVAH H. DOTY, M. D To February 19, 1912. 

JOSEPH J. O'CONNELL, M, D Since February 19, 1912. 



Police Commissioner, 
RHINELANDER WALDO. 



OFFICERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

ERNST J. LEDERLE, PH. D., 
Commissioner of Health. 

HERMANN M. BIGGS, M. D., 
General Medical Officer. 

EUGENE W. SCHEFFER, 

Secretary. 

JAMES McC. MILLER, 
Chief Clerk. 

CURTIS E. LAKEMAN, 
Secretary to the Commissioner. 



Sanitary Bureau. 

WALTER BENSEL, M. D., 

Sanitary Superintendent. 

ALONZO BLAUVELT, M. D., 

Assistant Sanitary Superintendent, Manhattan. 

TRAVERSE R. MAXFIELD, M. D., 
Assistant Sanitary Superintendent, Brooklyn. 

marion b. McMillan, m. d., 

Assistant Sanitary Superintendent, The Bronx. 

JOHN H. BARRY, M. D., 

Assistant Sanitary Superintendent, Queens. 

JOHN T. SPRAGUE, M. D. 

Assistant Sanitary Superintendent, Richmond. 

JOHN S. BILLINGS, JR., M. D., 

Chief of the Division of Communicable Diseases 

RUSSELL RAYNOR, 

Chief of the Division of Food Inspection. 

S. JOSEPHINE BAKER, M. D., 

Director of Child Hygiene. 



Bureau of Records. 

WILLIAM H. GUILFOY, M. D. 
Registrar of Records. 

SHIRLEY J. WYNNE, M. D., 
Assistant Registrar of Records, Manhattan. 

SYLVESTER J. BYRNE, M. D., 
Assistant Registrar of Records, Brooklyn. 

ARTHUR J. O'LEARY, M. D., 
Assistant Registrar of Records, The Bronx. 

ROBERT CAMPBELL, M. D. 

Assistant Registrar of Records, Queens. 

FREDERICK S. WILLIAMS, M. D., 

Assistant Registrar of Records, Richmond. 



ROBERT J. WILSON, M. D., 

Superintendent of Hospitals. 

WILLIAM H. PARK, M. D., 

Director of Laboratories. 

6 



HONORARY AND CONSULTING OFFICERS. 



Medical Advisory Board. 

JOSEPH D. BRYANT, M. D. WILLIAM M. POLK, M. D. 

FRANCIS P. KINNICUTT, M. D. T. MITCHELL PRUDDEN, M. D. 

A. ALEXANDER SMITH, M. D. ABRAHAM JACOBI, M. D. 

L. EMMET HOLT, M. D. JOHN WINTERS BRANNAN, M. D. 

GLENTWORTH R. BUTLER, M. D. JOHN A. McCORKLE, M. D. 

WALTER B. JAMES, M. D. 



Honorary Consultants. 

CHARLES F. CHANDLER, PH. D Consulting Sanatarian. 

CLARENCE C. RICE, M. D Consulting Laryngologist.' 

GEORGE HENRY FOX, M. D Consulting Dermatologist. 

ROGER S. TRACY Consulting Statistician. 

DANIEL DRAPER, PH. D. Consulting Meteorologist. 

STEVENSON TOWLE Consulting Engineer. 

ARTHUR B. DUEL, M. D Consulting Otologist. 

IMON FLEXNER, M. D Consulting Pathologist. 



MEDICAL BOARD OF THE WILLARD PARKER AND 
RIVERSIDE HOSPITALS. 



JOHN WINTERS BRANNAN, M. D., President. 
HENRY W. BERG, M. D., Secretary. 

Ex-Officio Members. 
The Commissioner of Health. 
The General Medical Officer. 
The Sanitary Superintendent. 

The Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Hospital for Diphtheria 
and Scarlet |Fever. 

Consulting Physicians to the Willard Parker and Riverside Hospitals. 

JOHN WINTERS BRANNAN, M. D. WILLIAM P. NORTHRUP, M. D. 

ALBERT T. SWAN, M. D. 

Consulting Pathologist, 
SIMON FLEXNER, M. D. 

Consulting Otologists, 
ARTHUR B. DUEL, M. D. 

Attending Physicians to the Willard Parker Hospital. 

HENRY W. BERG, M. D. MATTHIAS NICOLL, JR., M. D. 

JOSEPH E. WINTERS, M. D. ALFRED F. HESS, M. D. 

LOUIS FISCHER, M. D. JOHN H. HUDDLESTON, M. D. 

HENRY D. CHAPIN, M. D. RUFUS P. COLE, M. D. 

ROYAL S. HAYNES, M. D. 

Attending Gynecologist, Attending Otologists, 

WILLIAM E. STUDDIFORD, M. D. PHILIP D. KERRISON, M. D. 

JOHN B. RAE, M. D. 

Attending Surgeon, Laryngologist and Intubator, 

THOMAS ALLISON SMITH, M. D. HENRY L. LYNAH, M. D. 

Bacteriologist, 
WILLIAM H. PARK, M. D. 

Attending Physicians to the Riverside Hospital. 

S. ADOLPHUS KNOPF, M. D. JOHN H. HUDDLESTON, M. D. 

WILLIAM JOSEPH PULLEY, M. D. BERTRAM H. WATERS, M. D. 

8 



ASSISTANT ATTENDING PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 



A ssistant A ttending Physicians, Willard Parker Hospital 



FREDERICK H. BARTLETT, M. D. 
B. RAYMOND HOOBLER, M. D. 
ELI LONG, M. D. 
PHILIP VAN INGEN, M. D. 
JAMES F. NAGEL, M. D. 
GODFREY R. PISEK, M. D. 
OSCAR M. SCHLOSS, M. D. 
JEROME S. LEOPOLD, M. D. 



JESSE GODFREY M. BULLOWA,!M. D. 
HENRY S. SATTERLEE, M. D. 
ARTHUR W. BINGHAM, M. D. 
FRANK S. FIELDER, M. D. 
GEORGE B. WALLACE, M. D. 
WILLIAM SHANNON, M. D. 
STANLEY BRADY, M. D. 



Assistant Attending Surgeons, Willard Parker Hospital. 
WALTER C. CRAMP, M. D. JOHN JOSEPH NUTT, M. D. 

CARL G. BURDICK, M. D. CHARLTON WALLACE, M. D. 



Assistant Attending Laryngologist, Riverside Hospital. 
ARTHUR J. HUEY, M. D. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, 

CITY OF NEW YORK, 

149 Centre Street, Borough of Manhattan. 



New York, November 21, 1913. 

To His Honor 

The Mayor of the City of New York: 
Sir: On behalf of the Board of Health I have the honor to transmit herewith, as 
required by Section 1168 of the Charter of the City of New York, a report of all the 
operations of the Department of Health of the City of New York for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1912. 

Very respectfully, 

ERNST J. LEDERLE, PH. D., 

Commissioner of Health. 



10 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 

A brief summary of some of the more important features of the work of the Depart- 
ment of Health during the year 1912 is given in this section of the report. The work of 
the various branches of the service is described more in detail in the following sections 
which embody the reports of the several bureaus and divisions. 

Reduction of Death Rate. 

It is very gratifying to be able to state that the record death rates of 1910 and 191 1 
were still further reduced in 19 12, in which year a new low record was established for 
New York City. The deaths recorded during 19 12 numbered 73,008, which gives a death 
rate of 14. 1 1 per one thousand. This is the lowest death rate the city has ever experienced, 
the next lowest being that of the year 191 1, when the rate was 15.13 per one thousand. 
The difference of 1.02 of a point between the two years compared may be interpreted to 
mean that had the death rate of 191 1 prevailed during the year 19 12 there would have 
been 5,276 more deaths than actually occurred. In analyzing the returns a decreased 
mortality will be found in the case of all the principal diseases which the Department 
of Health endeavors to control, namely, typhoid fever, measles, scarlet fever, smallpox, 
diphtheria, tuberculosis of the lungs and diarrhoeal diseases of children. On the other 
hand, the mortality from organic heart disease and Bright's disease will be found to be 
considerably increased, homicides slightly increased, while the deaths from cancer have 
remained stationary. 

Reduction of Infant Mortality. 

An excellent idea of the sanitary condition of the city may be obtained by studying 
the mortality of children under one year of age, percentages being based upon each 1,000 
births reported. During 1912, the number of births was 135,625. Using these figures as 
a basis, the rate was 105 deaths for each 1,000 children born. According to the figures 
published for England and Wales, which include both suburban and urban areas, the rate 
in 191 1 was 130 per 1,000. In Germany in 1910 the rate was 162, and in Berlin 157. 
It would seem from this that the mortality statistics of infants in New York City compare 
more than favorably with those of some European countries. 

During the summer months the nurses who are regularly on school duty were each 
placed in charge of 150 babies and required to visit them at home, teaching the mothers 
how to keep the babies well. In all, 22,417 babies were under the charge of these district 
nurses, in addition to those registered as under the care of the milk stations. Among this 
number there were 207 deaths. 

During the year 191 1 there had been a distinct decrease in the number of deaths under 
one year of age in New York City. This decrease was due in large part to the active cam- 
paign carried on by certain societies interested in the establishment of milk stations. 
During 1912 the Department of Health conducted the additional stations itself, two of the 
largest societies hitherto engaged in this work having discontinued their efforts. The total 
number of stations was not increased, yet, not only did the infant death rate remain at 
the low figure reached in 191 1, but there were fewer deaths of babies under one year of 
age than there were during 191 1. This is the lowest infant death rate recorded in the his- 

XI 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

tory of the city. The decrease in the infant mortality of New York City has been twice as 
great as the decrease in the remainder of the state. 

One of the most gratifying features of this reduction in the number of deaths from 
preventable causes has been the fact that the excessive infant mortality of summer has been 
reduced to a most marked degree. In former years there has been an abrupt increase in 
the number of deaths, which increase, commencing with almost unfailing regularity about 
the first of July, reached it maximum in midsummer, and then falling very slowly resumed 
a fairly normal level with the beginning of cold weather. 

During the summer of 191 1 this usual summer increase was not more than half as great 
as it had been in previous years, while the number of babies who died each week during 
the heated term of 19 12 was hardly any greater than the weekly average during the year. 



Sanitary Control of the Milk Supply. 

The most important single feature of the department's work in 1912 has been the 
improvement in the sanitary control of the milk supply. The past year has seen a notable 
measure of success in the actual application of comprehensive plans which have been 
under consideration and development for the past three years. Important and far-reach- 
ing improvements have been instituted by the grading of the milk supply and the exten- 
sion of pasteurization. 

System of Grading Milk. 

By the adoption of a resolution on January 4, 1912, the Board of Health required 
all milk brought into the city for sale to be sold under some one of the following grades 
or designations: 

Grade A . — Suitable for Infants and Children. 

(1) Certified Milk. 

(2) Guaranteed Milk. 

(3) Inspected Milk, Raw (from tuberculin-tested cows). 

(4) Selected Milk, Pasteurized. 

• 
Grade B. — -Milk Suitable for Adults. 

(1) Selected Milk, Raw, from cows which are certified by veterinarians after 

physical examination. 

(2) Pasteurized Milk. 

Grade C. — For Cooking and Manufacturing Purposes Only. 

All milk not conforming to the requirements of Grades A and B. 

During the past year this grading plan has actually been put in force and compliance 
with its provisions insisted upon. Much emphasis has been placed upon the requirement 
of labeling in accordance with these provisions in order that the public might have as full 
information as possible as to the quality of milk which is purchased. Criminal proceed- 
ings have therefore been instituted whenever it was found that milk was improperly 
labeled. 

In order to urge dealers who were selling Grade C milk for cooking, to advance to the 
Grade B class, a warning sign was placed in all stores in which Grade C milk was sold call ing 
the attention of the public to this fact. All restaurants and hotels were required to 
obtain permits to sell milk and their permits were restricted to the sale of Grades 
A and B. 

12 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION. 

Pasteurization. 

The fundamental object of the grading system is to extend the scope of pasteurization, 
an expedient which modern knowledge of the transmission of infectious diseases shows 
to be absolutely necessary in a great city drawing its milk supply from distant points. 
The effect of the grading system in this direction has been reinforced by specific resolutions 
of the board, and the resulting extension of pasteurization has been very satisfactory. 
At the end of 1912 about one hundred pasteurization plants are either in actual operation 
or soon to be completed, including those in the city and in the country districts, and from 
one-third to one-half of the milk supply is pasteurized. 

Other Improvements in Control of Milk. 

During 19 12 rigid inspections were made of stores in which milk is sold and a large 
number of permits were revoked. Examination of empty containers being returned to 
the country was continued and a number of prosecutions were commenced for violation 
of the provision of the Sanitary Code requiring such containers to be cleaned. An impor- 
tant court decision recently rendered has sustained the legality and constitutionality of 
this provision of the code. 

By increasing the severity of the scoring of milk stores, where "loose" or "dipped" 
milk is sold, an effort has been made to restrict the sale of such milk, but as this method 
was found not sufficiently successful, the Board of Health adopted a resolution, to take effect 
June 1, 19 13, forbidding the sale of milk dipped from cans, except in special milk stores 
approved by the department for which a permit has been issued, or in places in which 
foodstuffs, other than milk products, are sold in original packages only. 



Infants' Milk Stations. 

The fifteen municipal infants' milk stations operated in 191 1 by the Department of 
Health, in cooperation with similar stations under the control of private associations proved 
conclusively the value of such milk depots as centers of activity for the reduction of infant 
mortality. The city authorities accordingly made financial provision for the continuance 
of this work on an extended scale in 1912. In accordance with the provisions of the 
budget schedule for the year, forty additional milk stations were opened during the early 
spring and late winter months, making a total of fifty-five such stations under the control 
of this division. These stations are situated throughout the five boroughs and provide 
places where a mother may obtain pure milk for infant feeding at the lowest market price 
and in addition may receive such instruction as may be necessary from a physician and 
nurse to teach her how to keep her baby well and the exact method by which it should 
be fed. 

The experience of the Department of Health in the conduct of these stations was 
most gratifying. During the year, 41,233 mothers brought their babies to the stations. 
During the same period a total of only 169 deaths occurred among the babies registered 
at the stations, a death rate which is phenomenally low, especially when it is remembered 
that these stations are all situated in those parts of the city where the birth rate and the 
infant death rate are very high. 

SupervisionJof Food. 

During 19 12, twenty-one inspectors were employed continuously in the inspection 
of food. The six abattoirs which are subject to the inspection of this department and over 

13 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

which the Federal Government exercises no supervision have each been under the care of 
one inspector during all the working hours. The six inspectors thus detailed have been 
immediately under the supervision of three veterinarians. The scheme of inspection em- 
ployed has been one of constant rotation, so that not only have the three veterinarians 
interchanged posts daily, but each month the six inspectors have been assigned to different 
abattoirs. It is believed that maximum efficiency and results have been obtained by this 
method. 

The evil of uncovered foodstuffs on push carts and street stands has been fought un- 
ceasingly and hundreds of arrests have been made for this violation of the Sanitary Code. 
While the evil is still prevalent, there is no doubt that it has been much lessened by the 
continued warfare of the department as evidenced by the many covered stands now to be 
seen in every section of the city. Retail shops, the proprietors of which were displaying 
unfit foodstuffs for sale, have received the constant attention of this division and confisca- 
tions of such material and arrests of offenders have undoubtedly raised this branch of busi- 
ness to a higher standard than it heretofore possessed. Bakeshops have been systematically 
inspected and wherever unwholesome eggs and unfit fruits have been discovered active 
prosecution has followed, with the result that the use of such material has become extremely 
infrequent. This fact is shown by recent records. 

The policy of forbidding the reshipment from the city of unfit canned goods has 
resulted in the destruction of approximately 2,000,000 pounds of such material during the 
past year. The leading wholesale grocers have given hearty cooperation to the department 
in this movement, and this, in a measure, accounts for the splendid results achieved. 

The guarding of the waterfront has resulted in the confiscation and destruction of 
enormous quantities of fruits and vegetables unfit for food which otherwise might have been 
placed upon the market. 

Table waters, now so generally used, have been very extensively analyzed with the 
result that a number were found absolutely unfit for drinking purposes. Some of these 
have been withdrawn from the market, while in many other cases the manufacturers 
have made the changes necessary to eliminate the contamination complained of. 

Large numbers of samples of foodstuffs have been collected for examination by the 
chemist, and in every case in which poisonous ingredients or unadvertised preservatives 
were found, the prosecution of the offenders has immediately followed. This has resulted 
in the almost complete discontinuance of the custom, formerly very common, of using pre- 
servatives in decaying meats. 

The wholesale egg market has received the undivided attention of one inspector, 
and a marked improvement in the methods formerly employed in this industry has 
resulted. 

With the increased force of inspectors allowed for the coming year, it is intended to 
follow systematically hitherto impossible lines of investigation. Thus, certain inspectors 
will be assigned solely to bakeshops, others to restaurants, and still others to make a study 
of the methods employed in candy factories and prepared food factories. The plans relat- 
ing to these new channels of effort made possible by the slight increase in force will no doubt 
produce gratifying results. 

Medical Inspection of School Children. 

The department has maintained as usual a system of medical inspection and examina- 
tion of all children in the public schools of the city for the purpose of excluding from school 
attendance those who show any symptoms of contagious disease, and for the purpose of 
making a complete physical examination of all the children on an average of once in two 
years. All children entering school for the first time undergo a physical examination, 
and another before their graduation, and as nearly as possible one every two years in the 
interim. 

During 1912, 288,469 children received this physical examination. Of this number, 

14 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION. 

87,361 were found to be suffering from one or more untreated physical defects interfering 
with their general health, and therefore rendering them less likely to profit by their school 
training. 

In addition, 119,359 children were found to have defective teeth, although otherwise 
normal. 

The character of the defects found was as follows: 

Defective vision 15,075 

Defective hearing 888 

Defective teeth 123,163 

Defective nasal breathing 13,863 

Hypertrophied tonsils 19,549 

Malnutrition 6, 106 

Cardiac disease 1 ,242 

Pulmonary disease 299 

Orthopedic disease 547 

Nervous disease 660 

Of the children suffering from the above physical defects, 57,062 received treatment 
as a result of the efforts of the school nurses who visit the homes of the children and instruct 
the parents in the methods of hygiene and sanitation, urging the latter to take their children 
to the family physician for treatment. The cases thereafter are kept under the observa- 
tion of the nurse until treatment has been received. 

During the year the Department established six Children's Medical Clinics, located 
in those parts of the city where proper facilities for clinical treatment have been lacking. 
These clinics are designed exclusively for those school children whose parents are totally 
unable to pay for medical treatment. They are already crowded to their capacity. 

The need of facilities for dental treatment has been acute. The budget appropriation 
for 19 1 3 allowing the appointment of ten dentists makes it possible for the department 
to make a beginning in establishing dental clinics in connection with the clinics for school 
children already mentioned. 

Typhoid Fever. 

An advisory committee on the methods of the department in supervising typhoid 
fever has been established, consisting of a number of eminent sanitary and medical experts 
who have volunteered their services. On the recommendation of this committee, numerous 
improvements have been made in the methods in use in this department and better co- 
operation with other city departments concerned, particularly the Department of Water 
Supply, Gas and Electricity, has been secured. 

Immunization against typhoid fever, or the inoculation of a healthy person with ster- 
ilized typhoid cultures in order to prevent infection with typhoid fever, has passed beyond 
the experimental stage and has become established as a prophylactic measure of proved 
efficiency. 

Feeling that its wider use, under proper precautions, is called for, the Department 
of Health of the City of New York provided for the free performance of immunizations on 
request, under conditions similar to those governing the free administration of diphtheria 
antitoxin. 

For the present all inoculations are made at the homes of applicants by the typhoid 
inspectors, or at the Central Office of the Department, Centre and Walker Streets, Borough 
of Manhattan, or the culture is furnished free to physicians for their own use. All requests 
for immunization by inspectors must be made by, or approved by the attending physician. 
In all other cases, the applicants are required to come to the Central Office, where the 
fact that they have no attending physician, and the reasons for and against immunization 
are very carefully investigated before the same is performed. 

15 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

Immunization is offered to all other members of every family in which a case of typhoid 
fever occurs. 

History of Inoculation Against Typhoid Fever. 

The first immunizations against typhoid fever in man were made by Pfeiffer and 
Kolle, but to Wright is due the credit for the introduction of the systematic practice of 
immunization on an extended scale, and as before stated, its value is now thoroughly 
established. 

Official committees appointed by the governments of the United States, England, 
Germany, and France have investigated the matter, and all unite in recommending the 
employment of immunization as a rational and practical method of diminishing by a sensible 
proportion, the frequency and gravity of typhoid fever in all individuals whose profession, 
or whose usual or accidental methods of alimentation, or daily or frequent association with 
the sick or with typhoid carriers, expose them to direct or indirect contagion by the bacillus 
of typhoid fever. 

The procedure has been widely used, especially in armies, and the conclusions of the 
present day are based on the results of more than 100,000 immunizations. 

The following conclusions are accepted by practically all authorities: 

1. The practice confers a notable immunity against typhoid infection. 

2. It reduces by three-quarters the case incidence of typhoid fever in groups of in- 
dividuals submitted to this method of immunization. 

3. Under similar conditions, typhoid fever occurring in immunized persons has ap- 
proximately one-half the fatality of typhoid cases in persons not so protected. 

4. Typhoid fever thus is less apt to occur, and when it does occur, runs a milder 
course among the sick who have been immunized than among those who have not. 

Among persons who may be designated as particularly to be benefited by immuniza- 
tion the following may be enumerated: 

(a) Physicians, hospital internes, medical students, and orderlies in hospitals. 

(b) Members of families among whom typhoid carriers have been proved to exist, or 
those exposed to the disease or who expect to be brought in contact with it. 

(c) Persons who expect to travel or settle in places which are habitual foci of typhoid 
fever. 

(d) Those living in regions where typhoid fever is prevalent. 



Venereal Diseases. 

By resolution of the Board of Health on February 29, 1912, effective May 1, 1912, 
all hospitals and public institutions were required to report cases of venereal diseases com- 
ing under their observation, and all physicians were requested to furnish similar information, 
concerning private patients under their care except that the name and address of the patient 
need not be reported. The terms of the resolution provided that all such information and 
reports should be regarded as absolutely confidential and should not be deemed public records 
or made accessible to the public. The Department also undertook the free bacteriological 
examination of specimens for the diagnosis of these diseases and has established a special 
clinic for diagnosis by means of the Wassermann and other tests. On December 17, 1912, 
a circular letter was sent to all physicians in New York City reminding them of this action 
by the Board of Health and again requesting the reporting of all private cases coming under 
their observation. 

16 



REPORT OF THE VARIOUS DIVISIONS. 

Offices of the Secretary and Chief Clerk. 

Searches Made and Transcripts Issued of the Records of Births, Marriages and Deaths 

' — 

Man- Brook- The n Rich- New York 

1912. hattan. lyn. Bronx. queens. mond City> 

Applications for searches. 32,974 18,424 4,303 2,234 778 58,713 
Transcripts signed and 
authenticated — 

Births 5,233 4,052 359 295 305 10,244 

Marriages 3,259 2,023 55 82 29 5,448 

Deaths 22,087 14.487 4,406 2,485 521 43,986 

Not found — Certificates 

issued 4,522 3,014 156 106 57 7,854 

Communications received 

and answered 3>538 2,738 222 489 119 7, 106 

Fees received $15,722.00 9,296.00 1,881.20 1,140.00 381.50 28,420.70 



Action Taken by the Board of Health on Reports, Communications, Permits, Notices and Orders. 

1912. 

Special reports and communications submitted to the Board of Health for action . . 976 

Premises declared a public nuisance 129 

Premises ordered vacated 232 

Lodging-house permits granted 207 

Cow permits granted 141 

Miscellaneous permits granted 16,063 

Permits denied 2,433 

Permits revoked 6,845 

Board orders extended or modified 3 

Extension or modification of Board orders denied 68 

Delayed and imperfect certificates of births, marriages and deaths approved and 

ordered filed 121 

Corrected certificates of births, marriages and deaths approved and ordered filed . . 1,158 

Contracts. 

In 1912, no contracts for supplies were made at a total cost of $536,467.65; twenty- 
eight contracts for building construction, building materials, and architect's services were 
made at a cost of $322,733.33. During the year many items which had previously been pur- 
chased on open market orders were included under contract purchase, namely, horseshoe- 
ing, guinea pigs and rabbits, green groceries and fruits, textiles, furniture, wagons, etc. 

New Buildings. 

The following schedule shows the new buildings and permanent improvements to 
existing plant for which contracts were let during 191 2: 

Description and Location. 1912. Cost. 

Construction for two concrete pavilions, Riverside Hospital $103,317.94 

Construction for an Isolation Pavilion, Kingston Ave. Hospital 62,625.50 

Construction for an extension to Nurses' Home, Riverside Hospital 50,496 . 00 

Construction for an Underground Tunnel, Willard Parker Hospital 13,086.00 

Construction for Sewer Lines at Kingston Avenue Hospital 15,997.00 

Construction for Water Lines at Otisville, New York 26,179.00 

Construction for Tunnel at Willard Parker Hospital 17,949 .00 

Construction for Pumps at Kingston Avenue Hospital 2. \2o. 00 

Total $292,070 . 44 

17 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

Statement showing Sale and Distribution of Laboratory Products. 

Antitoxin. 

Stock and ledger accounts at beginning of year $28,053.02 

Value of Antitoxin received from laboratory 240,360. 78 



5,413.80 
Less Antitoxin to replace old stock 12,988 . 05 



$255,425-75 



Free Distribution $179,659.75 



Cash 29,273 

Discounts to agents 1,170 

On sale with agents and ledger accounts 42,557 

Stock on hand 2,764 



60 
33 

4^ 

65 



$255,425.75 
Preventive Hydrophobia Treatments. 

Amount owing at beginning of year $11,474.00 

Treatments reported during year 10,831 .00 



Total $22,305.00 
Cash receipts during year 8,698 . 00 



Amount owing at end of year $13,607.00 



Virus. 

Stock and ledger accounts at beginning of year $4,618.52 

Value of Vaccine Virus from laboratory 30,182 . 15 



$34,800.67 
Less Virus to replace old stock 2,739 . 65 



Free Distribution $15,586.25 

Cash 9,674.96 

Discount to agents 3,915.41 

On sale with agents and ledger accounts 1,999 • IO 

Stock on hand 1 ,085 . 30 



$32,061.02 



$32,061.02 

Corporate Stock Issued for Permanent Improvements, 1912. — (None.) 

Total Financial Resources of the Department during 1912. 

1 — 

Sales of Care and 

Appropriation Bond Issue Laboratory Maintenance of Total 

Products Immigrants 

$3,171,217.00 $57,712.00 $47,646.56 $278.00 $3,276,853.56 



18 



SKCRKTARY AX I) CHIEF CLERK. 



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19 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

Legal Work. 
Criminal Actions. 

An examination of the accompanying table, under the heading "Criminal Actions, 
Magistrates' Courts," will disclose the disposition of prosecutions brought during the year. 
It will be observed that 1,482 defendants were discharged. This does not mean that 
the Department failed to substantiate the charge brought, but is explained by the fact that 
883 actions based upon failure to comply with Board orders or notices were discontinued, 
the defendant having in each instance fully met the requirements of the Department. 
The remaining figures contained in the table are self-explanatory. 

The table under the caption, " Criminal Actions in Court of Special Sessions," embodies 
the more important criminal prosecutions. These actions emanate from the Magistrates' 
Courts, being transferred to the Court of Special Sessions upon a motion made in behalf 
of the Department in accordance with Section 1265 of the Charter of the City of New York 
as amended by Section 95 of the Inferior Courts Act. An examination of this table dis- 
closes that 1,047 actions were disposed of during the year. Of this number 838 defendants 
were convicted and 209 discharged. In explanation of the number discharged, it may be 
stated that only 82 defendants were acquitted after a trial upon the merits of the case, the 
remaining 127 being dismissed upon motion made at the request of the Department, the 
defendants having fully met the requirements of the Board of Health. The amount of 
fines imposed during the year was $21,675 as compared with $13,170 imposed by the same 
court in 191 1. Ten defendants received jail sentences, one of whom was both fined and 
imprisoned. In a number of instances the maximum fine of $500 was imposed, and, as a 
whole, the court treated those found guilty of the offense as charged with great severity. 

The majority of these prosecutions were directed against individuals, yet a surprising 
number of corporations were also proceeded against for violating the provisions of the 
statutes. Criminal prosecutions of corporations are daily increasing. Legal questions 
involving corporate as distinguished from individual acts are constantly arising and demand- 
ing the attention of the courts. During the past year the prosecutions of corporations by 
the Department of Health were uniformly successful and in many instances the extreme 
penalty the law provides was imposed. 

Brief mention has heretofore been made in regard to the prosecutions of individuals 
and corporations charged with violating the provisions of Section 181 of the Sanitary Code, 
in that they caused, suffered or allowed dense smoke to be discharged from buildings, 
vessels, engines or vehicles within the jurisdiction of the City of New York. Special inspec- 
tors were detailed by the Department to this branch of work. Numerous actions were in- 
stituted in the courts which resulted in the conviction of a number of defendants, while 
in other instances the nuisance was abated before trial. The result of these prosecutions 
is apparent. 

Criminal Actions in Court of Special Sessions. 

Cases: New York. Manhattan. Bronx. Brooklyn. Queens. Richmond. 

Pending, January I, 1012. 186 124 y 49 2 2 
Transferred from Magis- 
trates' Courts 1.004 474 94 3S3 65 18 

Total cases 1,190 508 103 402 67 20 

Disposition: 

Discharged 209 64 12 105 19 9 

Fined 597 3l6 56 188 33 4 

Sentence suspended 232 102 23 87 IS 5 

Jail sentence * 9 4 4 1 

Pending December 31, 

1912 143 112 12 18 1 

Total cases 1,190 598 103 402 67 20 

Amount of fines imposed $21,675.00 $12,525.00 Si, 975-00 $6,410.00 S620.00 S145.00 

* In one instance the defendant both fined and imprisoned. The disposition of the said case is credited 
under item designated "Fined." 

20 



LEGAL WORK. 
Criminal Actions in Magistrates' Courts. 



Cases: New York. Manhattan. Bronx. Brooklyn. Queens. Richmond. 



Pending, January I, 1912. 89 13 12 52 12 

New cases in Magis- 
trates' Courts 7,179 4.257 4 r >5 2,142 289 26 

Total cases 7.268 4.270 477 2,194 301 26 

Disposition: 

Held for Special Sessions. 1,004 474 94 353 65 18 

Discharged 1,482 667 187 438 183 7 

Fined 4,108 3.031 164 883 29 1 

Sentence suspended 530 23 17 484 6 

Jail sentence 7 2 5 

Pending, December 31, 

1912 137 73 15 31 18 

Total cases 7.268 4.270 477 2,194 301 26 

Amount of fines $9,023.25 $6,522.50 $434.00 $1,945-75 $11900 $2.00 



Civil Actions. 

Civil actions include actions in conversion instituted to compel payment of moneys 
due the Department of Health for laboratory supplies; actions to compel compliance with 
sanitary orders, directed principally to non-resident owners of property situated in the 
City of New York; actions against individuals charged with the duty of reporting births, 
marriages, deaths, and infectious diseases; actions against persons for issuance of false 
certificates or reports of births, marriages or deaths; actions against undertakers for the 
retention of dead bodies of human beings for a longer period than four days, or the removal 
or burial thereof without a permit ; and other actions of a miscellaneous character involving 
violations of the Sanitary Code and the Charter of the City of New York. 

In considering the civil branch of the law applicable to health work, attention is espe- 
cially called to actions instituted against practising physicians and midwives for failure to 
report births to the Department of Health, in accordance with the provisions of Sections 
1237 and 1239 of the Charter of the City of New York. 

This statute requires that physicians and midwives who attend professionally at the 
birth of a child must report the same to the Department within ten days after the birth. 
Failure to make such reporting may involve the most serious consequences to the child, 
affecting its legitimacy, property rights, education and citizenship. The public is also 
vitally interested from a health and statistical standpoint. It is evident that serious results 
would occur through the neglect or omission to file the report of birth, whether such neglect 
be intentional or unintentional, as the injury to the child is the same in either case. The 
rigid enforcement of this statute is therefore essential to the public welfare in order that the 
rights of the citizens of the City of New York may be protected. 

The requirements of the statute were repeatedly brought to the attention of physicians 
and midwives by the Department of Health, by personal communications and through the 
public press. Finding that these efforts were unsuccessful in securing a complete registra- 
tion, the Commissioner of Health determined to take drastic action, and in the latter part 
of the year 1910 forwarded all violations of the statute to the Corporation Counsel. Civil 
actions were thereupon instituted and continued from that time until the early part of the 
present year. These prosecutions resulted in 310 physicians and midwives paying penal- 
ties for their neglect to perform their legal duty. The courts uniformly sustained these 
actions and held that it was obligatory for physicians and midwives to comply strictly with 
the terms of the statute. This is another application of the general rule governing health 
actions, that the welfare and health of the community as a whole are paramount. It is 
better that a physician or midwife should suffer some slight inconvenience than that the 
child should be deprived of its legal and equitable rights. 

21 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

The prosecution of these cases has undoubtedly been of inestimable benefit in causing 
prompt registration of births. 

In a number of other instances, physicians and midwives were prosecuted for filing 
false reports relative to births and deaths. In such cases the severest penalties were ex- 
acted because of the dangerous character of the offense which prima facie called into ques- 
tion the honesty and integrity of the offender. It was, however, found that in nearly all 
cases the defendants were not actuated by any ulterior motive, but were simply careless 
and negligent in the performance of their duties. The conclusion reached from this class 
of cases is that many physicians and midwives neglect to keep a record as required by Sec- 
tion 1237 of the Charter, of the births at which they attend professionally. 

As an additional argument for the necessity of the strict enforcement of the laws appli- 
cable to the registration of births, we have but to consider the number of applications made 
to the Commissioner of Health to have placed on file in the Department of Health births 
which through failure of the physician or midwife in attendance were never filed. The Cor- 
poration Counsel received during the year, 1,696 such applications from the Commissioner 
for examination to determine whether the legal requirements of Section 1241 of the Charter 
had been fully complied with. Of this number 1,680 were granted and 16 denied. Inas- 
much as the majority of persons affected are those in poor or moderate circumstances, the 
neglect or omission of the physician or midwife is both a legal and a moral wrong. 

A number of undertakers and cemetery-keepers were found to be negligent in the per- 
formance of their legal duties and obligations. In each instance the defendants were 
required to pay penalties, which will undoubtedly have the effect of preventing a repetition 
of the offense. 

Civil Actions. 



New York. Manhattan. 



Bronx. 



Brooklyn. Queens. Richmond 



Violations received: 

Violations pending Jan- 
uary 1, 1912 1,072 

Violations received and 

notices sent 8,853 

Total violations. 

Disposition: 

Complied with before suit 

Suit begun 

Pending (without suit), 

December 31, 1912, 

awaiting instructions by 

Department of Health . 

Total violations. 0,025 

Actions begun: 

Civil actions pending Jan- 
uary 1, 1012 45 

Civil actions begun to re- 
cover penalties on vio- 
lations 28 

Other civil actions begun. 90 

Judgments vacated 3 

Total suits 166 

Disposition: 

Discontinuance, compli- 
ance secured 129 

Judgments recovered. ... 3 

Pending, December 31, 

1912 3* 

Total suits 166 

Amount of costs, penalties and 
judgments collected in civil 
actions and paid to Secre- 
tary of Board $1,020.00 

Amount of claims collected for 

antitoxin and virus 30.24 



176 
3.994 



76 



525.00 
30.24 



79 
1. 117 



369 
2,603 



1,196 



375 
1.028 



3 

13 



73 
III 



9,925 


4,170 


1,196 


2,972 


1.403 


184 


8,281 
28 


3.678 

5 


873 
21 


2,785 

1 


919 

1 


26 


1,616 


487 


302 


186 


483 


158 



184 



E70.00 S105.00 S10.00 S10.00 



LEGAL WORK 

Certain Important Decisions. 
Slaughter-House Odors. 

Offensive odors due to careless management and operation of slaughter-houses located 
in the Borough of Manhattan have long been a source of complaint to the Department of 
Health. The burden of detecting these odors has heretofore devolved upon the inspc 
of the Department, and necessitated almost constant surveillance. The efforts of the 
Department to prevent the escape of these odors into the outer air had been confined to the 
issuance of notices of violations of the Sanitary Code to offenders. The Commissioner of 
Health determined that the burden of preventing odors from escaping should be borne by 
the slaughter-house proprietors, it being their duty, by virtue of the character of their busi- 
ness, to operate their plants in such a manner as not to violate the strict provisions of the 
Sanitary Code. He therefore determined to refer all violations discovered by inspectors 
to the Corporation Counsel for prosecution. Three civil actions to recover penalties were 
subsequently instituted against the owners of large establishments and resulted in sustaining 
absolutely the attitude of the Commissioner. In one instance the defendants made a very 
determined fight to escape from their predicament. The action was tried in the Municipal 
Court and a judgment obtained against the defendants. An appeal was immediately 
taken to the Appellate Term of the Supreme Court, which court unanimously sustained 
the judgment of the lower court. Motion was thereafter made both to the Appellate Term 
and the Appellate Division for leave to appeal, each of which motions was denied with 
costs. The determination of the Appellate Term therefore stands as the law governing all 
future prosecutions of this character. 

Stripped of its legal phraseology the decision holds that the escape of offensive odors 
from slaughter-houses within the City of New York, even though for an inappreciable 
length of time and in the absence of intent, is a violation of Section 85 of the Sanitary Code. 
It places the burden upon the proprietors to detect .and prevent such odors from escaping 
into the outer air. The remedying of these conditions in no way affects the question of 
liability, as the law places an absolute and mandatory obligation upon those who conduct 
slaughter-houses in the City of New York to so conduct them that no offensive odors shall 
escape. 

Signing of Death Certificate. 

The validity of Section 163c of the Sanitary Code prescribing that a certificate of 
death must be signed by a physician upon whom was conferred the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine, as a condition to issuing a burial permit, was upheld by the Court of Appeals. 
The legality of this Section had been attacked by Charles F. Bandell, an osteopathic 
physician, acting in behalf of himself and other osteopathic physicians of the city. This 
decision establishes the right of the Department of Health to require all death certificates 
to be signed by physicians upon whom has been conferred the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 

Cleaning of Milk Receptacles. 

A very important decision was rendered by the Court of Special Sessions, First Divi- 
sion, in the cases People vs. Roth, People vs. Frudenberg, and People vs. Meyers, the defend- 
ants being employees of a large milk concern doing an extensive retail business in the City 
of New York. The defendants were charged with having received and having in their 
possession unclean milk receptacles which, in violation of Section 183 of the Sanitary Code, 
had not been washed after holding milk. The defendants demurred in each instance to 
the information upon the grounds that the facts stated in said information do not constitute 
a crime, and that the latter portion of the said section which provides: * nor shall 

any person receive or have in his possession any such receptacle which had not been washed 
after holding milk or cream or which is unclean in any way, " is void because the said 
ordinance conflicts with the Agricultural Law of the State, and, furthermore, that the said 

23 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

ordinance conflicts with the Constitutions of the State of New York and the United States, 
respectively, because it deprives or tends to deprive the defendants of their property without 
due process of law. 

Hon. Isaac F. Russell, Chief Justice of the Court of Special Sessions, wrote an exhaustive 
opinion in these cases sustaining the contention set up in behalf of the Department of Health, 
that the said section was a reasonable and valid exercise of police power and in no way 
conflicted with the constitutional rights of the defendants, nor was it in conflict with the 
Agricultural Law. 

One of these cases subsequently came on for trial in the Court of Special Sessions for 
the purpose of testing the validity of the ordinance in question in the higher courts. The 
court found the defendant guilty. The defendants immediately appealed to the Appellate 
Division, in which court at the date of this report the cases were pending awaiting final 
determination. 

Rotten Eggs. 

A criminal prosecution was on April 28, 191 1, instituted against the F. E. Rosebrock 
Company, a corporation, charging the said company with having violated the provisions 
of Section 42 of the Sanitary Code, in that the said defendant on the 15th day of April, 
191 1, unlawfully did bring into the City of New York and hold and offer for sale a certain 
quantity of eggs which were not then healthy, fresh, sound, wholesome and safe for human 
food. The said defendant is a domestic corporation engaged in the sale of butter, eggs and 
bakers' supplies, at 325-327 Greenwich Street, Borough of Manhattan, City of New York. 
The case came on for trial in the Court of Special Sessions on the 18th day of December, 
191 1, and the defendant was found guilty and the maximum penalty of $500, was imposed 
by the court. The defendant immediately appealed to the Appellate Division, which 
unanimously sustained the judgment of the Court of Special Sessions. 



Unwholesome Meat. 

One, Isidor Adler, was convicted in the Court of Special Sessions on the 19th day of 
October, 191 1, of having violated Section 42 of the Sanitary Code, in that he did bring into 
the City of New York, a "quantity of meat, and hold and offer for sale, keep and store 
therein, although the said meat was then and there not healthy, fresh, sound, wholesome 
and safe for human food." In passing sentence on the defendant the court stated, "This 
is one of the most vicious cases we have had before the court. The defendant is sentenced 
to the penitentiary for the term of three months." From such judgment of conviction 
the defendant appealed to the Appellate Division and the court unanimously affirmed the 
said judgment of conviction, no opinion being written. The defendant thereupon made a 
motion for a new trial to the Court of Special Sessions on the ground of newly discovered 
evidence. The said court granted the motion. Upon the retrial, the defendant was again 
found guilty, but the court modified their former judgment and fined the defendant $200, 
which he paid. 

Examination of Records. 

In the matter of the application of William H. Allen to examine certain records on 
file in the Department of Health, the Court of Appeals affirmed, without opinion, the judg- 
ment of the Appellate Division, which court denied the application of the said Allen 
and refused to allow such examination, sustaining the right of the Department to determine 
what safeguards and regulations should protect the privacy of its records. The opinion of 
the Appellate Division, written by Mr. Justice Scott, published in the yearly report of 191 1, 
is, therefore, by the affirmance of the Court of Appeals, the final determination of the 
Courts upon the question. 

24 



LEGAL WORK. 



Court Procedure in Health Cases. 



One, Morris Cohen, arrested pursuant to a warrant issued on an information filed by 
an inspector of the Department of Health, charging him with violating the provisions of 
Section 68 of the Sanitary Code, obtained a writ of habeas corpus for the purpose of testing 
the right of the Department to have the case transferred to the Court of Special Sessions 
in accordance with the provisions of Section 95 of the Inferior Courts Act, thereby exclud- 
ing his right to an examination of the witness upon whose depositions the warrant had been 
issued. The writ of habeas corpus came on for argument before a Special Term of the Su- 
preme Court, First Department, which Court dismissed the said writ and remanded the 
defendant for trial in the Court of Special Sessions. The defendant thereupon appealed 
to the Appellate Division, which court unanimously sustained the judgment of the Special 
Term. The questions involved in the decision are of vital importance to the Department 
of Health, and the decision will prove of inestimable value, because it sets at rest for all 
time a question of law which has troubled the lower Courts for many years, and absolutely 
sustains the validity of the section involved, as well as holding that the defendant's con- 
stitutional rights were not invaded. 



25 



SANITARY BUREAU. 
Year Ending December 31, 1912. 

DIVISION OF INSPECTIONS. 

As the result of the action of the Board of Health during the month of May, a number 
of changes were made in regard to the inspection and supervision of places in which food- 
stuffs are handled, prepared, stored or offered for sale, and the supervision of all permits 
required by these places was assigned to the Division of Food Inspection. In consequence 
of this, six inspectors of the Division of Inspections were temporarily assigned to duty else- 
where, thus reducing the force of sanitary inspectors from 30 to 24 in the Borough of 
Manhattan. 

About the usual number of citizens' complaints were received and investigated by the 
inspectors and patrolmen assigned to this division, and these complaints in a large city like 
New York embrace all manner and kinds of subjects, both within and without the province 
or jurisdiction of this department. In addition to the investigation of citizens' complaints, 
the inspectors are required to make reinspections on notices or orders that have been pre- 
viously issued. 

Stables. 

The usual attention was paid to buildings occupied for stable purposes with the result 
that not as many complaints were received as would be expected from a business of this 
nature conducted in a congested city. Routine inspections are constantly made for the 
purpose of enforcing cleanliness in this character of premises. The Sanitary Code requires 
a permit to be obtained when horses are to be stabled in a cellar. It having been established 
that flies are disseminators of disease, the Sanitary Code has been amended so as to require 
that in any stable where manure is not removed daily it shall be adequately screened or 
otherwise protected so as to prevent the access of flies. 

Lodging Houses. 

Lodging houses are operated under permits issued by the Board of Health, and before 
such permits are issued it must be shown that the proposed lodging house complies with 
the requirements of the Sanitary Code, which, among other things, insist that 400 cubic 
feet of air space shall be allotted to each lodger. One inspector was assigned during the year 
to the duty of supervising lodging houses. The law requires that two inspections of each 
lodging house shall be made each year. During 19 12 the number of inspections made aver- 
aged twenty-two for each house. 

Lodging-House Inspection. 



1910. 1911. 1912. 



New York . 
Manhattan . 
Brooklyn . . 
The Bronx. 
Queens .... 
Richmond . 



Permits. 


Inspections. 


Permits. 


Inspections. 


Permits. I 


nspections 


140 


800 


123 


1,505 


136 


2,925 


114 


636 


96 


1,204 


107 


2,381 


25 


141 


26 


260 


28 


469 


1 


23 


1 


4i 


1 


64 



26 



GENERAL SANITARY INSPECTION. 

Smoke Nuisance. 

During 1912, the smoke nuisance has been the subject of much concern and activity 
upon the part of the department, and during the early part of the year the situation app' 
to be well in hand. About the beginning of May, however, it was noticed that more than 
the usual amount of dense smoke was being discharged from a number of business ho 
throughout the Borough of Manhattan. Upon investigation, it was alleged that the cause 
lay in the fact that the coal-producing sections were unable to furnish a sufficient amount 
of anthracite coal to meet the commercial demand, with the result that a large amount of 
bituminous coal had been placed upon the market. While there is no law prohibiting the 
use of the latter fuel, its character is such that if used without proper care upon the part of 
firemen and engineers large quantities of dense smoke will be discharged. All noti< 1 
orders relative to the discharge of dense smoke were marked for reinspection within twenty- 
four hours and, if their requirements were not finally complied with, summons were issued 
requiring the appearance of the offender in one of the Magistrates' courts. At this point 
the defendant usually requested an adjournment for one or two weeks and in many cases 
this was granted by the Magistrate, or the defendant was placed under bond and his case 
referred to the Court of Special Sessions. As a result of this activity, many notices were 
complied with before a summons was issued. When such a case is referred from the Magis- 
trates' Court to the Court of Special Sessions, two, three, and sometimes four or five weeks 
will elapse before the case is called, and in almost every instance during the past year the 
defendant then applied for an adjournment of from two weeks to a month which was usually 
granted, and in many instances two or three such adjournments would be obtained. It is 
but rarely in cases of this kind that the defendant complies with the order of the Board of 
Health until the court decision is rendered. 

Permits. 

In October, 19 1 2, the Board of Health adopted the policy of issuing yearly permits 
only and directed that all permits then in force and having an indefinite period to run should 
be revoked, and that persons holding such permits should make application for permits 
which would expire one year from date of issue. 

Transportation of Refuse Material. 

The problem of the collection, transportation and removal of refuse material in a 
large and congested city like New York is one that deserves special attention. The Depart- 
ment of Street Cleaning has charge of the removal of ashes and garbage. All other refuse 
material, together with a considerable amount of ashes and garbage, is removed in vehicles 
operated by private individuals under permits issued by this department. During the 
year 191 2, the Board of Health adopted new and more stringent rules and regulations in 
relation to the transportation of refuse material, including the issuance of a metal enamel 
permit, five inches wide and fourteen inches long, to be displayed upon the vehicle in such 
a situation as would be readily observed. 

Mosquito Extermination and Prevention. 

This work is in charge of a sanitary engineer who, during the latter half of 19 12, was 
assisted by a sanitary inspector. Nine laborers and one foreman were employed con- 
tinuously throughout the year. On August 5th twenty extra laborers were employed at 
$2.00 per day and two assistant foremen at $2.50 a day. These extra men worked seventy- 
eight days, when their services were dispensed with. The entire laboring force, both per- 
manent and temporary, was employed exclusively in the Borough of Richmond. 

The following tables show the location and the amount of work performed during 
the year: 

27 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

Work Performed by the Police Squad Detailed to the Department. 

During 1912, the force, consisting of fifty men, under the charge of a lieutenant of 
police, was distributed as follows: 

Manhattan 24 

Brooklyn 13 

Bronx 5 

Queens 5 

Richmond 3 

The officers cover sections laid out in the different boroughs and known as sanitary districts, 
within which they confine themselves to the enforcement of all sections of the Sanitary Code 
and perform such other work as the department assigns to them. They enforce quarantine, 
when necessary, and assist by their presence in enforcing vaccination of the occupants of 
premises in which smallpox is discovered. They also assist in enforcing the removal, when 
necessary, of patients to the hospitals. They destroy all glandered horses condemned by 
the department, also all rabid dogs and, at certain periods of the year, all stray dogs, if 
so ordered by the Board. They enforce the vacation of premises declared insanitary and 
uninhabitable by the Department of Health. They investigate citizens' complaints of 
violations of the Sanitary Code, inspect daily all manure, ash and garbage dumps, enforcing 
those sections of the Sanitary Code relating thereto, and, in fact, enforce compliance with 
all sections of the Sanitary Code so far as is possible by a police officer. 

During the first quarter of the year, the records of the work performed by the patrol- 
men of the Health Squad formed part of those of the Division of Inspections. During the 
last nine months, such records were forwarded directly to the Board by the lieutenant in 
command. 

Notices and Orders Disposed of During Year IQ12. 

Disposed of Disposed of Not Disposed 

Within Within of Within 

Number of 30 Days. 60 Days. 60 Days. 

Notices and Orders , *- , , *- ^ , * ^ 

Disposed of. Per Per Per 

No. Cent. No. Cent. No. Cent. 

New York 14.087 9,214 65.4 3,206 22.8 1,667 ir.8 

Manhattan 5,684 4,414 77.7 983 17.3 287 5-7 

Brooklyn 4,518 2,734 60.5 I.2S2 27.7 532 11. 8 

The Bronx 1,519 907 59.7 352 23.2 260 17. 1 

Queens 1,628 686 42.1 444 27.3 498 30.6 

Richmond 738 473 64.1 175 23.7 90 12.2 



Notices and Orders Pending December 31, IQI2, and When Issued. 

New York. Manhattan. Brooklyn. The Bronx. Queens. Richmond. 

Per Per Per Per Per Per 

No. Cent, of No. Cent, of No. Cent, of No. Cent, of No. Cent, of No. Cent, of 

. Total. Total. Total. Total. Total. Total. 

Notices and 1 

hiK e Dec e ^ < i I 921 ' I00 ° I02 ioo.o 353 100. o 116 100. o 140 100. o 120 100. o 

191 2 .'J _______ 

Number first is - 
sued in — 
1912 

December 477 51.8 122 63.5 211 59.7 65 56.0 49 35.0 30 25.0 

November 194 21.0 53 27.6 58 16.4 15 12.9 35 25.0 33 27.5 

October 93 10. 1 12 6.3 37 10.5 15 12.9 16 11. 4 13 10.8 

September 35 3.8 1 0.5 13 3.7 7 6.0 3 2.1 n 9.2 

August 76 8.2 3 1.6 19 5-4 10 8.6 13 9.3 31 25.8 

July 13 1.4 7 2.0 2 1.7 3 2.1 1 0.8 

June 8 0.9 1 o.3 7 5.0 

May 5 0.5 1 0.5 2 1.7 1 0.7 1 0.8 

March 1 0.1 1 0.3 

February 1 0.1 1 0.3 

Total, 1912. 903 98.0 192 100. o 348 98.6 116 100. o 127 90.7 120 100. o 

Year, 191 1 17 1.8 5 1.4 12 8.6 

Year, 1910. . . . 1 0.1 1 0.7 ... .... 



28 



GENERAL SANITARY INSPECTION. 
Complaints, Notices and Orders — igi2. 



Man- Brook- tj ^ „. . . _, , , 

hattan. lyn. Br onx. Queens. Richmond. Total. 



Complaints: 

Complaints pending (at be- 
ginning of year) 216 

Citizens' complaints re- 
ceived 10,659 

Complaints received from 

other Divisions 

Complaints filed by In- 
spectors 3,985 

Total Complaints 14,860 

No cause for action 7,976 

Duplicates 518 

Complaints referred to other 

Divisions 

Complaints referred to other 

Departments 781 

Complaints returned for No- 
tice or Order 5,44* 

Complaints pending (at end 

of year) 144 

Total 14,860 13,942 5,083 4,777 1,492 40,154 

Notices and Orders: 

Notices and Orders pending 

(at beginning of year) 387 300 104 312 23 1,126 

Notices and orders issued 

during year 5,530 4,621 1,559 1,548 849 14,107 



124 


54 


18 


9 


421 


12,715 


4,295 


4,001 


852 


32,522 






123 


19 


142 


1,103 


734 


635 

4,777 


612 


7,069 


13,942 


5,083 


1,492 


40,154 


6,425 
529 


2,814 
325 


2,416 
172 


440 
61 


20,071 
1,605 


635 


181 


150 


97 


1,063 


3.351 


224 


463 


71 


4,890 


2,992 


1,487 


i,548 


819 


12,287 


10 


52 


28 


4 


238 



Total Notices and Orders. . 5,917 4,9 2 i 1,663 1,860 872 15,233 

Complied with before legal 

action 5,432 3,645 1,317 1,442 706 12,542 

Complied with after legal 

action 252 

Rescinded 41 

Notices and Orders pending 

(at end of year) 192 

Total 5,917 

Number of Civil Actions dur- 
ing year 

Number of Criminal Actions 

during year 269 



873 
50 


202 

28 


186 
92 


32 

14 


i,545 
225 


353 


116 


140 


120 


921 


4,921 


1,663 

4 


1,860 


872 


15,233 
4 


271 


188 


168 


66 


962 



29 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



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33 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

Summary of Public Nuisances and Vacation of Premises. Orders Issued by the Board of 

Health During the Year 1912. 



New York. Manhattan. Brooklyn. The Bronx. Queens. 



Richmond. 




Number of orders issued . . . 

Number complied with . . 

Number not complied 

with 

Of those not complied with: 

Work in progress 

Work not in progress .... 
Of those work not in progress: 

Vacant 

Nothing done 



126 
109 


233 
208 


30 
25 


86 
79 


86 

74 


17 


25 


5 


7 


12 


II 
6 


19 
6 


5 


7 


6 
6 



j6 



17 
17 



Dead A nimals, Offal and Night Soil Ordered Removed, 191 2 





New 
York. 


Man- 
hattan. 


Brook- 
lyn. 


The 
Bronx. 


Queens. 


Rich- 
mond. 


Carcasses ordered removed — 
Large animals: 

Colts 


19,044 

8 

6 

78 

409 

4i 
19,549 


8,733 

2 
2 

49 

242 

1 camel 1 

[ 3 deer J 

9,032 


6,182 

1 

1 

16 

37 


1,724 

1 

3 

3 

16 


1,859 

7 
73 


546 

4 

3 

41 








6,237 


1.747 


1.939 


594 


Small animals: 

Pigs 

Cats and dogs from streets. . . . 
Cats and dogs from A. S. P. C. A. 


1,118 

123 

90 

158 

II3,9H 

218,786 
2 

334,188 


1,105 

122 

11 

139 

79,935 

129,307 
(deer) 1 

210,620 


4 

1 

47 

2 

14,408 

86,756 


1 
14.335 


5 

25 

12 

2,171 

(lion) 1 
2,214 


3 

7 

5 

3.062 

2,723 








101,218 


14.336 


5,800 




353.737 


219,652 


107.455 


16,083 


4. 153 


6,394 






Quantity of meat, offal, etc., ordered re- 
moved — 


5,650 

145,065 

628,600 

3.725,928 

4.505,243 


5,650 

145,065 

2,200 

1,602,128 


626,400 
2,123,800 


























1,755,043 


2,750,200 












Quantity of night soil removed — 

Cubic yards of night soil removed . . . 


3,337 




1,000 




2,337 





34 



DIVISION OF FOOD INSPECTION 

During the year 1912, the inspection of food supplies and their supervision were con- 
ducted under one administrative head, although the budgetary allowance for milk and 
food inspection was divided into two schedules. The single administration proved most 
satisfactory as there were many instances where the two lines of work interlocked and 
their being under the same control made greatly for efficiency. The most radical move, 
and one which has been a great step in advance, was the assignment to this division of one 
supervising and sixteen sanitary inspectors on May 26, 1912. These men inspect all 
places where foodstuffs are prepared, stored or sold, and examine the sanitary surroundings 
of the food. This has been productive of two great results: it has permitted the food in- 
spectors to devote all their time and energy to the examination of food and has placed in 
trained hands the important duty of maintaining proper sanitary conditions in the various 
premises concerned. When it is remembered that there are 28,510 establishments of this 
character, the force seems altogether too small for the work demanded. Revolutionary 
and progressive rules and regulations for the control of the manufacture of sausages and 
the preserving of meats were adopted by the Board of Health, on February 20, 191 2. 
The enforcement of these rules has occupied a large amount of the time of the sanitary in- 
spectors. On January 4, 1912, amendments made to the Sanitary Code reorganized 
completely the management of the milk supply. These amendments established three 
grades of milk and defined clearly the different kinds of milk which were henceforth to 
compose each grade. At the same time the rules and regulations for the care and sale of 
milk were altered so as to conform to the new amendments. Practically all the time of 
the milk inspectors has been devoted to the examinations necessary to the enforcement 
of the amendments. 

Food Condemned in 1912 

During 1912, the food section condemned and destroyed a total of 23,950,321 pounds 
of foodstuffs or 11,975 tons. The heaviest individual seizure was of approximately 4,561,- 
164 pounds of spoiled potatoes which were imported from Scotland during the months 
of April and May. The loss of this enormous quantity of potatoes has been charged to 
carelessness in transportation. One of the principal losers declared that his tubers were 
of first quality when he saw them loaded in Scotland, but were unrecognizable when unload- 
ed in New York. He charged that the change was brought about by dampness of the ship's 
hold, caused possibly by the wetting of the containing bags by a severe rainfall during the 
period of embarkation. Whatever the contributing cause, the condition and quantity of 
these several shiploads of potatoes, presented a difficult problem to the officers of the 
food division, inasmuch as it became their duty to identify, classify and dispose of the mass, 
which had been collected on two adjoining piers. The stench was well-nigh unbearable 
and resulted in several gangs of laborers refusing to continue the work of transferring the 
potatoes to scows for removal to their point of final destruction. No useful purpose could 
be discovered for these spoiled potatoes and it became necessary to dump them into the 
sea. Then arose a new problem. The potatoes must be dumped beyond the tidal limit 
and the owners of flat scows did not care to risk their boats so far from land, nor were 
the sea-going, self-dumping scows practicable because, when opened, such buoyant con- 
tents as potatoes would not empty from them and remained floating within the opened 
boat. A solution was finally arrived at by half -filling the self -dumping scows with potatoes, 
and then placing on top of these dirt and other heavy material of sufficient weight to 

35 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

submerge the potatoes temporarily and thus to permit the closing of the emptied scows. 
The magnitude and immediate need of this condemnation rendered necessary the employ- 
ment of a force of five inspectors working twelve hours a day for almost a week. Four of 
these inspectors were drawn from other districts and their transfer crippled in a measure 
the work of the division during its busiest month. 

Condemnation of Canned Goods. 

The second largest condemnation of the year consisted of 1,724,893 pounds of unfit 
canned goods. A quite recent policy of the department in refusing to allow the reshipment 
to the manufacturers of spoiled canned foodstuffs for the ostensible purpose ' ' of identifying 
the goods" has received the co-operation of the leading wholesale receivers and has resulted 
in the condemnation and destruction of millions of pounds of such material during the past 
few years. The seizure of foreign fruits, when found to be in an unwholesome state upon 
their arrival at the piers, has continued actively. The consignees of such fruits are willing 
aids to the inspectors because without a "condemnation certificate" from the Department 
of Health they are unable to recover their rebate of duties on such useless material from the 
custom authorities. With the limited number of inspectors on the waterfront, this necessity 
of the consignees has proved to be a most welcome aid, without which there is a possibility 
that some consignments of damaged fruits on obscure piers might never be discovered. 



Opium and Cocaine. 

The work which in former years was performed by this department in the detection 
of the sale of opium and cocaine without a physician's prescription has in practically all 
instances been referred to the Police Department. The reasons for this are that the food 
division has not sufficient men to cope with this evil in a proper manner and, as the offense 
is now classed as a felony, it comes more properly under the supervision of the Police. 



Wood Alcohol. 

In the early part of 1912, several cases of blindness and one of death occurring in a 
Southern laboring camp were brought to the attention of this department by the Italian 
Consul. It was believed that these results had been brought about by a certain brand of 
liquor shipped to the camp from New York City. Investigation led to the discovery that 
these liquors originated from a factory situated in a basement in Leroy Street. Inspectors 
in this division took possession of the basement and its contents and chemical examination 
of numerous samples of liquor found therein disclosed the fact that about 95 per cent, 
of the stock was adulterated with wood alcohol. More than a thousand bottles were 
seized and destroyed, and the owner of this material was sent to the penitentiary for a 
term of eight months upon pleading guilty to a violation of the interstate law. From record 
books found in his office a number of local receivers of this material were traced, and prose- 
cuted and punished and the liquor destroyed. More recently, investigation has revealed 
that some unscrupulous druggists have been using wood alcohol in mixtures of paregoric 
and spirits of lavender, and prosecutions of the offenders are under way. A number of 
cases of complete or partial blindness reported from the lower eastern section of the city 
were traced to the consumption of so-called "Weisser Schnapps" containing wood alcohol, 
and in several instances in which the offenders could be reached, prosecution and punish- 
ment followed. The use of wood alcohol as an adulterant of cheap liquors is due partly 
to ignorance on the part of the manufacturer, and partly to his cupidity, in an attempt 
to avoid the heavy Federal tax imposed upon grain alcohol. Evidence in cases of this 
character is most difficult to obtain for the dealers in this material are very wary of strangers 

36 



FOOD AND MILK INSPECTION. 

and their victims belong to an ignorant foreign class unable to suspect the source of their 
symptoms, and who, therefore, do not report them promptly to the authorities. 

Table Waters. 

Bacteriological examination of the many table and spring waters now so extensively 
used revealed the fact that many of them were polluted. The owners of such contaminated 
waters were compelled by the Department of Health either to render their products safe 
or to withdraw them from the market. 



Bakeries. 

Bakeshops have been frequently inspected for the purpose of examining the materials 
employed, and in order to check the use of unfit eggs and spoiled fruits, which practice has 
been greatly diminished by the prosecutions and punishments which resulted. Several 
fines of $250 were imposed and in two instances the offenders were imprisoned. 



Eggs. 

The wholesale egg market has required the entire attention of one inspector. Large 
quantities of unfit eggs have been destroyed and one offender was fined $750. The handling 
of eggs and egg products has been restricted by the enforcement of strict ordinances govern- 
ing this industry, and it is believed that as a result this business has been put on a more 
legitimate basis than it has ever before occupied. Unsound eggs, of course, enter the mar- 
ket in large quantities in the original package. This is an unpreventable occurrence for, 
under stress of weather or on account of the length of time en route, some eggs in each pack- 
age are almost certain to deteriorate. All egg merchants employ "candlers" and the ex- 
amination by the latter is capable of disclosing with great accuracy the presence of unfit 
eggs. The problem is to prevent such eggs from entering the market as food. While the 
honest merchant requires no supervision in this matter, those less scrupulous require to be 
watched constantly, and the records of this division show that vigilance in this direction 
has been productive of good results. Rotten eggs are used legitimately by leather manu- 
facturers in the form of the so-called "tanners' yolk, " and there is no desire on the part of 
this department to interfere with such use of these eggs. Their use in this manner is rather 
to be encouraged for, by offering this method of employing unfit eggs, the desire to dispose 
of them in an illegitimate manner is diminished. 



Oysters. 

During the spring of 1912, a thorough investigation of Jamaica Bay, L. I., and its 
estuaries was made, and samples of water from various parts of the bay during different 
tidal variations were taken for purposes of bacteriological analysis. As a result, "floating, " 
"drinking," or "storing" of shellfish in the waters of Jamaica Bay was prohibited. As a 
result of a similar investigation, no oysters which are "drunk" in Chesquake Creek, N. J., 
are permitted to be sold in this city. All permits "To Keep Oysters For Sale" which were 
in force prior to November 1, 1912, were revoked and dealers were required to obtain new 
permits. In issuing such permits to the wholesale dealers, the department requires that 
the exact location of all beds must be given, together with a statement as to whether 
oysters are ' ' floated, " " drunk, " or " washed, "and the location of the ' ' drinks ' ' and ' ' floats, ' ' 
the location of storehouses must also be stated, and the purity of the water flowing over the 
oyster beds and of the water in which oysters are^" floated" or "drunk" must be proven 
to the satisfaction of the department. 

37 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

The sale of oysters at retail within the City of New York is also conducted under per- 
mits from this department. At the present time, however, only those retail dealers who 
procure their oysters from wholesale dealers located outside the City of New York or from 
those who do not operate under a permit from this department are required to procure per- 
mits. 

Cost of Inspection and Condemnation of Meat. 

Cents. 
Cost of each inspection at stores, markets, depots, etc., where meat is stored and 

sold (not including slaughter-houses) 13 . 49 

Cost of each inspection at premises where animals are slaughtered, and meat is 

kept and offered for sale 27 . 19 

Cost per pound of meat condemned at stores, markets, depots, etc., where meat is 

stored and sold (not including slaughter-houses) 1 . 69 

Cost per pound of meat condemned at premises where animals are slaughtered 

and meat is kept and offered for sale 1 . 76 

Cost per pound of meat condemned at slaughter-houses 1.85 



Cost of Inspection and Condemnation of Foodstuffs. 

(Not Including Meat.) 

Cents. 

Cost of each inspection at wholesale premises 20 . 36 

Cost of each inspection at all inspected premises _ 7.01 

Cost per pound of foodstuffs condemned at wholesale premises o . 03 

Cost per pound of foodstuffs of total amount condemned o . 09 



Inspection Made by all Inspectors and Cost of Same, and Total Cost per Pound of all Food- 
stuffs Condemned. 

Total number of inspections made 5 2 3,73 2 

Total number of pounds of foodstuffs condemned 23,950,321 pounds 

Cost of each inspection by all inspectors 10. 52 cents 

Cost per pound of the total number of foodstuffs condemned 0.16 cent 



Approximate Amount of Foodstuffs Arriving at New York for Consumption in New 

York City, During Year. 

Character of foodstuffs. Pounds. 

Meats (beef, veal, pork, etc.) 684,315,000 

Fish 57,031,250 

Poultry 114,062,500 

Vegetables 684,315,000 

Butter 114,062,500 

Milk 1,368,630,000 

Bread 456,250,000 

Coffee 57,031,250 

Tea 28,515,625 

Fruit (including nuts) 228,125,000 

Sugar (including candy) 142,578,125 

Pastry 114,062,500 

Salt 57,031,250 

Fats 57,031,250 

Cheese 57,031,250 

Eggs 142,578,125 

Canned goods 171,093,750 

Total 4,533,744,375 

38 



FOOD AND MILK INSPECTION. 

Prosecutions for Violations of Various Sections of the Sanitary Code Pertaining to Food' 

Cases pending December 31, 191 1 143 

Cases prosecuted during year 1912 2,259 

2,402 
Disposition. 

Prison sentences 8 

Monetary fines i>9°° 

Sentence suspended 1 73 

Discharged 255 

Disposition pending 66 

Total 2,402 

Amount of Fines. 

Amount of fines imposed $14,070.00 

Prison sentences 195 days 



Violations Prosecuted Under Sections < 


12, 46, 49, 68, 


79 Sanitary Code. 


Section. 


Cases fined. 


S. S. 


Discharged. 


Amount 

of 

fines. 


Section 42 : 

Unwholesome 


117 

10 

103 

82 
12 


24 

3 

24 

18 

2 


25 
1 

31 
20 

4 


$4,455.00 


fish 


43.00 




901.00 




4,812.00 




74.OO 






Total 


324 
268 


71 

37 


81 
17 


$10,285.00 


Section 45 : 

Exposure of 


553.00 






Total 


268 
1,256 


37 
5o 


17 
149 


$553.00 


Section 46: 

Exposure of 

breadstuffs, cake, pastry, 


2,245.00 






Total 


1,256 
3 


50 
3 


149 
4 


$2,245.00 


Section 49: 

Insanitary conditions 


26.00 


Total 


3 
34 


3 
10 


4 
3 


S26.00 


Section 68 : 

Adulterated foods 


870.00 






Total 


34 
15 


10 
2 


3 

1 


$870.00 


Section 79: 

Selling poultry, no permit . . . 


91 .00 


Total 


15 


2 


1 


$91 .00 







39 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

Inspection and Condemnation of Meat — IQI2, iqii. 
City of New York. 





Year 1912. 


Year 191 1. 




Inspec- 
tions. 


Condem- 
nations. 


Pounds 

Con- 
demned. 


Inspec- 
tions. 


Condem- 
nations. 


Pounds 

Con- 
demned. 


Butcher shops .... 
Stores 


9,635 
24,322 

65 
312 

7,331 

256 

2,089 

438 

258 

4,806 

18,318 

19 

5,907 

1 


139 

449 

9 
16 

5 

386 

53 

311 

29,232 

i,799 
4 


18,175 
27,611 

4,182 

967 

861 

38,552 

39,776 

251,130 

699,985 

199,744 

235 


22,694 

9,177 

992 

7,843 

15,285 

726 

1,185 

456 

766 

5,349 

16,312 

666 

4,892 

40 


486 

185 

6 

172 

654 

4 

174 

51 

701 

8,036 

1,603 

20 


27,517 

28,495 

865 

31,345 

83,327 

901 

25,076 

30,660 

198,399 

339,699 

139,156 

3,193 


Packing houses . . . 
Icehouses 


Stands 


Vessels 


Markets 

Railroad depots . . . 

Stockyards 

Slaughter houses . . 
Commission houses 

Fat houses 

Licensed venders . . 
Cow sale stables . . 


Total 


73,757 


32,403 


1,281,218 


86,383 


12,092 


908,633 



Inspection and Condemnation of Fruit, Fish and Other Foods. 
City of New York. 





Year 1912. 


Year 191 1. 




Inspec- 
tions. 


Condem- 
nations. 


Pounds 

Con- 
demned. 


Inspec- 
tions. 


Condem- 
nations. 


Pounds 

Con- 
demned. 


Commission houses 

Retail stores 

Licensed venders. . 
Vessels and wharves 
Railroad depots. . . 
Stands 


31,567 

47,698 

19,641 

7,104 

1,568 

69,885 

1,688 

551 
170,273 


2,384 
2,894 

433 

1,661 

124 

2,882 

897 

29 

2i,34i 


4,366,289 
347,426 

35,973 

16,629,243 

227,921 

78,555 
602,357 

83,255 
228,084 


45,778 
44,986 

37,977 
8,674 
1,199 

104,162 
4,443 
1,339 

144,321 


1,606 

2,595 
512 
941 
156 

i,93i 
299 

35 
10,825 


3,545,840 

362,682 

36,029 

8,354,063 

333,396 

151,298 

141,402 

100,351 

95,947 


Markets 


Icehouses 




Total 


349,975 


32,645 


22,599,103 


392,879 


18,900 


13,121,008 



40 



FOOD AND MILK INSPECTION. 



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41 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



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42 



FOOD AND MILK INSPECTION. 
Summary of Food Samples Obtained and Results of Analyses. 



Samples Obtained and Delivered 
to Chemical Laboratory. 



Found Adulterated. 



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Beans 1 1 

Beef 2 

Beef Croquettes i 

Beverages 12 

Bologna 2 

Boric Acid 2 

Bread 2 

Butter 15 

Cake 3 

Candy 174 

Canned Goods 8 

Catsup 11 

Caviar 1 

Cheese 5 

Chewing Gum 1 

Chicken Salad 1 

Chocolate Compound. 2 

Chopped Meat 199 

Citric Acid 4 

Cocoa 1 

Coffee 10 

Coloring 4 

Condensed Milk 15 

Corn 1 

Cresco 1 

Drugs 55 

Eggs 5 

Egg- Yolk 2 

Fish 3 

Flavoring Extract 21 

Flour 12 

Frankfurters 4 

Gelatine 2 

Ginger Root 1 

Grape- Juice 1 

Hair Restorer 1 

Herb Tablet 1 

Herring 1 

Honey 2 

Ice Cream 3 

Jelly 61 

Ketchup 1 

Lard 1 

Lavender, Spirits of . . 2 

Lavenia 1 

Lemonade 2 

Lithia Water 1 

Liquor 12 

Liverwurst 2 



2 1 

9 2 1 1 

1 1 1 1 ... 

1 

7 3 211 

1 1 

2 ... 2 2 

2 

9 2 I ... 3 1 1 

2 1 1 1 

97 45 12 5 15 4 1 2 ... 1 ... 

6 2 2 2 

8 ... 1 2 ... 2 2 

1 

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1 1 

79 68 26 5 21 28 8 14 3 3 

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3 2 1 1 8 

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29 11 1 14 . . . 3 2 1 

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1 1 ... 1 

1 ' 

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2 

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61 

1 

1 

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1 

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12 12 12 

1 1 



43 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 
Summary of Food Samples Obtained and Results of Analyses — Continued. 



Samples Obtained and Delivered 
to Chemical Laboratory. 



Found Adulterated. 



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d 

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Macaroni 4 3 1 

Meat 17 10 6 

Milk, Powdered 9 4 ... 

Milk Punch 1 1 

Noodles 18 15 ... 

Olive Oil 3 2 ... 

Oil, Vegetable 17 11 1 

Oysters 1 ... 1 

Paregoric 2 2 

Peas 2 1 1 

Pie 1 1 ... 

Prescription 

(Compounded) .... 1 1 

Preserves 3 3 

Salad Dressing 1 ... 1 

Salt I ... 1 

Sardines 2 

Sauce 1 1 

Sesonine 1 1 

Soap Powder 1 1 

Soda 1 ... 1 

Soup 1 1 

Spices 2 1 

Sugar 4 3 1 

Syrup 5 3 1 

Tea 18 6 10 

Tomatoes 4 4 ... 

Tomato Pulp 6 3 3 

Tomato Sauce 1 ... 1 

Vermouth 317 317 

Vinegar 2 1 

Wafers 1 1 

Water 87 77 5 

Whiskey 16 12 2 

Wine 2 2 ... 

Wine-Masala 167 167 . . . 

Wurst 1 1 ... 

Total 1,409 1,042 195 



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1 

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4 4 • 

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1 12 9 

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1 

3 • 







61 49 62 421 380 22 



13 



44 



FOOD AND MILK INSPECTION. 



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45 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 





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46 



FOOD AND MILK INSPECTION. 
Sanitary Branch of the Division of Food Inspection. 

The sanitary branch of the Division of Food Inspection was established for the purpose 
of relieving the Milk and Food Inspectors of the necessity of making sanitary inspections 
in connection with their examination of foodstuffs. This work is at present performed by 
twenty (20) inspectors and one Supervisor. The city is divided into districts and the 
inspectors are held responsible for the conditions within their districts. The greater part 
of the work originates through complaints from citizens, references from other Bureaus 
and Departments, and requests for permits to conduct certain forms of business. The 
Inspectors are required to devote their time to original investigations when not engaged in 
complying with direct orders or investigating complaints. 

For the purpose of this report, all premises where foodstuffs are manufactured, stored 
or sold, will be classed under two headings: 

First: Retail Stores, which comprise 

Restaurants Delicatessen Stores 

Markets Grocery Stores 

Hotels Confectionery Stores 

Bakeries Butcher Stores 

Second: Factories, which comprise the following forms of business: 

a. Breaking out egg yolk for food or other purposes. 

b. Manufacturing confectionery, mineral and carbonated waters. 

c. Preserving and canning fruits and vegetables. 

d. Preparing and preserving meats and fish, manufacturing sausages and main- 
taining smoke houses. 

e. Rendering fat for food and other purposes, utilization of slaughter-house waste 
and manufacturing of fertilizer. 

f. Slaughter houses for poultry, cattle, calves, sheep, lambs, hogs and horses. 

The most important class of business from the viewpoint of this division is the food 
factory, because the greater part of the output of the factories is consumed by the inhabi- 
tants of the City of New York. 

When making inspections of retail stores, the inspectors are chiefly concerned with the 
sanitary conditions. They do not make examinations of foodstuffs, but, in all cases where 
milk is sold without a permit or when foodstuffs are apparently unwholesome or of a sus- 
picious character, a reference is made to the proper Inspector of Foods. 



Factories. 

As previously stated, the factories are considered to be of the greatest importance 
and, for this reason, each class of factory will be treated separately. 

a. Breaking out egg yolk for food and other purposes. — This class of factory, as a rule, 
uses the yolk of eggs, which for various reasons, is considered unfit for human consumption 
in its raw state. Some of the raw material is invariably offensive to the smell and is of such 
a nature as to create extremely insanitary conditions. 

b. The manufacture of confectionery, mineral and carbonated waters. — This class of 
factory is one that requires constant supervision on the part of the Department. The 
manufacturing of confectionery, as is well known, tends to create extremely insanitary 
conditions, which are dangerous from the standpoint of health. The finished product is 

47 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

not packed air-tight, is often allowed to remain exposed to flies and may form a culture 
ground for the bacteria of diseases which are transmitted by the fly. The manufacture of 
ice cream necessitates the use of large quantities of ice, and it is therefore necessary to 
provide proper drainage for the waste water. In the manufacture of mineral and car- 
bonated waters adequate facilities for filtering the water used must be installed. Proper 
appliances for thoroughly cleansing bottles must also be provided. 

c. Preserving and canning fruits and vegetables. — The work of the Department in this 
class of factory may be fully covered by the statement that it insists upon perfect sanitary 
arrangements within the premises, with proper receptacles and adequate arrangements 
for the disposal of waste material. 

d. Preparing and preserving meats and fish, manufacturing sausages and maintaining 
smoke houses. — This class of factory is one that requires constant and careful supervision, 
chiefly because the business is conducted upon a small scale by a class of persons who do 
not seem to realize the necessity of cleanliness and that the use of the smoke house is liable 
to create a nuisance in the adjoining neighborhood. 

e. Fat rendering for food and other purposes, utilization of slaughter-house waste and 
manufacture of fertilizers. — This class of business is most frequently carried on in conjunction 
with cattle, calves, sheep, lamb and hog slaughter houses, but in some instances this is not the 
case. The interior arrangements must be such as to permit of thorough and easy cleansing 
at all portions of the premises. The fats which are rendered for food purposes must be 
kept entirely separate from other fats and the rendering must be done in separate portions of 
the building. 

Chicken Slaughter Souses. 

These slaughter houses are required to be located in buildings which are not used for 
dwelling purposes and in a section which is not thickly populated. The character of the 
neighborhood is also taken into consideration, and in those sections where the religious 
beliefs of the people do not make it necessary to have fowl killed in any particular manner, 
the requirements as to location are more severe. Also in those sections, if there are a 
sufficient number of slaughter houses to serve the population within the area, the conditions 
are again made more stringent. This difference of procedure is explained by the fact that 
even under the most favorable conditions these slaughter houses are the cause of many 
complaints due to the character of the animals handled, and as this business is conducted on 
a small scale with a few irresponsible employees who do not seem to realize the importance 
of scrupulous cleanliness, offensive odors escape unless the greatest care is exercised at 
all times. 

The sanitary inspectors are instructed to visit all poultry slaughter houses within 
their districts at least once a week. 



Cattle, Calves, Sheep, Lambs and Hog Slaughter Houses. 

These slaughter houses are of necessity kept under supervision both by the Food and 
Sanitary Inspectors, for they are liable at any time to become a nuisance to the neighbor- 
hood in which they are located. The possibility of a nuisance arising is not so much due to 
the methods of slaughtering or to the lack of precautions taken to maintain the premises in a 
cleanly condition, as to the reduction and utilization of slaughter-house waste, which is 
carried on in conjunction with the business of slaughtering animals. For this reason one 
Inspector who is thoroughly conversant with all the methods now employed, is perma- 
nentlyjietailed to slaughter houses to the exclusion of all other work. 

48 



FOOD AND MILK INSPECTION. 

The following is a list of the various forms of business for which a permit is required 
by this Department and which are inspected by the Sanitary Inspectors of this Division. 

To keep cows. 

To keep and sell live poultry in crate lots only at wholesale. 

To cart fat and bones (out of town). 

To use well water. 

To keep oysters for sale at retail. 

To keep oysters grown outside the City of New York for sale at wholesale within the 
City of New York. 

To manufacture artificial mineral and carbonated waters. 

To prepare and preserve meats and fish, manufacture sausages and maintain smoke- 
houses. 

To render fat for food and other purposes; utilize slaughter-house waste and manufac- 
ture fertilizer. 

To break out eggs for food and other purposes. 

To conduct slaughter houses for poultry, cattle, calves, sheep, lambs, hogs, horses. 

Food Inspection — Sanitary Supervision* {Complaints, Notices and Orders). 



Complaints — 

Citizens' complaints received 

Complaints received from other Divisions . . 
Complaints filed by Inspectors 

Total complaints 

No cause for action 

Duplicates 

Complaints referred to other Divisions 

Complaints referred to other Departments. . 
Complaints returned for Notice or Order. . . 
Complaints pending at end of year 

Total 

Notices and Orders — 

Notices and Orders issued during year 

Complied with before legal action 

Complied with after legal action 

Rescinded 

Notices and Orders pending (at end of year) 
Number of criminal actions during year. . . . 



Man- 
hattan. 



597 

41 

1,826 



2,464 

541 

41 

17 

25 

1,835 

5 



2,464 



1,792 

1,587 

59 

4 

142 

77 



Brook- 
lyn. 



206 

40 

568 



814 



120 



14 

5 

671 

4 



814 



769 

683 

9 



The 
Bronx. 



38 
4 



273 
3 



275 
262 



Q-ns. S; 



49 

7 

91 



147 
39 



147 
90 



124 
6 



116 
112 



New 
York. 



944 

109 

2,817 



3.870 

744 
45 
34 
33 
3,002 
12 



3,870 



3.042 

2,726 

71 

5 

240 





Man- 
hattan. 


Brook- 
lyn. 


The 
Bronx. 


Queens. 


Rich- 
mond. 


New- 
York. 




No. 


% 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 


No. 


/o 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 


Total- 
Notices and Orders complied 


1,646 
1,171 

377 
98 


100. 

71. 1 

22.9 
5-9 


692 

534 
124 
34 


100. 

77.1 
18.0 

4-9 


264 

156 

76 

32 


100. 
59.1 

28.7 
12. 1 


82 

74 

6 

2 


100. 

90.2 

7.3 
2.4 


113 


100. 


2,797 

2.031 

595 

171 


100. 


Number complied with with- 


96 84.9 
12 10.6 

5 4.4 


72.6 


Number complied with with- 


21.2 


Number complied with not 


6.1 











*From May 27, 19 12. 

49 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



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FOOD AND MILK INSPECTION. 



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5i 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



MILK INSPECTION IN THE CITY. 

Twenty-five inspectors were employed in seeing that the milk entering the city was 
properly handled and safeguarded until it reached the consumer. The magnitude of this 
problem may be realized when it is considered that approximately two million (2,000,000) 
quarts of milk are received daily, that the milk enters at 1 5 different terminals, is inspected 
as delivered in 6,000 wagons, and is dispensed at 14,000 stores and 15,000 restaurants, 
hotels and clubs. 

Of the inspectors assigned to city milk inspection, one was detailed for six months to 
the Division of Laboratories, two for six months to the Division of Communicable Diseases, 
and another to food inspection other than milk. These left practically only twenty-two 
inspectors of foods assigned solely to city milk inspection for the year. 

Enforcement of Grading System. 

On January 4, 1912, the Board of Health adopted certain amendments to the Sani- 
tary Code, and subsequently revised the rules and regulations in order to make effective the 
new classification of milk sold in New York City. 

The first step taken in the enforcement of these rules was to notify the dealers in 
making application for permits, to state which grade or grades they intended to sell. These 
applications were investigated by the Country Division which then recommended that 
permits be granted, according to the grade or subdivision the dairy producing the milk 
came under. After the dealers had received permits they were immediately notified to 
label their milk in accordance with the requirements of their permits. 

It was felt that the success of the plan of grading the milk depended largely upon the 
enforcement of proper labeling, and by September 1, 19 12, practically all the milk sold 
was labeled with the proper grade or designation. 

In view of the fact that it was found that a large percentage of milk received in New 
York City was of the Grade C class, and that to exclude this milk from sale would have 
created a milk famine, the Board of Health amended its regulations for this grade and 
permitted its sale in stores, provided it was properly labeled. Immediately after this 
amendment was put into effect the following signs were posted in stores where Grade C 
milk was sold: 

WARNING. 

The milk sold in this Store is 

fit for cooking Purposes 

only. 

GRADE C 

Displayed by Order of the 
Board of Health. 

These signs were printed in English German, Italian and Yiddish. After these signs had 
been posted by the inspectors, a number' of storekeepers immediately notified their dealers 
that they would not sell Grade C milk, and demanded Grade B, and as a result, the dealers 
redoubled their efforts to get their milk into the Grade B class. 

52 



FOOD AND MILK INSPECTION. 

At the close of 1912, it is estimated that the daily milk supply of New York City may 
be classified as follows: 

Grade A. Quarts. 

1. Certified 12,800 

Guaranteed 2,000 

2. Inspected Milk (Raw) 4,200 

3. Selected Milk (Pasteurized) 12,000 

Grade B. 

1. Selected Milk (Raw) 700,000 

2. Pasteurized Milk 725,000 

Grade C. 

For Cooking 244,000 

Total 1 ,700,000 

Note: The amount of milk sold in the winter months is materially less than that sold 
in summer. 

It is also estimated that within three months the Grade B Pasteurized milk will be increased 
by 200,000 quarts, and in view of the number of requests for reinspections made by dealers 
who desire to get into the Grade B Selected Milk (Raw) class, a material increase will also 
be shown in its figures. 

Control of Stores. 

One of the most difficult problems in the handling of the milk supply and one to 
which a great deal of attention was given in 1912, was the sale of clean milk in clean stores. 

The control of stores has been maintained by means of the permit system. Prior to 
October, 1910, permits were issued for an indefinite period and were good until revoked. 
Since that date all permits expired one year from date of issue. This rule, however, applied 
only to new permits and as no steps had been taken to rescind permits issued prior to 
October, 19 10, one of the first steps to be undertaken in 1912 was the rescinding of all these 
old permits and the issuing of yearly permits. 

The system of scoring stores was also changed, and the requirements were made more 
stringent. The extent to which this work was conducted may be seen from the following 
figures : 

17,994 permits recommended granted 
11,640 permits recommended revoked 

862 prosecutions made for selling milk without a permit 
$1,746.50 fines collected. 

This work in most instances has shown good results, as it has driven out of business a 
number of very dirty stores, has increased materially the amount of bottled milk sold daily 
and has resulted in the establishment of a number of stores solely for the sale of milk. 

Milk Containers. 

Another important feature of milk control, to which considerable attention was given, 
was the question of clean empty containers. The responsibility for unclean containers 
rests as much with the consumer as with the storekeeper and dealer, but up to the present 
time no action has been taken by the Department against the consumer. A large per- 
centage of the consumers, however, are cleaning their bottles, but in some sections of the 
city dealers have found it almost impossible to secure the return of clean containers and 
rather than lose their customers accept the unclean empty containers and have erected 
depots for their cleansing. One company alone spends $25,000 annually for this purpose. 

53 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

The district inspectors have insisted that all storekeepers clean the empty containers. 
If unclean containers are found, the storekeeper is warned and if the containers are subse- 
quently found unclean, prosecution follows. 

During the summer months inspectors were detailed to night duty, and devoted most 
of their time to the inspection of empty containers which were being returned to the coun- 
try. As a result, a number of dealers have employed special men, to inspect empty con- 
tainers as they are unloaded from milk wagons to the railroad platform, and if any unclean 
containers are found they are returned to the depot for cleaning. 

As in former years, a number of samples of milk, cream and condensed milk were col- 
lected for chemical analysis, and whenever the milk was found to be below standard, crim- 
inal proceedings were instituted. Wherever a high bacterial count was found, the dealer 
from whom the samples were taken was notified that immediate steps must be taken to 
remove the conditions causing it. If after repeated warnings the bacterial count continued 
to be excessive, the revocation of the permit was recommended. When milk was found to 
have a temperature exceeding 50 degrees Fahrenheit, it was destroyed. 

During the summer months complaints were received that the milk offered for sale in 
restaurants was very poor. The Commissioner therefore directed that the established 
ruling that milk sold in hotels, restaurants and clubs, was part of a meal and was not 
sold as milk, should be disregarded and that all restaurants be required to have permits lim- 
iting them to the sale of Grade A and Grade B milk. 



City Milk Inspection — 1908 to 191 2. 



1908 



*IpI2 



Inspectors 

Number of Inspections 

Number of specimens examined 

Number of samples of milk taken for chemical 
analysis 

Number of samples of milk taken for bacterio- 
logical examination 

Quarts of milk destroyed 

Permits issued 

Permits revoked for violation of law 



Section 53 — Selling adulterated milk- 
Arrests 

Sentence suspended 

Fines 



109,282 
101,049 

6,268 

7.817 

19,793 

8,27s 

338 



303 



24 
H5>2S0 
98,064 



4.559 

12,678 

7.383 



440 
148 



24 
127,450 
120,928 

10,029 

8,290 

15.715 

8,032 

401 



367 
13s 



23 

104,670 

178,185 

6,527 

20,387 
18,690 
9. 131 
3.907 



227 
107 



Section 55 — Selling adulterated condensed milk — 

Arrests 

Sentence suspended 

Fines 



Section 56 — Selling milk without permit- 
Arrests 

Sentence suspended 

Fines 



Section 57 — Selling adulterated cream- 
Arrests 

Sentence suspended 

Fines 



Section 183 — Unclean milk containers — 

Arrests , 

Sentence suspended , 

Fines 



196 



Total arrests , 

Total cases suspended sentence . 
Amount of fines 



547 
189 

.477 



150 

22 
5r,965 

276 

59 
h.H3 

870 

230 



145 

32 

$2,275 



180 
25 

$679 

692 

197 

$7,439 



$500 



59 
38 

71 



33 

9 

$290 



331 

$1,241 
652 
177 

$5,592 



125,642 
161,326 

8,709 

27,529 
19,577 
17,994 
11,640 



380 
114 



$50 



862 
199 

$1,746.50 



57 

28 

$815 



462 

52 

$1,243.50 

1,761 

361 

5ll,386 



*iFVom September 1, 1912, ten inspectors of foods were assigned temporarily from the County Division 
to thelCity Division. 



54 



FOOD AND MILK INSPECTION. 





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55 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

Milk Inspection in the Country Districts. 

The year 19 12 opened with 33 inspectors detailed to this work. Early in September 
in order to enforce more properly the rules and regulations in regard to labeling, it became 
necessary to somewhat reduce this force and transfer the men to the city. Reductions 
were made from time to time until there were but 16 inspectors left for country work. 

At the beginning of the year, routine systematic inspection was made of dairies irre- 
spective of their class or character. Creameries were visited one after another. The 
dairies patronizing the respective creameries were inspected, and if conditions did not 
indicate that the milk produced or handled was fairly safe and wholesome, steps were taken 
to prevent either dairy or creamery from making shipments to this city. The standard 
required for shipments was based upon the score card now in use, and entailed a minimum 
score of 33 per cent, on methods. Reinspections were undertaken to ascertain whether 
improvements had been made after warnings had been given, and if little or no improve- 
ment had taken place) the dairy's products were excluded. Investigations at creameries 
were continuous in order to insure the exclusion of such dairies. On January 29, 19 12, 
the exclusion of dairies and creameries was discontinued and up to this date two creameries 
and more than two hundred dairies had been excluded. 

The procuring of samples of milk in the country for bacteriological analysis was con- 
ducted by a squad of five men under the charge of a supervisor. Exclusion was enforced 
whenever bacteria counts and dairy scores were found to indicate an improper milk supply. 
This work was practically discontinued on January 15, 1912, although since that date 
samples have been taken from time to time, by district inspectors. 

A change in country milk inspection came with the enforcement of the classification 
system. The decisive step to enforce the present system as outlined in Section 56 and 
56-a of the Sanitary Code and in the rules and regulations amended by the Board of 
Health on January 4, 1912, took place on January 8, 1912, when all milk dealers were 
notified to submit to the Department within ten days a statement showing what grade 
of milk each intended to sell. 

The work from February 1, 19 12, consisted, for the greater part, in the inspection 
and reinspection of dairies for the purpose of enrolling the name under the various desig- 
nations. By August 1, 1912, every dealer had been provided with proper permits, in 
accordance with the new rules and regulations. In many instances seven or eight rein- 
spections were made during the past year, whereas the number of inspections per dairy 
had previously averaged about one in eight months. During the year, 41,292 dairy in- 
spections were made, and about 5,100 of Grade B (Raw) dairies were enrolled. 

Generally speaking, great progress had been made by dealers, in inducing farmers to 
produce Grade B Selected Milk (Raw), which had been augmented by the offer by dealers, 
of a premium for the production of this grade of milk. The paying of a premium has also 
tended to secure a better supply for pasteurization, since numerous dealers are compelled 
to pay this premium for milk produced on dairies sufficiently high for Grade B Selected 
Milk (Raw), even though the milk is pasteurized and sold as Grade B (pasteurized) for 
which no score requirement is set. 

On the other hand, it was found that since the exclusion system had been dropped, 
conditions upon a large number of dairies had again become very unsatisfactory. The 
careless dairyman felt that he could ship his product, if the dealer whom he patronized 
was in a position to transform into Grade B (pasteurized) Milk, or if the dealer could find 
ready sale for the product as Grade C. It was deemed necessary to exercise some re- 
striction on the more insanitary dairies, and a modified exclusion system was again re- 
sorted to, a low limit exclusion point of 40 per cent, total on the score card being fixed. 

As the endeavors of the past year have been devoted principally to such dairies as 
supply dealers desirous of selling Grade B Selected Milk (Raw) in this city, this modified 
exclusion system has acted as a check on only a small part of the total number of dairies 
producing the milk sold in this city. 

56 



FOOD AND MILK INSPECTION. 



Conditions under which Grade C Milk is produced, are to a large degree satisfactory, 
because the bulk of such milk consists of the product of dairies that have fallen somewhat 
short of producing Grade B Selected Milk (Raw). 

To enforce properly the present rules and regulations for the sale of milk makes it 
necessary to establish a method of checking at creameries. It has been found in some 
instances, where permits have been granted for the sale of Grade B Selected Milk (Raw), 
including only a part of the dairies patronizing a creamery, that the entire supply re- 
ceived has been shipped as Grade B Selected Milk (Raw). Detection of improper label- 
ing in such cases is impossible in the city, for there is no way of telling whether the milk 
has been produced upon a dairy entitled to produce the grade of milk mentioned upon the 
label. It is for this reason that checking in the country becomes imperative. There are 
few creameries which cannot obtain and ship a certain amount of Grade B Selected Milk 
(Raw) and the issuance of a permit for a small amount of such milk provides a subterfuge 
for the labeling of the greater quantity of the milk as Grade B. Owing to the small force 
of men available, constant checking is at present impossible. The visit of the inspector 
to the creamery in his routine inspections must, with the exception of isolated cases, be 
depended upon as the only means at the command of the Department at the present time 
to prevent this practice. 

Milk Inspection Outside of the City of New York. 



Dairy. 



Creamery. 



Total. 



Number of inspectors on duty 

Number of inspections 

Number of samples of milk taken for bacterial ex- 
amination 

Number of samples of water taken for chemical 
analysis 

Number of samples of water taken for bacterial 
examination 

Number scoring between i% and 25% 

Number scoring between 26% and 50% 

Number scoring between 51% and 75% 

Number scoring between 76% and 100% 

Average score 

Number of inspections and found business discon- 
tinued 

Number inspections refused 

Number special reinspections 

Number of inspections, milk excluded, from the 
City of New York 

Number of inspections, notified to resume sending 
milk to the City of New York 

Number infectious diseases investigated 

Number cows examined by veterinarian 



32,269 

21,532 

22 

17 

484 

11,116 

15.401 

1,638 



7,317 

1,303 

707 

119 

16,150 



41.292 
1,397 



427 

10,119 

23,736 

5.486 

60.03 

179 
105 

2,664 



143 
7.943 



2,5U 

1,229 

10 

44 

3 

122 

1,125 

1,013 

73-31 

48 

5 

768 



1,909 

727 
5 

53 

2 

86 

504 

814 

7404 

17 

5 

349 



33 
34.783 

22,761 

32 

61 

487 

11,238 

16,526 
2,651 



32 

43.201 

2,124 

13 

54 

429 

10,205 

24,240 
6,300 



258 

132 

8,085 



707 

139 

16,150 



196 

no 

3.013 



75 

150 

7.943 



Pasteurization of Milk. 

During the past year the practice of pasteurizing milk for sale in the City of New York, 
increased very greatly and the work of its supervision and control called for increased effort. 

The resolution of the Board of Health which went into effect on January 1, 19 12, and 
by which the milk sold in New York was regarded and classified as "Grade A-B-C" pro- 
duced two striking results. 

First, those dealers who believed that the sale of raw milk was preferred to the sale 
of pasteurized milk, made greater efforts to induce the farmers to place their farms in such 
a satisfactory condition that they would be scored on the Department score card suffi- 
ciently high to permit them to come within the class of farms allowed to produce "Grade B 
Selected Milk (Raw)." 

Secondly, those dealers who favored the sale of pasteurized milk were induced to equip 
more plants for this purpose and to increase their output. Those dealers also who after 

57 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

making considerable effort found that they were not able to produce "Grade B Raw Milk," 
and who also found that the demand for "Grade C Milk" was small and growing smaller, 
were induced to equip plants with pasteurizing apparatus in order that the milk for which 
they found no sale, could, by pasteurization, be converted into "Grade B Milk." 

At the beginning of the year, permits for the pasteurization of milk had been granted 
only to plants located within the city or its immediate surroundings. There were probably 
six or eight plants outside the city equipped with milk heating and holding apparatus, but 
none of them was in condition to comply fully with the requirements of the Department. 
At that time there were eighteen pasteurizing plants within the city, at which about 
270,000 quarts of milk were pasteurized daily, most of which was sold in bottles and very 
little in bulk. At the end of the year, six new pasteurizing plants, at which about 95,000 
quarts of milk were pasteurized daily, had been equipped within the city, and the plants 
previously equipped had increased their daily output by at least 25,000 quarts. During 
the year, permits to pasteurize milk outside the city were granted to thirty-four plants 
and applications were made for permits by 20 additional plants which had been equipped to 
pasteurize milk. By the end of the year 336,000 quarts of milk were being pasteurized daily, 
outside the city. About 40 per cent, of the entire milk supply is at present pasteurized. 

The heating and the holding of the milk must comply with the regulations of the 
Department of Health as indicated by the following table: 

No less than 158 degrees for at least 3 minutes. 
No less than 155 degrees for at least 5 minutes. 
No less than 152 degrees for at least 10 minutes. 
No less than 148 degrees for at least 15 minutes. 
No less than 145 degrees for at least 18 minutes. 
No less than 140 degrees for at least 20 minutes. 

It has been recommended that the milk be heated to a temperature somewhat higher, 
and held for a period of time somewhat longer than indicated in this table in order to 
provide a sufficient margin of safety, and allow for possible variations in the temperature, 
and in the time for which the milk is held. 

Over 400 inspections of pasteurizing plants nearly equally divided between the city 
and the country districts, were made during the year and 20 permits for pasteurizing plants 
in the city and 34 permits in the country were granted. 

Milk Inspection — Complaints. 



pq 



3 



X 



Complaints pending (December 31, 1911) 15 

Citizens' complaints received 219 

Complaints received from other divisions 

Inspectors' complaints filed 

Total complaints 234 

No cause for action 225 

Duplicates 

Complaints referred to other divisions 

Complaints returned recommending prosecution. 3 

Complaints returned recommending denial of 

application for permit 

Complaints returned recommending revocation of 

permit 2 

Complaints pending (December 31,1912) 4 

Total 234 



13 
107 



1 

1 

122 



3 

64 

4 

1 

72 

65 
1 



72 



31 
421 

4 

3 

459 

430 

1 

10 

7 



3 

7 
459 



58 



FOOD AND MILK INSPECTION. 



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59 



DIVISION OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

During 1912 a new form of postal card, on which appeared a list of the diseases to be 
reported, was issued to physicians for the reporting of contagious diseases, and every 
report was acknowledged by an official postal. In previous years it had been customary 
to acknowledge only reports of diphtheria, scarlet fever and measles, and these acknowledg- 
ments were formerly conveyed by means of a circular which contained the rules of the de- 
partment relating to these diseases. On January 1, 19 12, 23 district medical inspectors 
were dropped from the Division of Contagious Diseases, leaving 22 on the roll, and 30 reg- 
istered nurses were appointed who were required, under the direction of district medical 
inspectors, to make the necessary revisits to cases of contagious disease. This change 
in the method of isolating and inspecting cases of contagious disease at their homes has 
not been entirely satisfactory. During those months of the year in which large numbers 
of cases of contagious disease were reported, there was considerable delay in their termina- 
tion and it frequently became necessary to obtain assistance from the Division of Child 
Hygiene and to invoke the aid of the diagnosticians. 

On December 5th an automobile ambulance was placed in commission at the Depart- 
ment stable, foot of East Sixteenth Street, Borough of Manhattan, and is used to convey 
cases of contagious disease from the outlying portions of all the boroughs to the Willard 
Parker Hospital in Manhattan and the Kingston Avenue Hospital in Brooklyn. It has 
proved to be a valuable addition to the hospital service and, especially on long hauls, 
shortens the period of conveyance very materially. An electric ambulance has also been 
ordered and will probably be placed in commission during the early part of 1913. 

Disinfection. 

During the year a change was made in the method of terminating cases of diphtheria 
and measles, and new regulations have been put in force. Experience has shown that diph- 
theria bacilli, as a rule, die out in a short time after drying and exposure to light, and that 
when a person suffering from diphtheria has completely convalesced and the throat is free 
from diphtheria bacilli there is little likelihood of any infection from the sickroom. Condi- 
tions, however, are quite different when the patient is removed from the sickroom at the 
height of the illness, or when death occurs at this time. Under these conditions, it is prob- 
able that fresh discharges are present, and that these contain living diphtheria bacilli. The 
action of the department, therefore, depends upon the circumstances attending the termi- 
nation of the case and the period at which this takes place. 

(1) If the patient completely convalesced in the sickroom, the department does not 
perform disinfection, but insists that the apartment be thoroughly cleaned and aired. After 
recovery of the patient at home, the woodwork of the room in which the patient has been 
isolated must be thoroughly scrubbed with hot soda solution (one-half pound to three 
gallons) and the room thoroughly aired for at least twenty-four hours before being again 
occupied. Goods will be removed to the Department of Health Disinfection Station for 
sterilization and will then be returned. 

(2) If the patient is removed from the sickroom during the height of the illness or 
dies at this period, the room with its contents will be disinfected, and all goods exposed to 
the contagion will be removed to the Department of Health Disinfection Station and re- 
turned after disinfection by steam. Bedding or other infected goods from such infected 
rooms must not be taken from the house or thrown into the street by the owner. After 
the goods have been removed and the premises reinspected, if conditions are found satisfac- 
tory, the inspector will issue the necessary school permits. Children in the family are not 

60 



CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

allowed to attend school until they have received a certificate from the Department of 
Health. 

Experience has shown that there is little likelihood of any infection from the sickroom 
or when the person suffering from measles has completely convalesced. The main danger, 
as already stated, is from fresh discharges. So far as disinfection is concerned, therefore, 
the action of the department depends upon the manner and period of termination. 

The regulations are the same as those for diphtheria with the exception that, in the 
case of measles, the department does not remove goods for sterilization. 

This method has proved very satisfactory and the wisdom of the change has been 
shown by the appreciation of the public and the absence of secondary cases. 



Animal Inspection. 





New 
York. 
1911. 


New 
York. 
1912. 


Man- 
hattan. 


Brook- 
lyn. 


The 

Bronx. 


Queens. 


Rich- 
mond. 


Number of veterinarians on duty. 
Horses — 

Examinations of horses 

Blood specimens taken 

Horses tested with mallein . . 

Glandered horses condemned 


9 

34.790 
616 
431 

1,138 

66 
1,090 
1,350 

4,509 
330 


9 

35,36i 

1,049 

372 

1.479 

137 

7.823 

5i8 

6,386 

599 

3.603 
280 

241 

163 

58 


4 

28,768 
570 
162 

676 

15 

6,010 

360 

I.33I 
125 

1,633 

14 
21 

131 
58 


2 

2,118 
71 
94 

444 

76 

627 

9 

829 

131 

845 
50 
66 


1 

1,669 
193 

88 

214 

21 
738 

148 

652 

119 

588 
12 
41 

3 


1 

939 

18 
25 

135 

20 
266 

1 

1.463 

223 

433 
203 

45 

2 


1 

1,867 

197 

3 


Post-mortem examinations 


5 
182 


Inspections of stables 


Dogs — 

Animals kept under observa- 


2,111 


Persons examined for dog 
bite 


104 








212 

4,179 

1 


68 


Cows — 


27 


Cows tested with tuberculin. 















Department Stables, iqii-iqi2. 





New 
York. 
1911. 


New 
York, 
1912. 


Man- 
hattan, 
1912. 


Brook- 
lyn, 
1912. 


The 
Bronx, 
1912. 


Queens, 
1912. 


Rich- 
mond, 
1912. 


Ambulance Drivers — 

Cases removed to hospitals. 


6,278 

43 

6,080 


6,816 

19 

5.615 


3.693 

11 
1. 341 


1.993 

7 

3.652 


1,023 

I 

622 






Bodies removed to morgue. . 




















12,401 


12,450 


5.045 


S.652 


1,646 




107 






Goods Wagon Drivers — 

Visits, infected goods re- 
Visits, disinfected goods re- 


33,122 

29,449 
6,632 


29,181 

25,212 
10,297 


11,869 

10,613 

4.74S 


11,274 

9,220 
1,257 


4.366 

3,896 
1. 542 


1,238 

1,087 
2,325 


434 

396 
428 






69,203 


64,690 


27,227 


21,751 


9.804 


4,650 


1.25^ 




Stable Sendee — 

Average number of horses 


65 

62 
3 


60 
56 

4 


14 

13 
1 


20 
20 


12 

10 
2 


9 

S 

1 


5 
5 


For ambulances and goods 











61 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 
Goods Disinfected and Destroyed. 



Lots of 


goods 


Lots of 


goods 


disinfected. 


destroyed. 


1912. 


1911. 


1912. 


1911. 


16,010 


16,337 


1,441 


1,328 


41,350 


36,265 


865 


1,183 


4,134 


4,026 


341 


289 


1,095 


1,438 


147 


170 


396 


490 


38 


34 



Manhattan . 
Brooklyn . . 
The Bronx. 
Queens. 
Richmond. . 

New York . . 



62,985 58,556 



2,832 



3,004 



Disinfection of Premises, iqii-iqi2. 





New 
York, 
1911. 


New 
York, 
1912. 


Man- 
hattan. 


Brook- 
lyn. 


The 
Bronx. 


Queens. 


Rich- 
mond. 


Number of disinf ectors on duty . . 
Houses visited — 

Disinfection performed 

Disinfection postponed 


42 

51.570 

2.571 
8l,475 


39 

56,612 

5.324 

84,878 


21 

27,626 
3,43o 
44.946 


9 

17,130 

907 

22,787 


5 

7.404 

579 

11,191 


3 

3,459 

407 
4.510 


1 

993 

1 
T ,111 






Disinfections performed — 


11,290 

13,077 

16,892 

22 

8,717 

140 

1,189 


9.376 
10,059 
24,315 

20 
9,906 

114 

r,532 

1 

82 

25 

1,182 


4,210 

4,755 

10,707 

2 

6,268 

77 

835 


3.H2 

3,458 

8,084 

16 

2,027 

22 

366 

1 

9 


1,390 

1,290 

3,538 

2 

931 

10 

199 


452 

425 

1,535 


212 
131 




451 


Tuberculosis 

Cerebrospinal meningitis. . . . 


506 
4 

114 


174 

I 

18 








57 


28 

24 
720 


31 


9 

1 
413 


s 






Miscellaneous 


186 


35 


13 


1 


Total 


5L570 


56,612 


27,626 


17,130 


7.404 


3.459 


993 




628 


870 


198 


223 


7i 


331 


47 







Vaccinations. 



Vaccinations per- 
formed. 



Certificates is- 
sued. 



1912. 



1911. 



1912. 



1911. 



Manhattan . 
Brooklyn . . 
The Bronx. 

Queens 

Richmond. . 

New York . . 



27,563 


81,141 


7,935 


io,437 


21,231 


25,651 


5,976 


5,466 


10,210 


10,233 


5,221 


4,i5i 


1,694 


5,580 


1,121 


1,127 


294 


288 


185 


150 



60,992 122,893 



20,438 



21,331 



62 



CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 





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63 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



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64 



CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 



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65 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Y 

Os 



■s^ox 


Csl N N ft •$■ Os 
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66 



CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 



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67 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



O 



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68 



CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 



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69 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



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Cases reported during year 

Corrected totals of cases re- 
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Cases quarantined at home 

Cases treated in contagious dis- 
ease hospitals 


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70 



DIVISION OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 

During 19 1 2 three new bureaus were established in the Division of Communicable 
Diseases. The first was charged with the supervision of typhoid fever, cerebrospinal 
meningitis, and acute poliomyelitis, and the second, with the control of venereal diseases, 
while the third was a bureau of supplies, requisitions and accounts. 

Moving picture exhibits were given in the city parks throughout the summer, with 
the assistance of the Committee for the Prevention of Tuberculosis of the Charity Organiza- 
tion Society. An exhibit was prepared for the International Congress on Hygiene and 
Demography which took place in Washington, D. C, during September. An exhibit 
was also provided for the Association of Tuberculosis Clinics. 

The following new publications were issued during the year: 

Monograph No. 1 . — The Registration and Sanitary Supervision of Pulmonary 
Tuberculosis in New York City. 

Monograph No. 2. — The Tuberculosis Clinics and Day Camps of the Depart- 
ment of Health. 

New circulars of instruction and information: 

1. Cerebrospinal Meningitis. 

2. Circular of Information Regarding Acute Poliomyelitis (Infantile Paraly- 
sis) (information for the public). 

3. Circular of Information Regarding Acute Poliomyelitis (Infantile Paraly- 
sis) (information for physicians). 

4. Circular of Information Regarding Venereal Diseases. 

5. Circular of Information Regarding Immunization Against Typhoid Fever. 
New editions of the Handbook of Division of Communicable Diseases and 

of the Handbook of Help for Consumptives. 

A series of weekly lectures for the instruction of nurses of the sanitary bureau was 
organized and delivered. These were given with the assistance of the School of Philan- 
thropy, Teachers' College, The Nurses' Settlement and the Charity Organization Society 



1910 



1911 



1912 



Inspectors on duty 

Days on duty 

Nurses on duty 

Days on duty 

Total inspections 

Total cases communicable diseases reported 
Total number employees , 



28 

6,593 

130 

23,803 

204,023 

28,151 

366 



28 

6,571 

114 

22,776 

195,622 

23,091 

359 



27 

6,190 

9i 

18,542 

178,824 

24,398 

362 



The reduction in the number of district nurses is due to the fact that a number of 
nurses were detailed to duty in the branch registration offices. There is a corresponding 
diminution in the number of inspections by nurses. It will be noticed that the total num- 
ber of cases of communicable diseases reported was slightly greater than "in 191 1. 



Tuberculosis. 

The system of branch registration offices, which was introduced in the latter part of 
191 1, was extended throughout the entire city and new branch offices were established 
at Centre and Walker streets, 80th street and Broadway, 22 Vandam street, and at 229 

71 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

East 57th street, all in the Borough of Manhattan. The office at 22 Vandam street 
serves also as a clinic. All the tuberculosis clinics of the department were consolidated, 
and each was placed in direct relation with its branch office, with a physician in charge 
to direct all tuberculosis work in the district. A simplified and more complete system of 
recording cases of tuberculosis was introduced. While the number of cases of tuberculosis 
in the register increased from 27,000 in 191 1 to 32,000 in 1912, 1,500 fewer new cases were 
reported. The number of deaths was slightly greater than in 191 1. Careful studies in 
regard to the number of tuberculous children in New York City were undertaken during 
the year and the results will be published later. Although the staff of district nurses was 
decreased from 114 to 91, 3,000 more visits were paid to new cases in 1912. The visiting 
of very ill, delinquent, and undiagnosed cases at their homes is now done by the attending 
physicians of the tuberculosis clinics, and the increased number of visits during 1912 illus- 
trates the advantage of this new system. A decrease in the number of cases under obser- 
vation from 7,413 on October 1, 191 1, to 2,159 on October 1, 1912, was due to the distinc- 
tion now made between cases under close sanitary supervision and those under periodical 
observation only. Almost as many visits were made by the physicians of the clinics as 
by the former staff of inspectors. During 1912 the staff of tuberculosis inspectors was 
abolished and their places taken by the physicians of the clinics. A new clinic was opened 
on May 6th at 22 Vandam street, Manhattan, replacing the Morgagni clinic. The clinics 
in Brooklyn and Queens joined the Association of Tuberculosis Clinics. The clinics at 
81 Second street and 307 West 33rd street were renovated throughout. 

A number of entertainments were given on public holidays for the children in the clinics. 



Day Camps. 

During 19 12 the old ferryboat "Rutherford," which is used as a day camp for tuber- 
culosis, was renovated throughout and new plumbing, shelters, etc., were installed. The 
"Rutherford" was removed permanently to a more satisfactory dock at the foot of Fulton 
street, Brooklyn. A number of entertainments were given for children and patients at 
the camps. 



Cases in attendance Jan. 1st 

New cases received 

Cases discharged 

Cases in attendance Oct. 1st 




1912 



146 
405 
387 
164 



Four hundred and five new cases were received during 19 12 as compared with 293 
cases in 191 1. 

Clinic Relief Committees. 

Clinic relief committees composed of the physician in charge and representatives 
of the auxiliary and of various charitable organizations were organized at the larger clinics. 
A Woman's Auxiliary of the Manhattan Tuberculosis Clinics took over the Chelsea Day 
Nursery at 346 West 37th street. A clinic physician and a department nurse were detailed 
to assist in the work. 

Hospital Admission Bureau. 

The two buildings used for this purpose were renovated throughout and electricity 
was installed in the one situated at 424 First avenue. The physician in charge was ap- 
pointed an official examiner for the preventorium for children and for the New York 
Hospital for Incipient Tuberculosis at Ray Brook, N. Y. Two physicians were detailed 
to the Department of Charities to assist in the work. 



72 



COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. 



Total number of cases admitted to hospitals 

Total number of cases discharged from hospitals 

(discrepancies due to deaths in hospitals) 

Total number of cases admitted to Otisville Sanatorium 

Total number of cases discharged from Sanatoria 

Total number of cases forcibly removed to Riverside Sanatorium. 

Total number of applicants for hospital care 

Total number of persons refusing hospital care 



1911 



8,663 


9.326 


6,035 


6,539 


680 


783 


525 


683 


43 


63 


6,959 


7,053 


506 


436 



1912 



Typhoid Fever. 

An advisory committee of expert sanitarians was appointed during 1912, and has been 
of the greatest assistance in connection with the sanitary supervision of typhoid fever. 
Among the changes in procedure recommended by this committee and which have been 
put into effect are as follows: 1. The Sanitary Code has been amended so as to require 
superintendents of hospitals to report all cases of typhoid fever. 2. All inspections of 
sources of milk supply in the city and the country in connection with typhoid fever are 
now made by the Division of Communicable Diseases. 3. All physicians are required to 
furnish reasons for delayed reports. About 400 fewer cases of typhoid fever were reported 
in 1912 than in 191 1, notwithstanding a sharp outbreak in the Borough of Brooklyn, 
especially in the Bay Ridge section, during the late summer which was probably caused 
by infected milk. There was also a well-marked outbreak in the Woodhaven section 
of the Borough of Queens which was probably due in part to an infection of the water 
supply. The milk supply responsible in Bay Ridge was very likely also responsible for 
some of the Queens Bcrough cases. The morbidity of typhoid fever in the Boroughs 
of Manhattan and The Bronx was lower than it has been for years. • 

Cerebrospinal Meningitis. 

All cases of this disease except those reported from hospitals are visited by a physician 
from the Research Laboratory and lumbar puncture and serum treatment are performed 
with the approval of the attending physician. A new circular of information was prepared 
and issued. 

. Acute Poliomyelitis. 

A new circular of information was prepared and issued. In 191 1, 128 cases of this 
disease were reported and in 1912, 344. This apparent increase was probably due to the 
increased attention paid to the disease by the medical profession. Its incidence in 19 12 
probably did not actually exceed that of 191 1. Cases are kept in quarantine by inspectors 
of the Division of Communicable Diseases for a period of six weeks. 



Venereal Diseases. 

By resolution of the Board of Health, February 20, 1912, all public institutions were 
required to report all cases of venereal diseases coming under their observation after May 
1st. The Wassermann or diagnostic clinic was transferred from the Research Laboratory 
to much larger quarters at Centre and Walker streets on December 2, 1912, where clin- 
ics are held to obtain material for the Complement Fixation Tests for syph ilis, gonorrhoea 
and glanders, daily, from 9 to 10 a. m. 





Syphilis. 


Chancroid. 


Gonorrhoea. 


Number of cases reported from May 1 to 
Dec. 31, 1912 


2,124 


288 


2,418 





73 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

Diphtheria A ntitoxin. 

More work was performed by the individual antitoxin inspectors during 1912 than 
during 191 1 for the reason that it was found necessary to reduce the staff by detailing 
permanently two inspectors to duty in the typhoid bureau. The work was, nevertheless, 
well done, and the case fatality of diphtheria which was 9.5% in 191 1 sank to 8.3% in 1912. 

Diagnosis Laboratory. 

The microscopical agglutination test for glanders proving unsatisfactory, this work 
was transferred to the Research Laboratory where tests for this disease are now made by 
the Complement Fixation method. The work will be retransferred to the Diagnosis Lab- 
oratory during 1913. During the year the antiformin method of sputum examination was 
at last introduced. The number of examinations of sputum during 191 2 exceeded that of 
191 1 by about 10,000, and the number of examinations of blood and urine for typhoid 
fever exceeded those of the previous year by about 6,000. The number of diagnostic 
outfits prepared during 19 12 more than doubled those of 191 1, and the number of supply 
stations for diagnostic outfits was increased from 483 to 512. 

Tuberculosis — General Figures — 1908 to 1912, inclusive. 



Year. 



New York — 

1908 

1909... 

1910 

1911 

1912 

Manhattan— 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

Brooklyn — , 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

The Bronx 
1908 . . . 
1909.... 

1910 

1911 

1912 

Queens — 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

Richmond — 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 



GO. 



S O 

« a, 

* PS 



21,365 
23.570 
29,256 
22,396 
20,790 



13,357 
15,399 
19,432 
14,153 
12,721 



5,824 
6,057 
7,068 

5,568 
5,336 



1.393 

1,437 
1,899 
1,688 
1.872 



56l 
549 
682 
773 
651 



230 
128 
175 

214 
210 



•* 2 

Ph ■£ °> 

S M ^ 

<5<3§ 



1,960 
2,097 
2,809 
2,117 
1,962 



1,377 
1,478 
1,948 
1,348 
1,208 



409 

350 
524 

498 
492 



93 

164 



171 
128 



37 

76 

118 

78 



44 
29 
31 



36 



23.325 
25.667 
32,065 
24.513 
22,752 



14.734 
16,877 
21,380 
15,501 
13.929 



6,233 
6,407 
7,592 
6,066 
5.828 



1,486 
1,601 
2,087 
1,859 

2,000 



598 
625 
800 
851 

749 



274 
157 
206 
236 
246 



aj o rt 

U a 3 

No 
4! 'SO, 



a> v. 



S.27 
562 
6.67 
4.92 
4.02 



6.42 

7-17 
9.13 
6.49 

5-22 



4-17 
4. 16 
4.61 
3-54 
3.004 



4-54 
4.60 
4-75 
3.85 
3-52 



2-57 
2.56 
2.78 
2.75 
1.95 



3- 60 

2.04 
2.40 
2.65 
2.28 



3,870 
3.643 
3,692 
3,790 
3,591 



4.423 
4.20s 
3,975 
4,221 
4,068 



2,484 
2,347 
2,430 
2,464 
2,441 



1,508 
1,623 
1,781 
1,573 
1.580 



283 
309 
358 
36l 
357 



172 
159 

148 



2.01 
I.89 
I. 8l 
I.76 

1.66 



1.93 
1.78 
1.70 
1.77 
1.67 



. 66 

.52 



■44 
• 37 



4.61 
4.66 
4-05 

326 



1.22 
I.26 
1.24 
1. 16 
1.07 



.26 

■04 
■ 71 

.92 
■SO 



♦Excluding duplicates. 



74 



COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. 
Tuberculosis. 

CITY OF NEW YORK. 



Register — Living Cases. 

Cases enrolled at beginning of year 

Under care of private physicians 

♦Under care of dispensaries or clinics 

At home and under supervision of department . 

In institutions in city 

In institutions outside city 

tNot found at address given 

New (living) cases reported 

By physicians 

By sputum 

By institutions 

Cases received from other boroughs 

Old cases resumed 



Total living cases enrolled . 



Cases removed from register during year 

Deaths 

Removals from city 

fNot found ; held for 2 years 

Recovered 

Cases enrolled at end of year 

Under care of private physicians 

Under care of dispensaries or clinics 

At home and under supervision of department . 

In institutions in city 

In institutions outside city 

tNot found at address given 



Total . 



29,736 
6,093 
2,189 
8.748 
3.401 
534 
8.771 

23.570 
3.806 
4.309 

IS,36S 



703 



54.009 



17.357 

7.722 

1.688 

7.421 

526 

36,652 
5. 843 
5.476 

11,863 

3.98o 

802 

8,688 



36,652 



36,652 

5,843 
5.476 

11.863 

3,98o 

802 

8,688 

29.256 
4.915 
3.853 

20,884 



1.543 



67.451 



39.974 
9,246 
4.659 

24,222 
1.847 

27,477 
2,838 
5,762 
6,056 
3.648 
2.445 
6,728 



27.477 



27,477 
2,838 
5.762 
6,056 
3.648 
2.445 
6,728 

22,396 
3.736 
3,845 

14.815 



5.248 



55. 121 



22,486 
7,244 
2,735 
7,454 
5.053 

32,635 
3.591 
2,671 

10,207 
3.300 
2,001 

10,865 



32,635 



32,635 
3.591 
2.671 

10,207 
3.300 
3.001 

10,865 

20,790 
3.318 
3.38s 

14,087 

824 

3.315 



57,564 



26,352 
7.828 
3.455 
4.227 

10,842 

31,212 
3.035 
2,224 

10,488 
4.716 
2,580 
8.169 



31.212 



District Inspection. 
Inspectors: 

Premises visited on account of: 

{Deaths 

§Cases removing to hospitals 

§ Cases removing from city 

§Cases changing address 

Cases "at home" visited on complaint. 

Suspected cases 

Miscellaneous 

Forcible removals 



Total cases inspected . . 

Home visits by clinic physicians. 

Inspections by clinic physicians . 

Visits to cases inspected 



6,296 
8,816 
793 
800 
868 
804 



748 
1. 45 1 



339 

1.503 



23.S83 



6,196 



Total visits by inspectors 

Nurses : 

Total new assignments 

Of which new cases 

Of which old cases 

Total revisits and extra visits 

Total visits by nurses 

Total months all "at home" cases under observation by 
district nurses 

Visits to cases "at home" under observation 

Average visits per month per case "at home" under ob- 
servation 

Visits to investigate or trace cases 



23.583 



6,196 



37 
408 
455 

72 



2,474 
1,821 



1,074 
2.596 



2.4 
9.401 



Total visits by district nurses. 



26,109 



Disposition of Cases: 

Forcible removal to hospital 

References of cases to hospitals 

References of cases to charitable organizations. . . 
Renovations compelled by inspectors' complaints. 

Renovations made voluntarily 

Disinfections of premises ordered 

Disinfections of goods ordered 



25 
427 
179 
2,011 
3.715 
4.365 
5,362 



5.267 

46,722 

22,909 

23,813 

164,151 

210,873 



241,181 



226,859 



210,873 



27 
1,263 
1,411 
2,397 
12,411 
6,058 
5.923 



68 

747 
977 

2,522 

9.572 

8,796 

7,021 



72 

SI4 

1,208 

1,327 

9,908 

10,226 

7.987 



* Other than the Department clinics. 

t Held in current register 2 years; after that time, removed to files. 

t From any one of several files; or not previously reported. 

§ From any one of several files. 

75 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Tuberculosis Clinics. 

CITY OF NEW YORK. 



1 
1909. 


1910. 


1911. 1912. 


Diagnosis: 

Under observation for diagnosis January 1 . . . . 
New patients examined during year 


857 
10,068 

915 


762 

17,274 
1,272 


800 

16,562 

2,934 


890 
14,700 

2,885 


Readmitted for diagnosis 




Total 


11,840 


19,308 


20,296 


18,475 




Found not tuberculous and discharged 

Suspected cases transferred to other clinics. . . . 


L337 


3,013 
i,343 
9,140 
5,012 
800 


6,114 

i,344 

6,099 

6,099 

640 


7,219 

756 

6,001 


Found tuberculous 


5,444 

4,297 

762 


Discontinuing, not coming for diagnosis 

Under observation for diagnosis December 31.. 


3,713 
786 


Total 


11,840 


19,308 


20,296 


18,475 




Cases Under Treatment: 

Under treatment January 1 

New cases coming under treatment 


2,257 
10,068 

3,534 


2,240 

17,274 

5,H4 


2,981 

16,562 

9,027 


3,497 
14,700 

8,743 


Old cases readmitted 


Total 


15,859 


24,628 


28,570 


26,940 


Found not tuberculous and discharged 

Deaths 


1,337 
134 

2,953 

336 

305 

672 

7,882 

2,240 


3,oi3 

138 

5,268 

455 

198 

508 

12,067 

2,981 


6,111 

138 

3,104 

5io 

281 

520 

14,898 

3,008 


7,226 
216 


Transferred to other clinics 


i,774 

1,034 

613 

707 

n,34i 

4,029 


Entered hospitals 


Entered sanatoria 


Discontinued, not found 


Under treatment December 31 




Total 


15,859 


24,628 


28,570 


26,940 


Total visits of patients 








100,764 


Total treatments of patients 

Average visit per months per patient 


53,631 
2.38 

70,983 
674 
225 


77,564 
4-5 

85,044 
862 
465 


92,593 


Prescriptions filled for clinic patients 

Referred for hospital treatment 

Referred for charitable aid 


H7,949 


123,661 






Home visits by clinic physicians 




2,474 













Cerebrospinal Meningitis, General Figures and Inspection — -IQI2. 



New 

York. 


Man- 
hattan. 


Brook- 
lyn. 


Bronx. 


Queens. 


250 


154 


57 


29 


10 


.04 


.06 


.03 


■ 05 


.02 


196 


128 


35 


21 


9 


.03 


.05 


.02 


• 03 


.02 


546 


340 


129 


41 


31 


148 


III 


23 


7 


7 


90 


61 


20 


3 


6 



Rich- 
mond. 



Cases reported 

Cases per 1,000 of population. . 
♦Deaths 

Deaths per 1,000 of population. 

Total inspections 

Disinfection of premises 

Di sinfection of goods ordered 



* Deaths in this table include deaths from other forms of meningitis. 

76 



COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. 



Typhoid Fever, General Figures and Inspection — IQI2. 



New- 
York. 



Man- 
hattan. 



Brook- 
lyn. 



Bronx. 



Queens. 



Rich- 
mond. 



3.076 



499 
16. 



Cases reported 

Cases per 1,000 of population. . 
Deaths from typhoid 

Case fatality, per cent 

Deaths per 1 , 000 of population . 

Cases inspected I 3,076 

Visit to cases 9,621 

Disinfection of goods ordered 148 

Disinfections of premises ordered 43 



.59 



1. 184 

192 
16. 

1,184 

5,012 

58 



.48 



1,284 

231 
17. 

1,284 

2,960 

55 



256 
.48 
26 
10. 1 
.05 
256 
587 
14 
5 



309 
.92 
48 
15. 5 
.14 
309 
9S5 
13 
6 



43 
•46 
2 

4.6 

.02 

43 

107 

8 

3 



Diphtheria, General Figures — 1908-1912 Inclusive. 



Year. 



Cases 
Reported. 



Cases per 

1,000 of 

Population. 



Deaths. 



Deaths 
per 1,000 of 
Population. 



Cases 
Fatality 
Per Cent. 



Per Cent, of 
Cases Re- 
ported In- 
jected at 
Home by 

Department 
of Health. 



New York — 
1908. . . 
1909.. . 
1910. . . 
1911. . . 
1912. . . 

Manhattan — 
1908. . . 

1909 

1910. . . , 
1911. . . . 
1912. . . . 

Brooklyn — 
1908 

1909 

1910 

1911. . . . 
1912. . . . 

The Bronx— 
1908. . . . 

1909 

1910. . . . 
1911. . . . 
1912 

Queens — 
1908. . . . 

1909 

1910. . . . 
191 1. . . 
1912. . . . 

Richmond — 
1908. . . 

1909 

1910. . . 
1911 . . . 
1912. . . 



16,431 
15,097 
16,940 
13.485 
13.533 



8,263 
7,933 
8,990 
6,5H 
6,246 



S.45I 
4.735 
5,023 
4,492 
4.678 



1,648 
1,335 
1,696 
1,496 
1,679 



785 
764 
992 
777 
680 



284 
330 
239 
209 
250 



3-71 
331 
3.52 
2.71 
2.61 



3- 60 
337 
383 
2.73 
2.56 



3.6S 
3.08 
3.05 
2.63 
2.63 



5-04 
3.84 
3.86 
3.10 
3.14 



3.38 
3.13 
3-44 
2. Si 
2.03 



3-73 
4.29 
2.80 
2.34 
2.71 



1.758 
1,714 

L7I5 



939 
963 



657 
529 



549 
556 



395 

400 



158 

102 
136 
144 
125 



91 

73 
104 
63 
54 



.40 
.26 



•41 

•41 
.38 

.28 



.42 
.36 
•34 
23 
.23 



.48 

■ 2<) 
.31 
• 30 

.24 



39 
■30 
.36 
.20 
.16 



10.7 

11. 4 
10. 1 
9-5 
8-3 



8.5 



10. 
11. 7 

11. 1 
8.8 
8.6 



9-6 

7-7 
8.0 
9.6 
7-4 



11. 6 
9.6 
10.5 



10.2 
6.1 
7-9 

10.6 
6.8 



45-7 
53-5 
52.1 
62. 1 
60.03 



20.0 
22. 1 
23.2 
27.8 
30.8 



35-0 
38.I 
43-5 

44.0 
43-2 



16.7 
16.5 
19.8 
21.0 
17.2 



22.5 
3i. 5 
41.0 
25.0 
17.6 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



^Diphtheria, Injection, Intubation and Immunization — 1912. 



New- 
York. 



Man- 
hattan. 



Brook- 
lyn. 



The 
Bronx. 



Queens. 



Rich- 
mond. 



Injection of Antitoxin — 

Total cases of diphtheria reported .... 
Total cases injected by Department In 

spectors 

Percentage of total cases injected 
by Department Inspectors. . . . 
fCases injected by private physicians 
Percentage of total cases injected 

by private physicians 

By Department Inspectors 

JCases injected considered as diph 

theria 

Deaths 

Case fatality, per cent 

Deaths, less cases dying within 24 hours 

after injection 

Corrected case fatality, per cent. . . 

By private physicians 

Cases injected considered as diph- 
theria 

Deaths 

Case fatality per cent 

Deaths, less cases dying within 24 

hours after injection 

Corrected case fatality, per cent. . . 

Laryngeal cases — 

Cases injected by Department In- 
spectors 

Total laryngeal cases 

Deaths 

Fatality, per cent 

Cases intubated by Department 

Inspectors 

Deaths 

Fatality per cent 

Cases not intubated 

Deaths 

Fatality per cent 



Immunization — 

Total immunizations by Department 

Inspectors 

Number contracting disease be- 
tween 2 and 30 days 

Visits — 

Total visits to diphtheria cases 

Average visits per case 



13.533 
6,077 



44-9 
1,467 



6,246 
3.750 

60.03 

552 



4.678 
1,440 



30.8 
620 



3.045 
156 

5-1 

108 
3.6 



1.579 
80 
5.1 

68 
4-3 



962 

45 

4-7 



1,107 
75 
6.8 

42 
4.0 



419 
24 
5-7 

16 
3-9 



464 
39 
8.4 



4-7 



Total injections. 



1. 03 1 
93 
9.0 

239 

56 

23-4 
792 
37 

4-7 



8,421 
30 



14.455 
2.4 



687 
45 
6.5 

no 
22 
20.0 

577 
23 
4.0 



4.401 
17 



7.967 
2. 1 



238 
32 
135 



23 

25-8 
149 
9 
6.04 



6,359 



2,108 



4.150 
2.9 



1,679 
726 



43-2 
182 



384 
18 

4-7 



124 
2 
1.6 



66 
9 
13.6 

24 
6 
25.0 

42 
3 
7-1 



1,421 
4 



1,766 
2.4 



680 
117 



17.2 
67 



9-8 



6 
7-1 



58 
6 
10.3 

4 
7-1 



32 
7 
21 .9 

14 

5 
35-7 

18 
2 

11. I 



466 
4.0 



250 

44 



17-6 
46 



18.4 



6.S 



42 
4 
9-5 



2.6 



167 



106 
2.4 



44 



* Quarantine is maintained and disinfections are ordered by the Division of Contagious Diseases, 
t With antitoxin furnished free by the Department of Health. 
X Excluding cases not showing diphtheria bacilli and those entering Department Hospitals. 



78 



COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. 



Diagnosis Laboratory — Specimens Examined and Results of Examination — IQI2. 



New 
York. 



Man- 
hattan. 



Brook- 
lyn. 



The 
Bronx. 



Queens 



Rich- 
mond. 



Diphtheria — 

Bacteriological examination for diag- 
nosis 

Showing diphtheria bacilli 

Not showing diphtheria bacilli 

Later cultures 

Other cultures 

Total cultures 

Tuberculosis Sputum — 

Specimens examined 

Showing tubercle bacilli 

Showing no tubercle bacilli 

Typhoid— 

Widal reaction: 

Specimens of blood examined 

Showing reaction 

Showing no reaction 

Indecisive 

Diazo reaction: 

Specimens examined 

Showing diazo reaction 

Showing no diazo reaction 

Showing doubtful reaction 

Malaria — 

Specimens examined 

Showing malaria Plasmodia 

Showing no malaria Plasmodia 

Cerebro-spinal Meningitis — 

Specimens examined 

Showing meningococci 

Showing no meningococci 

Glanders — 

Specimens examined 

Showing marked reaction 

Showing slight reaction 

Showing no reaction 

Pus (Gonococcus) — 

Specimens examined 

Showing gonococci 

Showing no gonococci 

Indecisive 

Miscellaneous — 

Average number of culture stations .... 

Visits to collect specimens 

Cultures tubes prepared 

Number of swabs prepared 

Number of laboratory preparations 

made 

Number of Widal outfits prepared 

Number of diazo outfits prepared 

Number of malaria outfits prepared .... 
Number of C. S. M. outfits prepared. . . 
Number of glanders outfits prepared . . . 

Number of sputum jars prepared 

Number of gonococcus outfits prepared. 



38.393 

9,631 

28.762 

29,629 

2,844 



70,866 



40,227 

9,226 

31,001 



11.897 
1,891 
9,559 

447 

3.442 

491 

2,938 

13 



2,728 
250 

2,478 



SO 

5 

45 



440 

40 

US 

285 



1,851 

743 

1,04s 

63 



S3 1 
69,749 
173,710 
175,625 

131.501 
15,650 
5,138 
6,420 
1,337 
1,440 
66,094 
5,327 



21,500 

4,989 

16,511 

12,582 

1.394 



9,429 

2,691 

6,738 

13,372 

95S 



5.382 
I.37I 
4,011 
2,200 
36 



35,476 



23,756 



7.618 



23,475 

5.350 

18,125 



5,i7i 

672 

4,322 

177 

1,360 

175 

1,180 

5 



1,272 

134 

1,138 



11,384 
2,554 
8,830 



4.065 
830 

3,077 
IS» 

1,236 

204 

1,028 

4 



809 
64 

745 



3.737 

905 

2,832 



1,446 

154 

1,252 

40 

536 

55 

478 

3 



433 

34 

399 



341 
29 
87 

225 



1,851 

743 

1,045 

63 



261 

26,713 
173.710 
175,625 

I3I.50I 
IS.650 
5,138 
6,420 
1.337 
1,440 
66,094 
S.327 



48 
3 



142 
26,022 



69 
6,751 



1.369 
419 
950 

1,048 
3 



2,420 



,156 
304 
852 



926 

191 

677 

58 

288 

54 

233 



49 
7.515 



713 
161 
552 
427 
456 



1,596 



475 
113 
362 



289 

44 

231 

14 

22 
3 
19 



24 
7 

17 



40 

7 



2,748 



79 



DIVISION OF CHILD HYGIENE 

Staff. 





New York 
City. 


Man- 
hattan. 


The 
Bronx. 


Brook- 
lyn. 


Queens. 


Rich- 
mond. 




i 
r 
4 

20 

I 

18 
129 

82 
4 

10 
5 

2 

18 

8 

24S 

172 

10 

56 

7 

55 

23 

35 


























1 
9 


1 
2 


1 

7 


1 
2 














8 
55 
35 
2 
3 
2 

I 

9 

3 

104 

70 

4 

28 

2 

27 

10 

18 


2 
13 
8 


6 
51 
30 

2 

4 
2 

1 
8 
4 

93 

62 
3 

24 
4 

24 
9 

II 


2 
8 

7 


















2 

1 


1 








Inspection of institutions and day 








1 
1 
23 
19 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
3 












School medical inspection 


18 

15 

2 

1 


7 
6 


Milk stations 


1 




1 

1 
2 

















Supervision of Midwives. 

During the year 1912, 1,524 women applied for permits to practice midwifery. Of 
this number 1,325 permits were granted, three were denied and the remainder were under 
consideration at the end of the year. As these permits are in force for one year from their 
date of issue, the number of permits granted represents the number of women licensed to 
practice midwifery. Out of 135,655 births reported to the department during the year, 
82,390 were reported by physicians and 53,265 by midwives. 

Previous to 1912 there was no specific appropriation for the supervision of midwives 
and it was necessary for the Division of Child Hygiene to employ its medical school in- 
spectors for investigation of the women and their equipment before recommending the 
granting of the permit, as well as for subsequent inspections to ascertain whether the rules 
governing the practice of midwives had been complied with. At the beginning of 191 2 a 
special force of five medical inspectors and ten nurses was assigned to the duty of super- 
vising midwives and foundlings boarded in private homes. By this means the character 
of the supervision has been greatly improved. The inspectors and nurses of this special 
staff have been able to familiarize themselves with the women and their medical work. The 
inspectors make the preliminary investigations before the application for a permit is for- 
warded to the Board of Health. The nurses make subsequent inspections and instruct the 
midwives in regard to asepsis, the technique of nursing and the care and feeding of infants. 

Midwives who practice medicine illegally are liable to prosecution by the County Medi- 
cal Society and those who perform criminal operations come under the jurisdiction of the 
District Attorney. The Division of Child Hygiene investigates all cases coming under 
either classification whether the complaint originates with an inspector or nurse or is sent 
to the department by a citizen, and when any evidence is discovered that might be made the 
basis for further investigation or legal action the matter is referred to the proper author- 
ities. Permits to practice midwifery are revoked by the Board of Health upon the legal 

80 



CHILD HYGIENE. 

conviction of the midwife or upon evidence that the rules and regulations of the department 
have been disobeyed. In case of a simple infraction of the rules, the midwife is warned 
against a repetition of the offense and the second infraction is followed by the recommenda- 
tion that her permit be revoked. During 19 12, 71 permits were revoked for various reasons, 
including failure to use the one per cent, solution of nitrate of silver as a preventive of 
ophthalmia neonatorum, the occurrence of puerperal sepsis, improper equipment, negligence, 
and illegal practice. Midwives are supplied with a special form of postal card, upon which 
they are required to report all cases of sore eyes occurring in the new-born. This rule has 
been well observed. Each case reported is visited by an ophthalmologist for the purpose 
of making a definite diagnosis. During 1912, midwives reported 91 cases of sore eyes, of 
which 44 proved to be ophthalmia neonatorum. Physicians reported 12 such cases, nine 
of which were ophthalmia neonatorum, institutions reported 61 cases, and the nurses nine, 
the positive diagnosis of ophthalmia neonatorum being made in 60 and three cases respect- 
ively. With the present force it has been possible to refer these cases to proper agencies 
for treatment, and, by repeated visits, to determine that the proper treatment has been 
received. In no instance has the department obtained evidence that blindness has re- 
sulted, although persistent efforts have been made to follow the course of all cases reported. 
All deaths from puerperal septicaemia are investigated and when a midwife has at any period 
attended such a case it is charged against her record. During 1912, a total of 203 deaths 
from this cause were reported. One hundred and forty of these women were wholly under 
the care of physicians at the time of confinement, while 44 were confined by midwives. In 
the remaining 19 cases no information in regard to the attendant could be obtained owing 
to the fact that the deceased left no near relative or friends or on account of removal of the 
family and the impossibility of locating them. While the character and the methods of 
practice of midwives have greatly improved during the past year, it has been evident that 
many of them are unfitted for their profession and do not maintain either the ethical or 
technical standards that are essential. The habitual delinquents are, generally speaking, 
the older midwives who have practiced for many years unsupervised and unrestrained. 
The younger women and those recently entering the profession are more amenable to in- 
struction and are of a better type. The need of proper preliminary training and education 
is increasingly evident. The superior character and ability of the graduates of foreign 
schools, as well as of those graduated from the Bellevue Hospital School for Midwives in 
this city, are strikingly evident. Training of a similar nature should be made available 
and compulsory for all future applicants, and it is essential that facilities for this purpose 
should be available in the near future. 

Supervision of Midwifery. 



Year, 1912. 



New York 
City. 



Man- 
hattan. 



The 
Bronx. 



Brook- 
lyn. 



Queens. 



Rich- 
mond. 



Applications brought forward . 
New applications received 

Total 

Applications granted 

Applications denied 

Applications pending 

Total 

Permits expired 

Permits revoked 

Total number in force 

Number first inspections 

Number reinspections 

Number not found 

Number special investigations 

Total inspections 



55 
1,501 



1. 556 

1,325 

3 

228 



1.556 

1,152 
7i 

1,390 

1.580 
10,847 

3.967 
40 



16,434 



17 
762 



48 



779 

595 

63 

675 

958 

4.030 

2.979 

25 



7,992 



6 

126 



373 
3 

127 



132 

86 
8 
127 
167 
661 
279 



357 
o 
470 
309 
5,7i6 
645 



6,685 



125 
107 



95 

o 

105 

142 

411 

59 



13 

4 

29 

5 



38 



8l 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

Foundlings Boarded in Private Homes. 

A special staff of five inspectors and ten nurses available during 19 12 for the super- 
vision of midwives and of foundlings boarded in private homes has resulted in increased 
efficiency in this direction. By limiting the duration of permits to one year it has been 
possible to maintain a more effective supervision of the holder of the permit and to limit 
more definitely the issuing of permits to women who are well able to give proper care to 
babies in their homes. The primary reason for boarding out in private homes infants who 
would be committed to the care of institutions is the reduction of the high infant mortality 
in this class of cases. While institutions provide such modern methods for the care of in- 
fants as are prescribed by their medical staff, and while their equipment is in most in- 
stances modern, the appallingly high infant death rate in foundling institutions still remains 
the most serious problem in the consideration of this subject, and fully justifies an extension 
of the system of boarding foundlings in private homes. In the hospitals, for instance, and 
foundling asylums, 4,522 deaths from all causes of infants under one year occurred during 
19 1 2 as contrasted with 9,693 similar deaths occurring in dwellings. The following tables 
show the gravity of the situation in the Borough of Manhattan, where the largest institutions 
of this kind are located: 



Deaths from All Causes Under One Year of Age — 1912. 



Institutions. 



Dwellings. 



Total. 



New York City 

Borough of Manhattan 
Borough of The Bronx . 
Borough of Brooklyn . . 
Borough of Queens 
Borough of Richmond . 



4,522 

3,358 

208 

814 

68 

74 



9,693 

4,275 

900 

3,629 

713 
176 



14,215 
7,633 
1,108 

4,443 
781 
250 



Deaths from Diarrheal Diseases Under One Year of Age — 1912. 



Institutions. 



Dwellings. 



Total. 



New York City 

Borough of Manhattan 
Borough of The Bronx . 
Borough of Brooklyn . . 
Borough of Queens 
Borough of Richmond. 



1,076 

703 
26 

306 
18 
23 



2,303 
867 
206 
951 
215 
64 



3,379 
i,570 

232 
1,257 

233 
87 



That this institutional mortality can be greatly reduced by boarding infants in private 
homes has been demonstrated beyond the possibility of doubt. In order, however, that 
such a practice should be productive of the greatest good, continued and persistent super- 
vision of the women and their homes is essential, and in addition the women should receive 
instruction in infant hygiene and in the proper methods of feeding. During the past year, 
there has been increasing evidence of the desire of these women to be instructed and to give 
the best possible care to the infants under their charge. With the largely increased number 
of infants' milk stations under the control of the Department of Health, it has been possible 
to refer these foster mothers to the stations nearest their homes and thus to insure their 

82 



CHILD HYGIENE. 

supervision and control by the station doctor and nurse. The death rate among these in- 
fants could be still further reduced if the institutions would rescind their rule requiring 
that a baby shall be returned to the institution upon the first evidence of illness. The en- 
forcement of this rule means in many cases that infants breast fed by the foster mothers 
are returned to the institution and fed artificially at a time which is least favorable for 
weaning. Proper medical care, with a continuance of breast feeding, would undoubtedly 
save a majority of their lives. 

Supervision of Foundling Babies Boarded Out in Private Homes. 



Year, 1912. 



Applications brought forward . 
New applications received 

Total 

Applications granted 

Applications denied 

Applications pending 

Total 

Permits expired 

Permits revoked 

Total number in force , 

Number first inspections 

Number reinspections 

Number not found 

Number special investigations 

Total inspections 



New York 
City. 



93 
4.370 



3.862 
104 
467 



4.433 

1,296 
2,588 
2,83s 
5,041 
26,358 
4.441 
138 



35,978 



Man- 
hattan. 



16 
1,679 



1.69S 

1,519 

8 

168 



1.695 

379 
1. 157 
1,228 
1,907 
10,371 
2,843 
43 



15,164 



The 
Bronx. 



14 

775 



789 

717 

9 

63 



789 

21S 
433 
532 
875 
3.559 
483 



Brook- 
lyn. 



5i 

1.324 



1,128 

76 
171 



1.375 

429 

726 

619 

I.57S 

10,797 

1,029 

95 



13.496 



Queens. 



463 

407 

5 

5i 



463 

184 
272 
369 
627 
I.5S0 
74 



Rich- 
mond. 



91 

6 

14 



in 
89 



Reduction of Infant Mortality. 

Probably the most effective work of the Division of Child Hygiene during 19 12 is 
shown by the marked reduction in the death rate among infants under one year of age. 
During 1912, deaths from all causes under one year numbered 14,289 as contrasted with 
^OSS during 191 1, the latter year showing a decided reduction as compared with 1910. 
In the past ten years, the infant death rate has decreased from 181 per 1,000 births in 1902 
to 105 in 1912. The interesting feature of this decline is that it has been most marked in 
that class of cases which are grouped under the term "diarrhceal diseases," and that for 
the past two years the greatest decrease has been noted during the summer months. For 
the first time in its history, the Department of Health during 19 12 was able to conduct 
its campaign for the reduction of infant mortality throughout the entire year. The cam- 
paign has been largely educational and the results obtained have demonstrated the value 
of the methods employed. 

Infants' Milk Stations. 

Forty new stations were opened during the year which, added to the fifteen established 
in 191 1, make a total of fifty-five municipal stations. Twenty-seven were placed in the 
Borough of Manhattan, twenty-four in the Borough of Brooklyn, two in the Borough of 
The Bronx and one each in the Boroughs of Queens and Richmond. Extensive studies were 
made of localities and of infant birth and death rates throughout the city and the stations 
were located in those districts in which the need was greatest. The sixteen infants' milk 
stations formerly conducted by the Brooklyn Children's Aid Society and the thirty-two 
conducted by the New York Milk Committee were discontinued in the fall of 191 1, so that 
the additional stations maintained by the department provided a total of only two more 

83 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

than were formerly in operation. The number of infants' milk stations at present existing 
in the city, with the agencies controlling them, are as follows: 





Man- 
hattan. 


The 
Bronx. 


Brook- 
lyn. 


Queens. 


Rich- 
mond. 


Total. 


Department of Health 

New York Diet Kitchen Asso- 


27 

8 
8 

3 
1 

3 


2 
1 


24 


1 


1 


55 

9 

8 




















3 
1 






















3 












Total 


50 


3 24 


1 


1 


79 







Through a cooperative plan, under the organization of the Babies' Welfare Associa- 
tion, the City has been districted with reference to the milk stations. Uniform methods 
in the keeping of records and in reporting to a central office have been established, and the 
former duplication of work, overlapping of territory, and waste of effort have been elimina- 
ted. The stations of the department have been operated by a staff consisting of two super- 
vising medical inspectors, one supervising nurse, 18 medical inspectors, 56 nurses, 55 
nurses' assistants, and 18 cleaners. The methods of dispensing milk have been those 
instituted in 191 1. The New York Dairy Demonstration Company, under an agreement 
with the Board of Health, has stationed an employee at each station to sell the milk to 
mothers. The milk is sold in quart bottles, its pasteurization and quality being guaranteed 
by the Board of Health, under a system of supervision and inspection rigidly maintained. 
The method has been followed of dispensing whole milk with an individual formula for its 
modification prescribed in each case by the medical inspector, with instructions as to 
methods of modification given by the nurse at the station and at the home. This method 
has been entirely satisfactory and few mothers are found too ignorant or negligent to follow 
the instructions. At the stations, and during home visits, the mothers are instructed in 
the methods of infant hygiene and care. In order to induce the mothers of young infants 
to visit the stations, the following methods of publicity have been followed: 

1. The press of the city has published articles explaining the object and giving the 
locations of the stations, expatiating on the importance of prophylaxis in the care of in- 
fants and advising mothers to avail themselves of the advantages offered by the stations. 

2. To the mothers of all children born since January 1, 19 12, and living within a 
radius of four blocks of each station, a letter was sent signed by the Commissioner of Health 
stating the object of the stations and giving their locations. 

3. Principals of public schools have requested their pupils to inform their mothers 
of the location and object of the stations. 

4. The members of Little Mothers' Leagues have been instructed in the object of 
the stations and informed of their location. 

5. Inspectors and nurses, when visiting homes, have advised all mothers of young 
infants to avail themselves of the stations' services. 

6. Placards were hung in stores situated within a certain radius of the stations, giving 
the address of the nearest station and its object. These placards were also displayed on 
recreation piers and in school playgrounds and other places where women and children 
congregate. 

7. Pocket cards, giving location of the stations, were distributed to the police force, 
station houses, settlements, social service agencies, hospitals, and various other organiza- 
tions. 

8. Weekly bulletins of information regarding the number of infant deaths were sent 
to all the newspapers, and were not only published by them but were made the subject of 
many special articles. The publicity obtained was widespread and productive of much 
good. 



CHILD HYGIENE. 

The importance of breast feeding has been kept constantly in mind and every effort 
has been made to impress mothers with its desirability. Where bottle feeding has been 
rendered necessary on account of poor quality or insufficiency of breast milk, every effort 
has been made to minimize its disadvantages. Mothers have been instructed in regard to 
proper diet, exercise, and general hygiene, and when necessary, appeal has been made to 
charitable organizations for material relief. A study was made of 3,592 consecutive cases 
in order to ascertain the causes determining the choice of method of feeding. The results 
obtained are sufficiently interesting to be noted" and are shown in the following table: 





Number 
Investigated. 


Breast- 
Fed. 


Bottle- 
Fed. 


Breast and 
Bottle-Fed. 


All nationalities 


3,592 
1,506 

330 
i,532 

224 


49% 

53' , 
51% 
48% 
22% 


32% 
24'i 

34' , 
32', 
73% 


19% 
23% 
15'; 
20% 

5% 


Russian Jews 

American 

Italian 


Bohemian 





Further investigation of the Italian cases shows the difference in the percentage of 
breast feeding among those mothers who were employed in work other than that of their 
household and among those who were not. 



Number 
Investigated. 



Breast- 
Fed. 



Bottle- 
Fed. 



Breast and 
Bottle-Fed. 



Working 

Not Working. 



642 



44'. 

51% 



4i'< 
26% 



15% 



The case of the Bohemians deserves special attention. These mothers were nearly 
all employed, many for the entire day, in cigar factories and could not nurse their children 
at all, while others, working at home, were so poorly nourished and anaemic that nursing 
was impossible. The poor physical condition of these mothers is doubtless largely due to 
the character of the material on which they worked. 

During the year 37,935 women and their babies were registered at the stations. Thirty- 
one thousand nine hundred and thirty-nine of these women were in attendance for only 
short periods of time on account of their continual change of residence. In a certain pro- 
portion of cases attendance ceased on account of failure on the part of the women to com- 
ply with the rules, some were discharged because their infants had passed the age at which 
nursing is essential, and some ceased attending because they were fully instructed in the 
proper care of the infant and preferred to buy the milk nearer their homes. A decrease 
in attendance is characteristic of the winter months. The mothers are generally fully aware 
of the need of additional care of their babies during the summer, but in winter it is difficult 
to convince them that special attention is necessary, and there is a well-rooted aversion 
to bringing infants to the stations in cold weather. One of the most essential and, at the 
same time, most difficult features of our educational work consists in combating this theory. 
In order to determine the number of deaths occurring in babies who had been in attendance 
at the stations, home visits are made for two weeks after attendance has ceased. Illness 
resulting in death, or death occurring during this period, is charged against the station. 
All babies referred to hospitals or to other agencies for treatment are kept on the records 
and every death noted. Every effort is made by investigation of death records and by 

85 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

cooperation with institutions to ascertain all deaths that may legitimately be charged 
against the station. In this connection it is important to note that the proportion of sick 
babies brought to these stations is exceedingly high, about 60% of the infants exhibiting 
some ailment at the time of their first registration. The true value of the stations consists 
in their prophylactic efforts, but it is not yet possible to eliminate the prevalent idea that 
the stations are dispensaries, and in many instances mothers do not bring their babies to 
the stations so long as they are well. During the year 169 deaths occurred among babies 
registered at the stations, 83 from diarrhceal diseases and 86 from other causes, amounting 
in all to . 5 of 1 % of the total registration, or 1 . 8 % based on the number of babies registered 
at the end of the year, and is indicative of the great value of infants' milk stations in the 
reduction of infant mortality. 

District Visiting. 

The inspectors and nurses assigned to school duty during the school year were employed 
during the summer months in caring for babies not under the jurisdiction of the stations. 
This work is also carried on in part during the school year, when the nurses at every oppor- 
tunity afforded them by their home visits instruct mothers in the principles of infant hygiene 
and care. Also throughout the year medical inspectors respond to emergency calls in the 
case of sick babies where the families are unable to employ a private physician. Following 
the plan instituted with such marked success in 191 1, the efforts of the staff have been es- 
pecially directed to those districts showing the highest rate of infant mortality. Commenc- 
ing July 1 st a definite district was assigned to each school nurse not engaged in other duties 
and she was required to locate one hundred and fifty babies under one year of age and to 
visit each at least once in ten days. Those who were sick or delicate were visited as often 
as necessary, and mothers were instructed in detail in the value of breast feeding and the 
hygiene of infancy. Each day the nurses and inspectors conferred in regard to sick or 
delicate babies, the inspectors visiting those cases in which the parents were unable to pay 
for medical attendance. When possible, sick babies were referred to hospitals or dispen- 
saries for further treatment, the full force of the department's campaign being thus exerted 
in keeping the baby well. By cooperation with the infants' milk stations duplication of 
effort was eliminated. Systematic home visiting, for the purpose of instructing mothers 
in infant hygiene, has proved to be most effective, and the limiting of this preventive work 
to homes in those districts of the city where the need was the greatest has caused it to 
develop a practical value much greater than in former years when the force was distributed 
over the entire city, allowing but one or at most two calls on each mother. The infant 
mortality figures are much lower and the number of requests for medical attention is far 
less than under the old plan. From June 15th to September 15th, 18,605 babies were kept 
under constant supervision, 113,540 visits to mothers were made by the nurses, and 2,029 
visits to sick or delicate babies were made by the medical inspectors. Two hundred and 
seven deaths occurred among babies under care, 86 from diarrhceal diseases and 121 from 
other causes, a mortality of about 1.1%. 

Cooperation. 

Forty-two conferences for mothers, with a total attendance of 2,293, were held at the 
offices of the charity organizations and other agencies. Seven medical inspectors and three 
nurses were assigned to regular duty at the infants' milk stations of the New York Diet 
Kitchen Association during the summer months, and the assignment was continued on 
Saturdays during the remainder of the year. Inspectors examined all children taking ad- 
vantage of the daily boat outings of St. John's Guild. Two nurses were assigned to the 
recreation playground on the roof of the Educational Alliance building. Social service 
agencies of the city, including the Charity Organization Society, the Association for Im- 
proving the Condition of the Poor, the United Hebrew Charities, the Brooklyn Bureau of 

86 



CHILD HYGIENE. 

Charities, and the Children's Aid Society of Brooklyn, have supplied free milk for indigent 
mothers and babies, in addition to furnishing many other forms of material relief. Through 
the cooperation of the Herald Free Ice Fund and the president of one of the large ice com- 
panies, 317,700 pounds of ice were distributed to indigent families in order that milk in- 
tended for babies might be kept in proper condition. Outing societies, settlements, and 
many other organizations interested in infant welfare work have cooperated with the depart- 
ment in a manner most helpful. This cooperation has been placed on a most satisfactory 
and systematic basis by the formation of the Babies' Welfare Association, which is the out- 
growth of the Association of Infants' Milk Stations instituted in 191 1. The association 
is a federation of all the agencies interested in infant welfare and was inaugurated at the 
suggestion of the Department of Health in order that the work might be more comprehen- 
sibly and systematically conducted. The first year's work of this federation has proved 
conclusively that cooperation in efforts of this nature is essential and that its beneficial 
results are immediately apparent. 

Infant Mortality — District Visiting. 



New York 
I City. 



Man- 
hattan. 



The 
Bronx. 



Brook- 
lyn. 



Queens. 



Rich- 
mond. 



Number of babies under 
supervision 

Number of deaths 

Of which 

Due to diarrhoea 

Due to other causes . . . 

Sick babies treated at 
home 

Sick babies treated at 
clinics 

Number of visits to babies 
by nurse 

Number of visits to babies 
by doctor 

No. of still-births investi- 
gated 

Cases of ophthalmia neo- 
natorum reported 

By physicians 

By midwives 

By institutions 

By nurses 

Deaths from puerperal 
septicaemia investigated 

Attended at birth by phy- 
sician 



22,417 
207 

86 
121 

1,872 

9 

113,540 

2,029 

424 

116 

9 

44 

60 

3 
203 
140 



7,932 

52 

28 
24 



4i,525 
224 
224 



7 
32 
56 

3 

83 
43 



i,779 
36 

22 

14 

600 



10,468 

58i 

67 



42 
35 



9,437 
70 

19 
5i 

86 

53,920 
158 



10 

1 



74 
61 



1,379 
46 

16 
30 

969 

9 

5,776 

1,043 

46 



1 

2 

28 



1,851 

23 

3 



87 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Infant 

Deaths and Death-Ra.es per 













All 


Causes. 














New York City. 


Manhattan. 


The Bronx. 


Brooklyn. 


Queens. 


Richmond. 




Deaths. 


Rate. 


Deaths. 


Rate. 


Deaths. 1 Rate. 

1 


Deaths. 


Rate. 


Deaths. 


Rate. 


Deaths. 


Rate. 


1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1909 

1910 

1912 


15,526 
14,413 
16,125 
16,522 
17,189 
17.437 
16,231 
15,976 
16,215 
15,053 
14,289 


181 
152 
162 
159 
153 
144 
128 
129 

125 

112 
105 


8,594 
8,181 
9,207 
9.401 
9.464 
9,602 
9,048 
8,914 
8,954 
8,223 
7.675 


164 
146 
156 
156 
150 
146 
135 
140 
135 
124 
116 


887 

741 

920 

917 

1,029 

1,044 

1,026 

991 

1. 05 1 

1,095 

1,121 


170 

122 

152 

138 

141 

123 

107 

104 

96 

88 

83 


5,059 
4,601 
5.015 
S.iSO 
5,453 
5,503 

5.012 

4.923 

5,059 
4,628 
4.453 


215 
169 
174 
166 
158 
142 
120 
119 
118 
101 
98 


701 
634 
698 
760 
903 
936 
800 
851 
869 
830 
784 


219 
167 
180 
175 
179 
161 
125 

135 

122 
110 

98 


285 
256 
285 
294 
340 
352 
345 
207 
282 
277 
256 


200 
167 
179 
174 
182 
176 
168 
149 
142 
121 
113 



Infant 

Deaths of Children under One 



Diarrhceal. 


Respiratory. 


Congenital Debility. 




O 









































C3 


a 


a 




13 


.M 


d 

c3 




d 




•d 




a 




c 




*a 






C 


m 






c 
<u 
<u 

3 


O 

i 







m 

a 

J3 


3 





a 

4) 

3 




s 




u 


n! 


u 
CQ 
<u 


3 




C 
O 

u 

3 




i 





■z 


S 


H 


m 


o» 


s 


Z 


§ 


H 


m 


Ot 


Pi 


£ 


S 


H 


m 


a 


^ 


1902 


4,090 


2,121 


221 


1,409 


21s 


124 


3,749 


2,168 


189 


1,224 


128 


40 


4,531 


2.479 


242 


1,494 


236 


80 


1903 


3,769 


2,071 


179 


1,238 


176 


105 


3.202 


1,890 


133 


1,028 


120 


31 


4,740 


2,672 


247 


1,530 


201 


90 


1904 


4,726 


2,506 


246 


1,622 


243 


109 


3,466 


2,059 


165 


1,076 


128 


38 


5,019 


2,941 


287 


1,447 


230 


114 


1905 


4,945 


2,6ll 


26l 


1,656 


290 


127 


3.254 


1,935 


147 


997 


145 


30 


5.316 


3,086 


311 


1,619 


201 


99 


1906 


4,943 


2,481 


280 


1,693 


344 


145 


3,742 


2,114 


197 


1,218 


I8l 


32 


5.465 


3,l62 


317 


1,614 


144 


128 


1907 


5,364 


2,667 


3l6 


1,923 


323 


135 


3,627 


2,008 


170 


1,211 


189 


49 


5,586 


3,254 


370 


1,510 


337 


us 


1908 .... 


5.118 


2,630 


288 


1,774 


291 


135 


3,155 


1.755 


106 


1,051 


141 


42 


5,593 


3,283 


383 


1,503 


290 


134 


1909 


4.252 


2,119 


235 


1,522 


290 


88 


3,705 


2,060 


216 


1,197 


182 


50 


4,950 


2,8l8 


356 


1,374 


281 


121 


1910. . . . 


4,807 


2,450 


2 7 6 


1,698 


292 


91 


3.297 


1.725 


214 


1,155 


159 


44 


5,529 


3,258 


379 


1.454 


320 


us 


1911. . . . 


3,853 


1,842 


260 


1,412 


247 


92 


3,277 


1,764 


179 


1,139 


152 


43 


5,268 


2,996 


454 


1.403 


331 


84 


1912. . . . 


3,392 


1,571 


230 


1,267 


237 


87 


3,243 


1,714 


204 


1,112 


180 


33 


5.485 


3,162 


509 


1.437 


270 


107 



88 



CHILD HYGIENE. 



Mortality 

One Thousand Children Born. 









DlARRHCEAL DISEASES. 








New York City. 


Manhattan. 


The Bronx. 


Brooklyn. 


Queens. 


Richmond. 


Deaths. 


Rate. 


Deaths. 


Rate. 


Deaths. 


Rate. 


Deaths. Rate. 


Deaths. 


Rate. 


Deaths. 


Rate. 


4,090 


47.8 


2,121 


40.6 


221 


42.3 


1,409 


59. 9 


215 


67.2 


124 


66.8 


3,769 


39-8 


2,071 


370 


179 


29.6 


1,238 


45-4 


176 


46.3 


105 


68.6 


4.726 


47. S 


2,506 


42.3 


246 


40.8 


1,622 


56.2 


243 


62.8 


109 


68.3 


4.945 


47.6 


2,6ll 


43-4 


261 


39-2 


1,656 


53-5 


290 


66.6 


127 


75.1 


4.943 


44-2 


2,48l 


39-4 


280 


38.3 


1,693 


40.0 


344 


68.1 


145 


77.4 


5,364 


44-4 


2,667 


40.6 


316 


37-2 


1,923 


49.8 


323 


55-4 


135 


67.3 


5,n8 


40.4 


2,630 


39-3 


288 


30.0 


1,774 


42.3 


291 


45- 3 


135 


65-7 


4.254 


34-6 


2,199 


33-3 


235 


24-5 


1,522 


36.7 


290 


45-9 


88 


44-1 


4.807 


37-2 


2,450 


36.9 


276 


25.2 


1,698 


39.8 


292 


41.0 


91 


45-7 


3,853 


28.6 


1,842 


27.7 


260 


20.9 


1,412 


31. 1 


247 


32.6 


92 


40.3 


3,392 


25.0 


1,571 


23-7 


230 


16.9 


1,267 


27.9 


237 


29.6 


87 


38.2 



Mortality 

Year of Age — Bx Boroughs. 





Contagious 


Diseases. 




>. 


All Cther Causes. 




Total Deaths. 


>. 






















>. 
















































u 












O 












U 






* 






M 




a 






•a 


•M 




K 






*d 


^ 


c 


K 
























a 






















































is 

2 


a 

CO 


m 

V 
JQ 





n 


a 

V 

3 

o» 


S 



5 


> 


c 

a] 




3 



m 


c 

a 


i 


> 

<p 


n! 

s 


pq 
u 

H 





m 


a 

3 
Ot 


1 

B 


792 


413 


107 


242 


17 


13 


2,364 


1,413 


128 


690 


105 


28 


15,526 


8,594 


887 


5.059 


701 


285 


532 


302 


5i 


151 


21 


7 


2,170 


1,246 


131 


654 


no 


23 


14,413 


8,181 


741 


4.601 


634 


256 


537 


313 


57 


155 


7 


5 


2,377 


1,388 


165 


715 


90 


19 


16,125 


9,207 


920 


5.015 


698 


285 


586 


290 


73 


190 


23 


10 


2,421 


1.479 


125 


688 


101 


28 


16,522 


9,401 


917 


5.150 


760 


294 


750 


335 


89 


295 


21 


10 


2,289 


1.372 


146 


633 


113 


25 


17,189 


9,464 


1,029 


5.453 


903 


340 


674 


357 


59 


231 


18 


9 


2,186 


1.316 


129 


628 


69 


44 


17,437 


9,602 


1,044 


5,503 


036 


352 


704 


395 


105 


182 


17 


5 


1,661 


985 


84 


502 


61 


29 


16,231 


9,048 


1,026 


5,012 


800 


345 


725 


415 


40 


244 


21 


5 


2,344 


1,502 


144 


586 


77 


33 


15,976 


8,914 


991 


4.923 


851 


297 


583 


301 


44 


204 


28 


6 


1,999 


1,220 


138 


548 


70 


23 


16,215 


8,954 


1. 05 1 


5.059 


860 


282 


566 


326 


78 


119 


19 


24 


2,089 


1,295 


124 


555 


81 


34 


15,053 


8,223 


1,095 


4,628 


830 


277 


517 


259 


58 


164 


30 


6 


I.652 


969 


120 


473 


67 


33 


14,289 


7.675 


1,121 


4.453 


784 


256 



89 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 
Infant Mortality — Infants' Milk Stations. 





New York 
City. 


Man- 
hattan. 


The 
Bronx. 


Brook- 
lyn. 


Queens. 


=3 

Rich- 
mond. 


Number of stations 

Number of babies regis- 
tered during year 

Number of babies on reg- 
ister at end of year .... 

Number of quarts of milk 
dispensed 


55 

37,935 

9,294 

1,614,513 
169 

83 
86 

307,014 

62,502 

87,662 

757 


27 
20,623 

4,225 

897,279 
76 

15 
61 

155,500 

35,98i 

42,923 
283 


2 
2,408 

635 

52,625 
1 

1 

15,771 
6,537 

3,858 
148 


24 

14,284 

4,265 

648,137 

86 

62 
24 

131,629 

18,703 

38,502 

272 


1 

418 

• 96 

8,999 
3 

2 
1 

2,885 

1,051 

1,839 

10 


1 

202 

73 

7,473 
3 

3 

1,229 
230 

540 
44 


Number of deaths 

Of which 

Due to diarrhoea 

Due to other causes . . . 
Visits paid to stations by 

mothers and babies .... 
Number of treatments of 

sick babies at stations . . 
Number of home visits by 

nurses 


Number of home visits by 
physicians 





Little Mothers' Leagues. 

One hundred and ninety- three of these leagues were formed during the spring of 19 12, 
which was the third year of this work, the value of which has been each year increasingly 
evident. During 19 12 a regular course of one lesson each week for twelve weeks was insti- 
tuted, the same lesson being given in each league each week. The increase in the number 
of infants' milk stations made it possible to hold many of the meetings in the stations, 
obviating to a great extent the difficulty experienced in former years of securing proper 
meeting places, and also rendering available a complete equipment for teaching. Seven- 
teen thousand seven hundred and eighty-four members were enrolled, and 1,164 meetings 
were held, with an attendance of 85,355. The enthusiasm of the members has been marked, 
and the leagues have been of definite aid to the department in referring mothers to the milk 
stations and securing better care for the babies under their charge. It is to be hoped that 
the Board of Education will institute a course in infant hygiene for girls in the public schools. 
It can hardly be doubted that such action would have a definite effect in lessening infant 
mortality. 

Little Mothers' Leagues. 



New York 
City. 



Man- 
hattan. 



The 
Bronx. 



Brook- . 
lyn. 



Queens. 



Rich- 
mond. 



Number of Little Mothers' Leagues formed 

Number of members enrolled 

Number of meetings held 

Attendance at meetings 



193 

17.784 

1,164 

85,355 



77 

8,352 

354 

26,444 



38 

2,721 

214 

13.318 



41 

4,210 

382 

33.728 



, 26 

2,008 

182 

10,548 



493 

32 

I.3I7 



Supervision of Day Nurseries and Institutions for Dependent Children. 

The day nurseries of this city continue to be maintained under satisfactory conditions, 
few violations of the rules and regulations of the department being found. During the year 
36 applicationsfor permits to conduct day nurseries were granted and four were denied. 

90 



CHILD HYGIENE. 

There are now 87 permits in force. Each nursery is regularly inspected once a month, and 
two inspectors are assigned especially to this work. Institutions for dependent children 
have also been inspected once a month in accordance with the State law. While the author- 
ities of these institutions show readiness and intent to comply with the law governing their 
management, it is evident that the physical condition of the children would be benefited 
by a more complete system of control of each child. Such a system should be modeled on 
that of the medical inspection and examination of school children, with the necessary 
modifications to make it of the greatest value in conserving the health of children com- 
mitted to institutions. 

Supervision of Institutions and Day Nurseries. 



Institutions. 


New York 
City. 


Man- 
hattan. 


The 

Bronx. 


Brook- 
lyn. 


Queens. 


Rich- 
mond. 




62 
787 


17 
216 


12 
153 


26 
332 


4 
49 








Day Nurseries. 






42 


26 


1 


15 










Total 


42 

36 
4 
2 


26 

21 
3 
2 


1 


15 
IS 














1 


















Total 


42 

36 

8 

87 

57 

983 

2 


26 

10 

7 

66 

53 

69S 

2 


1 


IS 

26 

1 

19 

3 

267 






















1 

1 
16 


1 










5 




Number special investigations 












1,042 


750 


17 


270 


5 









Medical Inspection and Examination of School Children. 

The beginning of the year marked an important change in the method of conducting 
the work of school inspection. Preliminary studies had been made during the spring of 
191 1 in cooperation with a special committee of the Board of Estimate and Apportionment, 
in order to determine if a more economical method than was then in force could be devised 
without sacrificing efficiency. The practice then in vogue of having both a medical in- 
spector and a nurse visit each school daily doubled the time consumed in transit between 
the schools visited, and it was the purpose of this study to ascertain whether this waste could 
be eliminated. The success of any plan having for its object the eradication of infectious 
diseases from schools depends wholly upon the exclusion of infected children before and not 
after symptoms of contagious disease have developed. When a contagious disease has 
sufficiently developed to make diagnosis possible, it is evident that the harm has been al- 
ready done in so far as the danger of contagion is concerned, and it was believed that it 
would be far better to exclude from school all sick or ailing children, with the possibility 
that some of the exclusions might later be found to be unnecessary, than to risk allowing 
them to remain in school until the true nature of their illness manifested itself. These 
studies showed that if a nurse alone visited each school daily she might refer to the prin- 
cipal for exclusion all children found with symptoms of illness and attend to her other duties 
of health instruction and attention to minor ailments as well. This plan permitted of a 
reduction in the number of medical inspectors employed and an increase in the number 
of nurses, the inspectors devoting their entire time to the physical examination of the 
children and exercising a controlling oversight over the work of the nurses, and, while in 

91 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

many ways it has been successful, modifications will probably be necessary in the future 
in order to insure the best results. The possibility of overlooking cases of contagious dis- 
ease has been guarded against as follows: The school inspectors and nurses are divided 
into groups and each group is under the charge of a supervising inspector, who receives 
daily on separate index cards the name and address of all cases of contagious disease occur- 
ring among school children in his district with data as to the school attended and date of 
last attendance at school previous to illness. He is required to keep this information in 
such order that he may know at once when more than one case of contagious disease has 
occurred in any classroom. He then visits the classroom, examines each child, instructs the 
teacher as to the necessity of noting symptoms of illness, and makes repeated inspections 
until all danger of further infection has passed. When two or more cases of diphtheria 
occur in one classroom, trial cultures are taken from the throats of all the children and 
immunization is offered. Children excluded from school by the principal at the suggestion 
of the nurse are visited at their homes by a medical inspector for the purpose of diagnosis, 
and when contagious disease is found to exist exclusion is continued. This method has 
proved satisfactory in controlling contagious diseases in the schools. It is open to some 
criticism. In the first place, it increases the duties of the nurses to such an extent that 
the time formerly devoted to visits in order to induce parents to seek treatment for physical 
defects in the children has been greatly curtailed, and secondly, the principals and teachers 
generally are not satisfied with a plan which causes the school doctor to visit the schools at 
infrequent intervals. Both of these criticisms are worthy of consideration and should be 
met by a modification of the present system which, however, would depend upon readjust- 
ment of the budget appropriation. Each nurse now has about 4,000 children under her 
supervision, and each inspector about 9,000. A nurse cannot properly care for more than 
3,000 children and it is really questionable whether the best results can be obtained if her 
quota exceed 2,000. The present number of medical inspectors permits of the physical 
examination of approximately 280,000 children each year. Every child entering school for 
the first time is examined, all children are examined before graduation, and the remainder 
are examined grade by grade in regular order. All cases with marked physical defects, or 
those which apparently need immediate attention, are examined as soon as noted. Diffi- 
culty is often experienced in securing treatment for children. Nurses exhaust every effort 
to induce parents to take their children to physicians or to dispensaries and hundreds of 
instances are on record where parents have consented to have their children treated only 
after a year or more of persistent work on the part of the nurse. Ten, or even twenty, 
home visits paid by the nurse to a single case are recorded in a large number of instances. 

Contagious Diseases. 

During the year, 4,949 children were excluded from school on account of contagious 
diseases, and 3,929 unreported cases of contagious disease were found in the course of 
home visits made by the inspectors and nurses. With the present attention to the possibility 
of infection while the child is in attendance at school, the ratio between the number of 
cases found in the school and the unreported cases found in the homes, is of deep signifi- 
cance. When it is realized that one unreported and therefore unisolated case in a tenement 
house is a focus of infection for all the families in the house and more remotely for the 
neighborhood, it is evident that the probability of a child contracting a contagious disease 
is now greater in its home than in the school. While 106 cases of scarlet fever were excluded 
from school, 185 unreported cases were found ill at their homes. The contrast is even more 
striking in the case of measles. Seven hundred and forty-two children were excluded from 
school because of early evidence of this disease, while 1,570 unreported and uncared for 
cases were found in their homes. 

The cases of contagious eye and skin disease occurring in school children continue to 
show a gratifying decrease. This is particularly true of ringworm, scabies and impetigo 
contagiosa. There are 519 public schools under medical inspection. On an average, eight 

92 



CHILD HYGIENE. 

cases of ringworm were found in each school, five cases of scabies and twenty cases of im- 
petigo. Pediculosis is still unduly prevalent, constant reinfection taking place at home 
from other members of the family. On an average, eight inspections of each school child 
were made during the year. 



School Medical Inspection — Contagious Diseases Found in School and Excluded — 1Q12. 

CITY OF NEW YORK. 



General Contagious Diseases. 



Cases found in 
school and 
excluded. 



Unreported cases 
found in 
homes. 



Diphtheria. . 
Scarlet fever. 

Measles 

Chicken pox. 

Pertussis 

Mumps 

Poliomyelitis . 
Tuberculosis . 
Erysipelas. . . 
Gonorrhoea . . 



Total. 



* True cases. 



♦146 
*io6 

*7 4 2 

%743 

*2<}I 
= 1,892 



*26 

*I 

*2 



4,949 



1, in 
168 

1,097 

2,112 
372 

2,648 



27 
2 
2 



*20 

*i8 5 

"1,570 

*8o5 

*445 

*902 

*I 
*I 



7,539 



3,929 



87 

211 

1,784 

866 

466 

1,028 

1 

I 



4,444 



Contagious Eye and Skin 
Diseases. 



Cases found in 
school. 



Excluded from 
school. 



Pediculosis 

Trachoma 

Conjunctivitis 

Ringworm 

Scabies 

Impetigo 

Favus 

Molluscum contagiosum 
Miscellaneous 

Total 



184,907 

14,497 

33,875 

4,108 

2,593 
10,332 

349 
122 

3,43i 



3,368 

92 

805 

79 
202 

151 
15 

4 



254,214 



4,716 



School Medical Inspection — Vaccinations. 

New York City 69,842 

Manhattan 16,556 

The Bronx 3^940 

Brooklyn 30,746 

Queens 17,939 

Richmond 661 

93 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Physical Defects. 

The number of cases of physical defects discovered is shown in the subjoined tables. 
It was impossible to obtain treatment for but a very small number of those presenting 
defective teeth on account of the lack of facilities for free dental treatment. These facil- 
ities will be considerably increased during the ensuing year through the free dental clinics 
to be established by the department. A definite decrease has been noted in the occurrence 
of all physical defects and the total decrease in the past four years since systematic efforts 
have been made to induce the parents of these children to place them under treatment is 
evidence of the efficacy of this work. 



School Medical Inspection — Visits Made by Inspectors and Nurses. 



New York 
City. 



Man- 
hattan. 



The 
Bronx. 



Brook- 
lyn. 



Queens. 



Rich- 
mond. 



Visits to Dispensaries: 

By inspectors 

By nurses 

Visits to Cases of Contagious Eye and Skin 
Diseases: 

By inspectors 

By nurses 

Visits to Physically Defective Children: 

By inspectors 

By nurses 

Visits to Cases not Found: 

By inspectors 

By nurses 

Total Number of Visits: 

By inspectors 

By nurses 



7 
2,431 



16,825 
17,048 



37,108 
164,304 



11,720 
32,771 



65,660 
216,554 



7 
1,720 



7,890 
5,197 



69,348 



6,595 
14,822 



32,300 
91,087 



196 



3,386 
23,742 



805 
5,354 



5.069 
30,209 



7,409 
7,494 



14,882 
58,453 



4,214 
12,487 



26,505 
78,671 



169 



1,012 
10,176 



1,709 
10,535 



49 
3.352 



77 
6,052 



School Medical Inspection — Physical Examination of School Children — Non-Contagious 

Physical Defects Found. 



Year, 1912. 



New York 
City. 



Man- 
hattan. 



The 
Bronx. 



Brook- 
lyn. 



Queens. 



Rich- 
mond. 



Number physical examinations made ...... 

Number found needing treatment 

Number found with other defects than 

of teeth only 

Number found with defects of teeth as 
only defects 

Defects found: 

Defective vision 

Defective hearing 

Defective nasal breathing 

Hypertrophied tonsils 

Pulmonary disease 

Cardiac disease 

Nervous disease 

Malnutrition 

Orthopedic defects 

Defective teeth . . : 



287,469 
206,720 

87,361 

119,359 



21,078 

1,206 

21,931 

30,021 

335 

1,597 

915 

8,303 

721 

142,168 



127,502 
96,658 



40,517 
56,141 



11,096 
395 

10,941 

14,094 
155 
717 
594 
4,354 
271 

72,577 



33,297 
23.546 

10,169 
13,377 

2,182 

215 

2,612 

2,722 

101 

248 

160 

853 

109 

14,864 



104,277 
73.951 



30,548 
43,403 



6,521 
389 

6,117 

9,945 

67 

563 

118 

2,791 

266 

48,729 



18,339 
10,328 



5,285 
5.043 



1,093 

192 

2,102 

2,724 
II 
61 
35 
248 
47 

4.543 



4.054 
2,237 



842 
1.395 



15 
159 
536 



S7 

28 
1,455 



94 



CHILD HYGIENE. 






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95 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 
School Medical Inspection — Special Physical Examinations of School Children. 



New York 
City. 



Man- 
hattan. 



The 
Bronx. 



Brook- 
lyn. 



Queens. 



Rich- 
mond. 



For athletic contests. 

For employment certificates 
Re-examinations 



22,811 
40,501 
58,312 



9,387 
20,835 
30,228 



2,324 
2,708 
8,661 



5,136 
14,400 
16,076 



4,907 
2,526 
3,093 



1,057 

32 

254 



Clinics for School Children. 

The budget appropriation for 19 12 rendered possible the establishment of six dispen- 
saries for the free treatment of school children. In these dispensaries no child is treated 
whose parents are able to pay for the services of a physician. The clinics have been placed 
in those locations lacking dispensary facilities and services are maintained for the estimation 
of refraction in cases presenting defective vision, for the treatment of contagious eye dis- 
eases, and for medical and operative treatment of the nose and throat. They were opened 
as early in the year as proper buildings could be rented and equipped, but owing to the 
restrictions of the building and fire laws, provision for hospital service could not be insti- 
tuted until late in the year. In all cases operated upon, whether for trachoma or for the 
removal of adenoids and hypertrophied tonsils, the child is kept in the hospital during the 



Medical School Inspection — Clinics for School Children. 



New York 
City. 



Man- 
hattan. 



The 
Bronx. 



Brook- 
lyn. 



Eye Clinic — Refraction Service: 

Number registered 

Number discharged 

Normal 

Cured 

Dropped 

Number refractions performed 
Number treatments 

Contagious Eye Disease Service: 

Number registered 

Number discharged 

Normal 

Cured 

Dropped 

Number operations performed 
Number treatments 

Nose and Throat Service: 

Number registered 

Number discharged 

Normal 

Cured 

Dropped 

Number treatments 

Number operations performed 
Number referred for operation 
Home visits made by nurses . . 



4,845 

2,829 

506 

1,908 

415 

8,780 

4>907 



9,75o 
5,H9 
2,078 

i,542 

i,499 

255 

63,519 



2,455 
1,084 

341 

689 

54 

io,344 

57i 

680 

1,671 



1,970 

977 
246 

573 

158 

3,394 

1,521 



6,380 
4,085 
1,838 

872 
1,375 

255 
27,808 



452 

4 

446 

2 

2,714 

441 

33 

450 



668 
426 

3i 
321 

74 

1,568 

596 



466 
135 



no 

25 



2,490 



442 

293 

69 

187 

37 
1,274 

115 

55 
283 



2,207 

1,426 

229 

1,014 

183 
3,8i8 
2,890 



2,904 

899 

240 

560 

99 



33,221 



1,204 

339 
268 

56 

15 

6,356 

15 

592 

938 



96 



CHILD HYGIENE. 

night preceding and following the operation, and all operations are performed under general 
anaesthesia. Six clinics have been established, two in the Borough of Manhattan, three 
in the Borough of Brooklyn, and one in the Borough of The Bronx. During the year 
operations were performed at only one clinic. Each dispensary is in a separate building, 
equipped with clinical facilities and hospital accommodations for operative cases. For 
the work performed at these institutions the subjoined tables should be consulted. The 
need of these clinics has been thoroughly demonstrated, and it is not possible for them to 
care for more than a fraction of the children referred by the school inspectors. Hospital 
facilities will be provided in each clinic early in 1913 and this will furnish the more extensive 
opportunities for operations upon the tonsils and adenoids which are so greatly needed. 

Issuing of Employment Certificates. 

During the early part of 191 2, each child applying for an employment certificate was 
examined at the school attended, and the application was denied if the physical health of 
the child did not reach the required standard. On October 1st, an amendment to the 
Child Labor Law became effective and required that the results of these physical examina- 
tions should be recorded on a special form provided by the State Department of Labor. In 
order that the examinations might be carried on more systematically, a special corps of 
physicians and nurses was assigned and an examination room was provided in each borough 
office. The physical condition of a child upon leaving school and beginning to work exer- 
cises an important bearing upon his future welfare. When a physical defect is discovered, 
or ill health not immediately amenable to treatment is present, the application for an em- 
ployment certificate is denied. When it is probable that proper medical attention will re- 
sult in recovery, the case is referred to a school nurse, and the application is withheld pend- 
ing a reexamination of the child's physical condition. 

The law requires that a child must have attended school for a definite period previous 
to his fourteenth birthday or to the date of his application for an employment certificate. 
Unfamiliarity with this law causes the issuance by teachers of unacceptable records of at- 
tendance, but the number of applications which are denied for this reason is steadily de- 
creasing as the law's requirements are becoming better known. 



Issuance of Employment Certificates — Mercantile Statistics. 



New York 
City. 



Man- 
hattan. 



The 
Bronx. 



Brook- 
lyn. 



Rich- 
mond. 



Applications brought forward . . 
New applications received 

Total 

EmploymentCertificates — 

Granted 

Refused 

Pending 

Total 

Refused for — 

Insufficient tuition 

Insufficient education 

Insufficient evidence of age 

Under age 

Physical incapacity 

Duplicate certificates issued. . . . 

Certificates — 

In force, Dec. 31, 1911. . . . 

Granted during year 

Expired during year 

In force, Dec. 31, 1912 



SSI 
42,703 



4LS48 

t,i8i 

525 



213 
239 

H3 

101 

SIS 

1,359 



53.481 
4L548 
35.889 
59,140 



351 

20,651 



20,290 
378 
334 



114 
36 



196 
537 



26,710 
20,290 
18,402 
28,598 



7 
4,101 



178 
14.309 



4,108 



4,018 
77 
13 



14.487 

13.627 
688 
172 



4,108 



4,842 
4,018 
3.578 
5.282 



14,487 



57 
183 
102 

SO 
296 
584 



17.777 
13,627 
10,696 
20,708 



14 
3.158 



3.128 

38 

6 



3.616 
3.128 
2,668 
4.076 



484 



48S 
485 



48S 



536 

48S 
545 
476 



97 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

The number of applications denied on account of insufficient education is slowly de- 
creasing. It may be debatable whether certain children who have not succeeded in acquiring 
even the rudiments of an education at fourteen years of age should be required to remain in 
school, still their dismissal from school attendance is. not in accord with the law. The 
physiological activity of children of this age demands expression and most school curricula 
seem to provide no outlet for their physical unrest. Vocational training must eventually 
fill this need and its provision will undoubtedly lessen the number of applicants for em- 
ployment certificates not only among those who are unable to progress further in the sub- 
jects taught in the schools, but also among those who, having passed the grade required 
by law, leave school and go to work, not from economic necessity but because the school 
course no longer provides for their physiological need of physical expression. The number 
of applications denied on account of insufficient education during 19 12 showed a slight de- 
crease as compared with 191 1. 

The cases in which applications were denied on account of physical incapacity were, 
so far as possible, kept under extended observation and referred to physicians or dispen- 
saries for proper treatment and care. 



98 



DIVISION OF HOSPITALS. 

The highest census of the year was reached during April, when there were 1,214 cases 
in the hospitals of the Department of Health, distributed as follows: 

Willard Parker Hospital 476 

Kingston Avenue Hospital 351 

Riverside Hospital 387 

The highest census in any one hospital occurred during May, when there were 501 cases 
at the Willard Parker Hospital. During 1912, the death rate, speaking generally, has been 
reduced about one per cent, in scarlet fever and measles, and about three per cent, in 
diphtheria. During the year, two new cement tuberculosis pavilions, with a capacity of 
160 beds, were erected at Riverside Hospital on North Brother Island. These buildings 
will be ready for occupancy about March 1, 19 13. During the year, cement pavilion 
No. 4 was opened to patients, thereby adding 80 beds to the capacity of the hospital. A 
heating plant, entirely new, consisting of a boiler house, with four new boilers, with a 
capacity of 360 additional horse-power, and a pipe gallery containing the high pressure 
steam, hot water and return lines to every building on the island, have recently been 
constructed. In February, the two Croton water mains coming from the mainland were 
frozen for seven weeks, and during this period the only water obtained was conveyed to 
the island by the department's boats. This experience showed the necessity of immedi- 
ately replacing the old and worn-out water mains with new. The Department of Water 
Supply, Gas and Electricity furnished the pipe and pipe fitters, and the Commissioner of 
Corrections supplied laborers from among the convicts from the Riker's Island penitentiary. 
A complete water system, with eight-inch mains, was installed, and it should be noted that 
the installation, which, under contract, would have cost many thousands of dollars, was 
accomplished with a minimum cost to the city. 

The steamboats of the department have been overhauled and repaired. A new 
measles pavilion, with a capacity of 320 beds, is in process of erection at the Willard Parker 
Hospital. At Willard Parker Hospital there is also in course of construction an under- 
ground pipe gallery which will contain the high pressure steam, hot water and return 
lines connecting the boiler house with all the buildings of the plant. In September, the 
interior of the Drug Laboratory was destroyed by fire, but this building has been repaired, 
entirely by departmental labor, and is now in as good condition as it was before the fire. 

At the Kingston Avenue Hospital, a new isolation building, with a capacity of 80 
beds, is now in course of construction, and a new sewer plant, by means of which the 
sewage, which up to this time has been collected in a settling tank and pumped therefrom 
to the Clarkson street sewer, will be conveyed to a septic tank on the department's prop- 
erty at the northeast corner of Albany avenue and Hawthorne street whence the effluent 
will be pumped to the sewer on Clarkson street. 

Ambulance Station Work. 



Willard Parker 
Hospital. 



Kingston Avenue 
Hospital. 



Riverside 
Hospital. 



Number of ambulance calls 

Number of miles traversed by ambulances. . 

Number of coupe calls 

Number of miles traversed by coupes 

Number of trips for cats and dogs 

Number of miles traversed 



3.027 

12,482 

691 

1,849 
US 
5ii 



1,971 

13.901 

506 

1,290 

284 

20,6 1 2 



1,686 
8,614 

192 

903 

282 
1. 9 16 '4 



99 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 
Steamboat Work. 



Steamer 
'Riverside. 



Steamer 
'Franklin Edson. 



Launch 
' Duchess. 



Number of days boat was in commission 

Number of trips made - - . .. 

Number of passengers carried 

Average number of miles traveled 

Tons of coal burned 

Average number of trips 

Average number of miles 

Average number of pieces of freight .... 
Gallons of gasolene consumed 



140 
237 

478 

2,849 

479 

237 

2,849 

12,301 



183 

2,600 

70,324 

5. 226 

849 

2,600 

5,226 

16,944 



157 
1,547 
1,622 
1,160 

1,547 
1,160 



Yearly Report, Cost of Stores. 



Willard Parker 

Hospital, 

Supplies, etc. 



Kingston Avenue 

Hospital, 

Supplies, etc. 



Riverside 
Hospital, 

Supplies, etc. 



Superintendence 

Storehouse 

Wards 

Pharmacy 

Morgue 

Doctors' and nurses' kitchen 

Help's kitchen 

Patients' kitchen 

Housekeeping 

Laundry 

Department stable, East 134th Street 

Stable 

General house and property 

Steamboats and launches 

Laboratory 

Miscellaneous 



S141.77 

142.07 

6,402.02 

6.93 

189.26 

19,317.43 

17,661.10 

16,790.34 

4,038.54 



2,697.82 
22,134.28 



1,081.24 



$62.16 

93-99 

4,061.85 

60.08 

80.74 

12,906.80 

9,404.09 

11,31462 

3.813.78 

2,542.53 

3,789.35 
28,274.62 

56.07 
2,027.99 



$32.62 

201.25 

9,852.57 

65.19 

418.16 

13,883.76 

19,565.19 

45,843.06 

4,024.37 

3,382.11 

2,372.14 

893-75 

27,382.68 

1,928. 19 

237-30 



HOSPITALS. 



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103 



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104 



HOSPITALS. 

Otisville Sanatorium. 

The year 19 12 was marked by considerable activity in the building of new pavilions 
and by the alteration of existing buildings in order to accommodate additional patients. 
The new pavilions were commenced at the female unit and will soon be ready for occupancy. 
The excavations for another building are well under way and will probably be ready to 
receive patients early in the summer of 19 13. The upper floor will be used for a maternity 
ward, the lower floor for children. These buildings, when completed, will increase the 
census of this unit by 120 beds. The porches of four male pavilions and one female pavilion 
were equipped with partitions five and a half feet high, dividing them into cubicles of suffi- 
cient size to hold two beds each. The large tent of the female unit which accommodates 
16 children was converted into a permanent structure during the summer. An incinerator 
is in process of installation at the male unit and will serve the purposes of the tent colony. 

An active effort is being made to increase the output of the chicken farm. Facilities 
are at hand at present to care for one thousand hens. Three houses, each of which will 
accommodate 700 chickens, are in process of construction, and will be ready for the spring 
hatching. They can be used to house laying hens after the brooding season is over. All 
the labor of excavating, the cement work of the sides and floors, and a part of the carpenter 
work of these buildings will be performed by patients. 

During the fall of 191 1, the former laundry, a frame structure, was burned. A modern 
fire-proof building to replace it is nearing completion. The large dining hall at the female 
unit was completed during 19 12. Plans for perfecting the water supply were matured 
during the year and a tunnel, piercing the high hill at the rear of the plant and connecting 
the forty-acre reservoir on the top with the lines to the buildings, is well under way. This 
reservoir, which is thoroughly protected from any source of contamination, is to be dredged 
in the near future. Fire hydrants are being placed at various points about the grounds and 
weekly fire drills are held. An up-to-date fire alarm system was installed during the win- 
ter of 1911-1912. 

For the purposes of treatment, the patients are divided into groups, each of which 
comprises fifty-five to seventy-five members, with a specially trained medical man in 
charge. This arrangement assures to the patients all the personal attention possible in 
any but the very smallest institutions. 

A new laboratory for research work in tuberculosis is to be established in the antitoxin 
department. With the abundance of clinical material at hand some very valuable results 
should be obtained. 

Care of Tuberculosis at Otisville Sanatorium. 

General Statement. 





bo - 
c £ 
% • 

pi 


Admitted. 


■d 

01 
U 

H 


H 


13 
bo 

c 



5 


•d 

s 






0\ 




New. 


Transferred from. 




60 - 

i*? 




Hospital. 


Num- 
ber. 


Hospital. 


Num- 
ber. 


'18 


Tuberculosis 


462 


968 


Riverside. . . 


4 


1.434 


8-8 


17 


Riverside 


37 


502 



Service Rendered. 



Patients. 



Patient 
Days. 



Average 
Days per 
Patient. 



Largest 
Number at 
One Time. 



Smallest 
Number at 
One Time. 



Average 
Patients 
per Day. 



Tuberculosis . 



179.438 



528 



446 



105 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 
Patients Treated and Condition When Discharged.* 



Number — 

Incipient 

Moderately advanced 
Far advanced 

Percentage — 

Incipient 

Moderately advanced 
Far advanced 



Totals 

Case 

Treated 

in Year. 



377 
904 

153 



100 
100 
100 



Discharged. 



Appar- 
ently 
Cured. 



61 



16.2 
1. 1 



Ar- 
rested. 



in 
240 



29.4 

26.5 

7.2 



Im- 
proved. 



71 

246 

28 



18.8 
27.2 
18.3 



Pro- 
gressive, 



3-2 

7-5 

13. 1 



Trans- 
ferred. 



Deaths. 



.3 

• 9 

5.2 



Under 
Treat- 
ment, 
Dec. 31, 
1912. 



119 

308 

75 



31.6 

34-1 
49.0 



* The classification as to stage of disease, etc., is that adopted by the National Association for the Study 
and Prevention of Tuberculosis. 



Duration of Patients' Stay. 





Dis- 
charged. 


Trans- 
ferred. 


Died. 


Total 
Number. 


Per 

Cent. 


Total patients discharged, transferred and 


878 

100 
242 
285 
251 


37 

1 
16 
9 

11 


17 

3 
2 
7 
5 


932 

104 
260 
301 
267 


100. 


Length of stay — . 


11. 1 


Over 1 month and under 3 months. . . . 
Over 3 months and under 6 months . . . 


279 
32.3 
28.6 







Places to Which Patients Discharged. 



Dis- 
charged. 



Trans- 
ferred. 



Total 
Number. 



Per 
Cent. 



Total patients discharged and transferred. 

Patients discharged to their homes. 

Patients discharged to other sanitaria .... 



878 
878 



37 
37 



915 

878 

37 



100. o 
95.9 

4.0 



Care of Tuberculosis at Riverside Hospital. 
General Statement. 





Ov 
M 

M - 

.9 a 

\i 

Pi 


Admitted. 


•d 

V 

Is 
3 

H 

H 

"3 




•a 

00 

U 

<3 

O 
to 

Q 


■d 

(D 

5 










New. 


Transferred from. 




■l«? 




Hospital. 


Num- 
ber. 


Hospital. 


Num- 
ber. 




1 


203 


650 


( Willard 
< Parker . . 
( Otisville... 


50 j 

34 ) 


937 


459 


168 


Otisville.. . . 


4 


306 



106 



HOSPITALS. 

>■ Rendered. 



Patients. 



Patient 
Days. 



Average 
Days per 

Patient. 



Largest 
Number at 
One Time. 



Smallest 
Number at 
One Time. 



Average 
Patients 
per Day. 



Tuberculosis . 



98.3 



134 



Patients Treated and Condition When Discharged* 





Total 

Cases 

Treated 

in Year. 




Discharged. 




Deaths. 


Under 
Treat- 




Trans- 
ferred. 


Ar- 
rested. 


Im- 
proved. 


Pro- 
gressive. 


ment, 

Dec. 31, 

1912: 


Number — 


















28s 
652 


4 




95 
SO 


64 
250 


168 






184 


Percentage — 










100 
100 


1.40 




33-3 

7 -7 


22 .4 
38.3 


25.7 


42.8 




28.2 











* The classification as to staje of disaass, etc., is that adopted by the National Association for the Study 
and Prevention of Tuberculosis. 



Duration of Patients' Stay. 





Dis- 
charged. 


Trans- 
ferred. 


Died. 


Number. 


Per 
Cent. 


Total patients discharged, transferred and 
died 

Length of stay- 


459 

135 

184 
77 
63 


4 


168 

29 
65 
44 
30 


631 

164 

252 

122 

93 


100 
26 


Over 1 month and under 3 months. . . . 
Over 3 months and under 6 months . . . 


3 

1 


399 

19.3 

14-7 







Places to Which Patients Discharged. 





Dis- 
charged. 


Trans- 
ferred. 


Number. 


Per 

Cent. 




459 
459 


4 


463 
459 


















4 




8 






* 



107 



DIVISION OF LABORATORIES 

The Division of Laboratories is divided into two subdivisions, the Bacteriological and 
Chemical Laboratories. In the bacteriological laboratories a considerable portion of the 
time is devoted to research work concerning problems of a practical nature applicable to 
the prevention or treatment of disease. In addition, an enormous amount of routine work 
is performed. 

Because of the small force of chemists, the Chemical Laboratory necessarily devotes 
most of its work to the routine chemical examinations made for the Department of Health 
and for the Police Department. Whenever possible, some research work is undertaken. 

Work Performed at the Bacteriological Laboratories. 

Bacteriological examinations of some forty thousand samples of milk have been made 
in order to detect the conditions under which milk is produced, transported and sold. A 
special investigation of the pasteurization of milk and of the effectiveness of the forms of 
apparatus employed has been conducted. Examinations of water have also been made 
daily in order to determine the wholesomeness of wells and of the many other supplies which 
come under the jurisdiction of the Department of Health. This has included the examina- 
tion of water supplies at farms furnishing the city with milk and of the water covering oyster 
beds. So great is the importance of the typhoid carrier on milk farms that wherever any 
suggestion of peril is found, stools of the men employed at the farms are examined as soon 
as possible for typhoid bacilli. 

The Research Laboratory has produced for free distribution, as in past years, all the 
products used by the city in the work of preventive medicine, such as diphtheria antitoxin, 
tetanus antitoxin, antimeningitis serum, antistreptococcus serum, pasteur vaccine, vaccine 
for smallpox and the bacterial vaccines. The laboratories supplied most of the serum 
employed in the epidemic of cerebrospinal meningitis in Texas and the Southwest. 

During August and September the city was threatened with bubonic plague through 
possible importation of the infected rats from Porto Rico. In order to insure that any 
infection that might have taken place should be eradicated, some 3,000 rats were caught 
on the wharves and carefully examined. Fortunately, no infection was found in them. 

The two important new fields of activity undertaken during the year have embraced 
the investigation of trachoma and infectious eye diseases, and have made available the 
application of the Wassermann reaction in all cases in New York City in which a suspicion 
of syphilis or latent gonorrhoea exists. 

Trachoma Studies. 

These studies concerning the specific cause and prevention of trachoma have given such 
evidence as to make the outlook most encouraging for a speedy solution of this problem. 
It has been demonstrated that: 

1 . Practically all cases of so-called trachoma (granular and papillary conjunctivitis) in 
the public schools of New York City have been apparently cured within a year when cases 
have been seen at or near beginning of disease. 

2. With careful treatment of all cases of acute conjunctivitis in homes, clinics and 
schools, the cases of papillary and granular conjunctivitis have become markedly fewer in 
number. 

3. Prophylactic and curative treatment of these eye conditions has been greatly 

108 



LABORATORIES. 

helped by providing special classes in schools for these cases, where they may be under 
direct and continuous control. 

The chief practical point made emphatic in these studies is that all acute cases should 
have greater care, i. e., they should have more frequent home visiting; there should be fre- 
quent examination for infection of other members of the family and continued inspection 
of the home after the cases are cured. An ophthalmia school has been started. 

Establishment of Serodiagnostic Laboratory. 

In compliance with sections 4, 5 and 6 of the resolutions regarding venereal diseases 
adopted by the New York Board of Health on February 29, 1912, a serodiagnostic labora- 
tory for making the Wassermann test for syphilis and the complement fixation test for gon- 
orrhoea was officially established at the Research Laboratory on May 1, 1912. This was 
done for a double purpose; first, to gain information of the prevalence of these diseases, 
and secondly, to help the individual case by giving information which would aid in diagnosis 
and treatment. This test is so difficult and costly that the poor are not able to avail them- 
selves of it unaided. The amount of this work has exceeded all expectations. 

A diagnostic clinic for collecting blood specimens in cases in which physicians do not 
care to collect the blood themselves was held every Monday and Thursday from 9 a. m. to 
1 p. m. 

During 191 2 the average attendance at the clinic was fifteen daily. 

Outfits for the use of physicians desiring to collect blood specimens in their offices and 
at the patients' homes, were prepared and distributed to the Department Supply Stations. 

In October, 1912, after a large number of preliminary tests had been successfully per- 
formed, the complement fixation test for glanders was added to the work of the serological 
laboratory. From May 1, 1912, to January 1, 1913, 3,988 sera were tested for syphilis 
and 384 for gonorrhoea. Diagnostic examinations of smears for gonococci were continued 
in all cases of suspected vaginitis. 

During the months of October, November and December, 1912, 552 specimens of horse 
sera were tested for glanders. 

The Division of Preventive Medicine, which was added to the laboratory two years 
ago, has responded to all calls from physicians requesting that experts be sent to administer 
the laboratory products in the homes of the sick. This feature has been of great sen-ice 
to both the physicians and their patients, especially in cases of suspected meningitis. The 
laboratory bacteriologists and diagnosticians have been able to differentiate certain forms 
of meningitis from poliomyelitis and so have been able to aid in the diagnosis and treatment 
of these conditions. It is interesting to note that the general employment of diphtheria 
antitoxin prepared in the laboratory of the Department of Health has reduced the death 
rate in diphtheria to the lowest in the history of the city. 

Experimental Work. 

A number of important experimental researches have been inaugurated, the results of 
which will be utilized during 1913. 

Extensive studies have been instituted in regard to the most efficient procedure con- 
cerning the point (intravenous, intraperitoneal, subcutaneous) of injection of cells in ani- 
mals in order to produce specific immunity and the results obtained promise a solution of 
the question. Also studies have been made upon the rate and degree of absorption of 
antitoxin of different protein concentrations when given subcutaneously. These have 
shown that the department's preparation of antitoxin could with safety be even more con- 
centrated than at present. Studies have been continued upon the chemical character of 
diphtheria antitoxin, etc. 

A series of cases of pneumonia has been treated with a serum produced in the labora- 
tory. The results have encouraged us to employ it more extensively during 1913. The 

109 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

methods of the transmission of scarlet fever, typhus fever and of hydrophobia have been 
carefully studied during the year. The knowledge that the virus of rabies will pass through 
stone filters is one of the important results of these studies. 

A final report of our investigations on the relation of bovine infection to human tuber- 
culosis was made. This has attracted a great deal of attention and aided very much in 
establishing the relation of tuberculosis in cattle to that of man. Other subjects taken under 
investigation were Vincent's Angina and Noma. The routine work is briefly summed up 
in the tables. 

Vaccine Laboratory. 

The method of obtaining seed for vaccinating calves which was devised early in 191 1, 
and was used extensively during the last eight months of that year, was employed during 
the entire year of 1912 with eminently satisfactory results. There were no failures, the 
yield of virus per calf was increased by 37% over 191 1, and 51% over 1910, and the life 
of the virus was almost uniformly long so that practically none of it was wasted. It was 
thus possible to reduce the number of calves vaccinated from 124 in 1910, and 89 in 191 1, to 
48 in 19 1 2. A further reduction in the number of calves vaccinated and a corresponding 
increase in output per calf is expected during 19 13. During the latter part of the year a 
new style of package for the capillary tubes of vaccine virus was devised, the improved 
package to be substituted for the old style early in 1913. 

Chemical Laboratory. 

The court work for the Police Department is constantly increasing ^and takes up 
much valuable time. The following table shows the number of half days of attendance 
at court required by the health department and police department respectively during 
the years 191 1 and 1912. 

Number of Half Days of Attendance at Court. 



Health. 



1911. 



1912. 



Police. 



1911. 



1912. 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . . , 

October 

November. . . , 
December 

Total 



20 

9 

18 

17 
17 
15 
16 
8 
28 

39 
20 

25 



232 



21 

24 
22 

15 
11 
18 
10 
16 
7 

19 
22 

17 



14 
17 
20 
20 
27 
15 
7 

13 
11 
16 
24 
15 



199 



27 
23 
41 
23 
29 
27 

25 
37 
42 
52 
39 
31 



396 



BUREAU OF RECORDS 

Vital Statistics of New York City for the Year 
Ending December 31, 1912 



VITAL STATISTICS 

Population. 

The population of the City of New York, according to the State Census of 1905, was 
4,014,304 and to the Federal Census of 1910 was 4,766,883, an increase of 752,579. As- 
suming that the geometric rate of increase prevailing in the quinquennium 1905-1910 has 
been maintained since 19 10, the estimated population of the City of New York on July 1, 
1912 was 5,173,064, divided among the five boroughs as follows: 

Manhattan 2,438,001 

The Bronx 531,219 

Brooklyn 1,776,878 

Queens 334,297 

Richmond 92,669 

The table on next page shows the population of the City of New York in 1900 and 
19 10 according to the Federal Censuses, arranged by age groups. 

It is to be noted that the percentage under one year is less in 19 10 than in 1900. This 
is due probably to an incomplete census return for infants under one year in 19 10. In 
this year there were 129,080 births reported. Assuming 98 per cent, of births were re- 
ported, 130,382 births occurred. There were 16,215 deaths under one year during 1910, 
leaving a probable population of 114,167 under one year as against census figures, 110,524. 
In estimating this number the question of emigration and immigration of those under one 
year was not considered as figures were not obtainable. 

The percentage of children under five years of age is stated as 10.6, the lowest reported 
in at least two generations, that of 1865 having been 13. 1, that of 1875, 12.3, the censuses 
following showing a percentage varying between 11.5 and 11.6: between the ages 5 to 19 
the percentage is given as 27.5 as against 27.9 in 1900; between 20 to 64 the percentage is 
58.4, one-tenth of one per cent, less than in 1900, and at age grouping 65 and over the 
percentage rose from 2.79 in 1900 to 2.83 in 1910. 

The following table shows the excess of males or females for different age periods in 
year 19 10 in New York City. 



Excess of 
Males. 



Excess of 
Females. 



Under 1 year. . 

1 to 4 years . 

5 to 9 years . 
10 to 14 years. 
15 to 19 years. 
20 to 24 years . 
25 to 29 years . 
30 to 34 years . 
35 to 44 years . 
45 to 54 years . 
55 to 64 years . 
65 and over . . . 



1,550 

2,828 



7,917 
17,190 
23,686 
14,930 



43 
1,235 

25,474 
29,436 



4,465 
12,957 



"3 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



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114 



VITAL STATISTICS. 

The excess of males up to five years is due probably to the natural excess of male 
births over female births. Then, as the more venturesome male loses his life more often 
than the less exposed female, an excess of females begins to appear and continues to in- 
crease up to the twenty-fifth year. It is likely, however, that a good deal of the apparent 
excess of females from 15 to 24 is due to the placing of their ages in this period by females 
who are older than 25, and in a slight degree to the lessened female mortality at this age 
group. After 25, the immigration of males causes an excess in the male population up to 
55. Then again, the more exposed life of the males and their greater mortality reduce their 
number so that after 55 the females are again in excess. On the whole, the excess (2J/2) 
of females amounts in absolute numbers to 1,919, or one-fiftieth of one per cent. 



Births. 

There were reported during 1912, in the City of New York, 135,655 births, 
giving a rate of 26.22 per 1,000 of population. The births and rates by boroughs 
are as follows: 



Births. 



Rate per 1,000. 



Manhattan 
The Bronx. 
Brooklyn . . 
Queens . . . . 
Richmond . 



66,249 
13,676 

45,454 
8,002 
2,274 



■17 

•74 
■58 
•93 

•54 



The birth rates for the City of New York for the preceding ten years are as 
follows: 

1903 25.06 

J 904 25.52 

1905 25.80 

1906 , 26 . 83 

1907 27.98 

1908 28.39 

1909 26.54 

1910 26.87 

19 11 27.00 

191 2 26.22 



It must be borne in mind that the City of New York has never had a complete regis- 
tration of all the births occurring within its limits and that it is only within the past seven 
years that the percentage of registration has reached 95 to 98. The decrease in the birth 
rate is due chiefly to the avoidance of motherhood by many of the married females, espe- 
cially those of native birth, and if it were not for the presence of the foreign mother, the 
birth rate would approximate the death rate. The following crude birth rates per 1,000, 
of the nationalities mentioned emphasize this view strongly: the rate per 1,000 of entire 
native population in the year just passed was 17, of the Italian population 88, Russian and 
Polish 53, Irish 31, Swedish 27. Compared by a more accurate standard, that is, the rate 
per 1,000 females between the ages 15 to 45, to the native mother is credited a birth rate of 
29 against 112 to the foreign mother, almost in proportion of 1 to 4: other factors in the de- 
creasing birth rate are the postponement of marriage to a later age, and the degree of 
financial prosperity among the community in general. 

US 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 
The birth rates for 19 12 of some large cities of the world are as follows: 



Foreign Cities. 



Amsterdam . 

Berlin 

Birmingham 
Edinburgh. . 

Genoa 

Liverpool. . , 
London 

Milan 

Paris 

Stockholm. . 



Rate per 
1,000. 



23.06 
20.26 
26.05 
20.86 
20.07 
29.56 
24.67 
22.88 
16.81 
20.86 



American Cities. 



Baltimore 

Boston 

Buffalo 

Detroit 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Pittsburgh 

San Francisco .... 

St. Louis 

Washington, D. C 



Rate per 
1,000. 



20.01 
25-32 
26.05 
29.20 
20.57 
21.86 
26.00 

14-93 
20.79 

19-85 



It is evident from the above table that the birth rate of the city compares more 
than favorably with that of the large cities of the world, and only one of the foreign cities 
given in the table possesses a rate higher than that of New York; it must be admitted that 
several of the American cities given in the table do not possess even approximately complete 
registration of births. 

In 1912, the number of children recorded as born of native mothers was 43,685; of 
foreign mothers 91,970; or 32.2% of the births were of native mothers and 67.8 of foreign. 
Of the 91,970 births of foreign mothers, 30,044 or 32.7% were of Italian mothers, 25,714 or 
28.0% Russian-Polish, 14,221 or 15.5% Austrian, 7,842 or 8.5% Irish, 4,160 or 4.5% Ger- 
man, and 9,989 or 10.8% of other foreign mothers. 

As usual, there were more males born than females, the males numbering 69,425, the 
females 66,230. There were reported 2,416 births of colored children, 24 births of Chinese 
children, 2,017 births of apparently illegitimate children, 1,330 pairs of twins and 9 sets 
of triplets; 82,912 births were attended by physicians and 52,743 by midwives. 



Still-Births. 

During 1912, there were reported 6,619 still-births, or a rate of 1.28 per 1,000. 
occurred during the different months of uterogestation, as follows: 



These 





2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


Not 
Stated. 


Number of still-births. 


32 

■ 48 


132 
2.0 


289 

4.4 


590 
8.9 


781 
11. 8 


927 
14.0 


756 
11. 4 


2,808 
42.4 


2S5 
3-9 


48 
0.7 







Marriages. 

The number of marriages reported during 1912 was 51,703, during 191 1, 48,765, making 
an increase for 1912 of 2,938. The marriage rate per 1,000 of population in 1912 was 9.99 
against 9.79 in 191 1, an increase of .20 of a point. 

Of males married there were 47,446 single, 3,826 widowed, and 431 divorced. Of 
females, 47,768 were single, 3,346 widowed and 589 divorced. There were married 67 
bachelors out of every 1,000 above fifteen years of age, as compared with 77 spinsters, that 
is, 11 out of every 1,000 spinsters married either widowers or divorced men, the number 
of bachelors marrying widows or divorcees not being of sufficient number to affect the 
conclusion just stated. Out of every 1,000 widowers 61 remarried, while only 18 wid- 
ows did likewise; the marriage rates of divorced men (140 out of every 1,000) and of 

116 



VITAL STATISTICS. 

divorced women (113 out of every 1,000) are rather high and are in measure dependent 
upon the misstatements made to the census enumerators by divorcees, who prefer to be 
numbered among the single or widowed; 20 white females married negroes and 5 white 
females married Chinamen. 

Of 51,703 couples married, 10,436 males and 11,672 females were native born, and 
21,344 males and 20,108 females were foreign born; 8,269 marriages were performed by Cath- 
olic clergymen, 6,915 by Protestant, 8,920 by Jewish, and 23 by the leader of the Society 
of Ethical Culture; 7,611 couples were married by aldermen and 42 by judges. 

Deaths. 

There were 73,008 deaths reported in the City during 1912, equivalent to a death rate 
of 1 4. 1 1 per 1 ,000 of the population, against a rate ofi5.i3ini9ii,a decrease of 1 .02 points. 
The rates of the various boroughs in 1912, based upon the number of deaths reported therein 
were: Manhattan 14.99, The Bronx 13.07, Brooklyn 13.50, Queens 11.90, and Richmond 
16.64. The rates based upon the correction of the deaths for borough of residence were: 
Manhattan 14.91, The Bronx 12.01, Brooklyn 13.79, Queens 12.78, and Richmond 15.33, 
this last high rate being due to two factors, first the presence of a large number of residents 
at advanced ages among whom high death rates prevail and the presence of two large 
institutions, the inmates of which come from towns and cities outside New York, and whose 
deaths cannot be distributed at present to the cities whence the decedents came. 

The number of deaths that actually occurred in the city in 1912 was 73,100, an in- 
crease of 92 over the number reported, the death rate for the former mortality being 14.13, 
an increase of .02 of a point from all causes of death : the rate from specific diseases, such as 
tuberculosis, cancer and pneumonia, etc., being affected only in the fourth integer. The 
chief reason for the adoption of the reported and not the actual mortality is the saving of 
time in the issuance of the monthly, quarterly and annual reports. The table on next 
page shows the difference between the reported and actual number of deaths from all causes 
and from certain prominent diseases in the various boroughs and city. 

As the age groupings of the population of the city have remained fairly constant since 
the organization of the Board of Health in 1866, it is fair to make comparison of the rates 
of the present with those of the past years. The rate per 1,000 of the population in the 
area covered by the present city in the decennium 1868-77 was 2 7- I 7> i* 1 the following de- 
cennia 25.27, 23.62 and 19.17 respectively; in the quinquennium, 1908 to 1912, the rate 
fell to 15.51 and if compared with the rates of the foregoing decennia in the order given, a 
reduction of 43 per cent., 39 per cent., 34 per cent., and 19 per cent, will be found. 

The table on page i9 shows the increased or decreased mortality at various age groups 
of the year 1912, compared with that of the three years 1909 to 191 1. The greatest gain 
is to be found at the age group under five years and is in harmony with the greatly decreased 
mortality at this age during the past forty years; the number of lives gained at other in- 
dividual age groupings is insignificant in comparison; at the ages 70 to 75 years among 
males and 80 to 85 years among females there was a slight loss of life. 

Complete Life Table for City. 

On pages 176—177 will be found a complete life table based upon the mortality of the 
years 1909-1911 and the population returns of the Federal Census of 1910; on page 178 will 
be found a copy of the American Experience Table of Mortality upon which are based in a 
measure the rates charged in insuring lives, the latter table representing the probabilities 
of living of individuals, chiefly males, who have been insured after medical examination, 
and usually termed selected lives. 

A comparison of the male table based upon the experience of the individuals living in 
the City of New York with that of the American Table based upon medical examination, 
shows that at all ages up to 78 years the selected lives can look forward to an increased 

117 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



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119 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

after lifetime of several years. After 78 years of age the difference is slightly in favor of 
the unselected lives. 

The table on page 160 gives the population, deaths and death rates for the Greater 
City since its formation in 1898. 

Death Rate. 

The death rate from all causes reached the lowest level on record, 14. 11 per 1,000, a 
decrease of 1.02 points compared with that of 1912 and of 3.90 points compared with the 
average rate of the preceding fourteen years, this latter fall in the rate being equivalent to a 
saving of 20,174 lives during the year 19 12. 

Mortality Under Five Years of Age. 
In 1912 the rate was 38.3 per 1,000 children living at these ages, a decrease of 3.8 
points compared with that of 191 1 and a decrease of 17.1 points compared with the average 
rate for the preceding fourteen years, in this latter comparison a reduction of 33 per cent. 
The death rate of children under five years of age is considered by demographers as a most 
trustworthy index of the sanitary conditions prevalent in a community, and this excellent 
showing is due in great measure to the steps taken by the sanitary officials to minimize the 
mortality among children, especially from the infectious diseases of childhood, to wit, 
measles, scarlet fever, diphtheria and croup and diarrhceal diseases. 

Typhoid Fever. 

The lowest mortality ever recorded in the city from this cause took place in 1912, the 
rate being 10 per 100,000 as against 11 in 191 1 and 16 for the average preceding four- 
teen years. 

Malarial Fevers. 

Twenty deaths were reported from malarial fevers in 19 12 as compared with 38 in 
191 1 and 250 in 1898. This decrease is due in great measure to the more accurate certi- 
fication of causes of death on the part of physicians, who are aided in their diagnoses by the 
free examination of blood by the department in all suspected cases of malarial and typhoid 
fever. 

Smallpox. 

Two deaths were reported from smallpox during the year against three reported in 
191 1. During the past ten years 49 deaths have occurred in the city from this cause, a 
yearly average of almost five. 

Measles. 

There were 671 deaths and a rate of 13 per 100,000 of the population reported in 19 12 
against 659 deaths and the same rate in 191 1. The average rate for the preceding fourteen 
years was 18.5, that of 1912 showing a decrease of 5.5 points. Out of 671 deaths in the 
city, 631 or 94 per cent, were at ages below five years, the greatest mortality occurring at 
one year of age. The Borough of The Bronx showed a mortality of 9, Brooklyn 11, Queens 
12, Richmond 13, and Manhattan 15, per 100,000 of the population. 

Scarlet Fever. 
There were 615 deaths and a rate of 12 per 100,000 recorded in 191 2, as against 741 
deaths and a rate of 15 in 191 1, a decrease of 126 deaths and 3 points in the rate; the average 
rate for the preceding fourteen years was 20, the rate for 19 12 showing a decrease of 8 
points per 100,000 of population, a saving of 413 lives from this cause. This is one of the 
lowest rates on record, and is the same as that occurring in 1905 and 1906. Out of 615 
deaths from this cause, 550 or almost 90 per cent, were below the age of 10 years, the great- 
est mortality occurring between the ages of five and ten years. The three larger boroughs, 
Manhattan, Brooklyn and The Bronx, had each the same mortality, 12 per 100,000; that 
of Queens and Richmond showed the much lower mortality of 7 per 100,000. 

120 



VITAL STATISTICS. 

Diphtheria and Croup. 

There were 1,125 deaths and a rate of 22 per 100,000 reported during the year, against 
1,281 deaths and a rate of 26 per 100,000 in 191 1, a decrease of 4 points: the average rate 
for the preceding fourteen years was 47, the rate for 1912 thus showing a decrease of 53 
per cent, in the mortality. At the ages under 10 years, 1,071 deaths were reported out of 
a total of 1,125 at all ages, constituting 95 per cent, of all deaths, the greatest mortality, 
as in measles, occurring at one year of age. 

Whooping Cough. 

The deaths and death rates from whooping cough were 287 and 5 per 100,000 respect- 
ively, in the year 1912, against 384 deaths and a rate of 8 in 191 1, a decrease of 97 deaths 
and 3 points; the rate from 1898 to 191 1 inclusive was 10.6 per 100,000, the rate for 1912 
showing a decrease of 53 per cent. Out of the total of 287 deaths, 132 were of male and 
155 of female children, whooping cough being one of the few causes of death in which the 
mortality is greater among females than among males. Ninety-five per cent, of all deaths 
occurred during the first five years of life; 55 per cent, occurred before arrival at the first 
year of life. 

Pulmonary Tuberculosis. 

There were 8,591 deaths and a rate of 166 per 100,000 of the population as against 
8,790 deaths and a rate of 176 during 191 1, a decrease of 199 deaths and 10 points. The 
average rate for the preceding 14 years was 211, the rate in 19 12 showing a decrease of 
45 points, or a saving of 2,328 lives. By reason of the presence of large institutions in the 
Boroughs of The Bronx and Richmond, a majority of whose inmates are afflicted with tu- 
berculosis and who are residents of other boroughs, the death rates uncorrected for the 
borough of residence are misleading. The uncorrected rate for the Borough of Manhattan 
was 169, the corrected 189 per 100,000; the Borough of The Bronx had an uncorrected 
rate of 297 and a corrected rate of 146; Brooklyn's uncorrected rate was increased from 
137 to 148; Queens' from 107 to 133, while that of Richmond was lowered from 148 to 137 
per 100,000. Out of 8,591 deaths, the males numbered 5,673, the females, 2,918; the 
number of deaths under 5 years for both sexes was 144 or less than 2 per cent, of the total; 
among the males the greatest mortality took place at 35 to 40 years of age, 909 deaths or 
16 per cent, of all males' deaths; between the ages of 20 and 50 the male deaths numbered 
4,221 or 75 per cent, of the male deaths at all ages; among the females the greatest mor- 
tality was found at the age groups 20 to 25 years and 25 to 30 years, the number of deaths 
reported at each of these age groups being exactly the same, namely, 444 deaths; between 
the ages of 20 to 50 years the female deaths numbered 2,118 or 73 per cent, of the female 
deaths at all ages. There were 297 deaths of colored males and 199 of colored females re- 
ported, the rate for the colored males based on population figures of Census of 1910, being 
705, and colored females 401 per 100,000, that of both sexes being 540 per 100,000. These 
rates contrast strongly with those of the white males and females based upon the population 
figures of the Census of 19 10, the white males giving a rate of 230 and white females a rate 
of 125 per 100,000 of each sex, that of both sexes being 178 per 100,000. 

Effects of Marriage Upon Tuberculosis Mortality. 

At ages 15 to 24 years the rate was 146 among the single males and 121 among the 
married males, the widowers at this age being so few that rates would be misleading; at 
this same age group the rate among single females was 106, married females 174 and 
widowed 353, this last rate being rather questionable. The rate of total mortality at this 
age group was 144 for males and 122 for females. At ages 25 to 44 the rates among the 
single, married and widowed males were 545, 233 and 1,148 respectively, and among single, 
married and widowed females, 172, 163 and 358. The rate of total mortality at this age 
group was 344 for males and 176 for females. At ages 45 years and over the rates among 

121 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

single, married and widowed males were 1,196, 249 and 637 respectively, and among single, 
married and widowed females, 175, 109 and 1,556 respectively. The rate of total mortality 
at this age group was 403 for the males and 133 for the females. At all ages over 15 years 
the total mortality according to civil condition was represented by a death rate of 348 
among bachelors, 233 among married men, 750 among widowers, 130 among spinsters, 151 
among married women and 344 among widows. 

The death rate of males, irrespective of marriage at ages above 15 years was 301 per 
100,000 against a rate of 149 among females. It is evident that the death rates of single 
males at each age group are greatly in excess of the married males, being almost two and a 
half times as great at the ages 25 to 44 years and five times as great at ages 45 years and 
over. On the other hand, the mortality among widowers at 25 to 44 years is slightly more 
than double that of the bachelors and five times that of the benedicts, and at ages 45 years 
and over is one-half that of the bachelors and two and a half times that of benedicts. 

Among females no such decided contrasts in the mortality rates appear as among males. 
The single female presents a lower mortality at ages 15 to 24 years than her married sister, 
at ages 25 to 44, a slightly increased mortality, and at 45 years and over a considerably 
increased mortality. Widows present a mortality treble that of the single and double that 
of the married at ages 15 to 24, double that of single and of married at ages 25 to 44, and a 
slightly decreased mortality compared with single and a considerably increased mortality 
compared with married at ages 45 years and over. 

Acute Respiratory Diseases. 
There were 10,711 deaths reported and a rate of 207 per 100,000 during 1912 from 
bronchitis and pneumonia combined, as compared with 10,932 and a rate of 220 per 100,000 
in 191 1, a decrease of 221 deaths and 13 points. The average rate from these combined 
causes for the fourteen years 1898-1911 inclusive, was 290, the rate of 1912 being 83 points 
lower, equivalent to a saving of 4,293 lives. 

DlARRHCEAL DISEASES UNDER FlVE YEARS OF AGE. 

There were 4,149 deaths and a rate of 760 per 100,000 children living at those ages in 
the year 1912, as compared with 4,696 deaths and a rate of 890 in 191 1, a decrease of 547 
deaths and 130 points in the rate. The average rate for the fourteen years 1898-1911 was 
1302 per 100,000 children, the rate for 1912 showing a decrease of 542 points. 

Cancer. 

There were 4,071 deaths and a rate of 79 per 100,000 reported during the year, as com- 
pared with 3,873 deaths and a rate of 78 during 191 1, an increase of 198 deaths and of 1 point 
in the rate. The average rate for the fourteen years 1898-1911 was 70 per 100,000, the 
rate for 1912 showing an increase of 9 points. The question is often asked, "Is this increase 
an actual one, or is it due to the more accurate and complete diagnoses of the disease as B 
result of advanced technique and greater knowledge of the cause of cancer?" 

The following table shows the deaths and death rates at ages over 35 years from 
cancer of various organs and parts of the body for the years 1901 and 19 12: 



Cancer of mouth, tongue, lips, etc 

Cancer of stomach and liver 

Cancer of intestines and peritoneum .... 

Cancer of skin 

*Cancer of uterus 

*Cancer of breast 

Cancer of other organs 

*Non-cancerous tumors of uterus and 
ovaries 

* Rate per 100,000 females. 



1901. 



Deaths. 



104 
987 
324 
56 
379 
206 

349 
158 



Death Rates 
Per 100,000. 



70 
24 
4 
54 
30 
25 



1912. 



Deaths. 



146 

1,589 

575 

66 

564 

337 
639 

115 



Death Rates 
Per 100,000. 



7 
77 
28 

3 
56 
33 
31 



VITAL STATISTICS. 

A perusal of the above table will show that of all the visible and accessible cancers, the 
only variety showing a slight increase in the rate in the past eleven years is that of cancer of 
the breast, the other accessible cancers (as cancer of the mouth, tongue and skin) show a rate 
the same as that of eleven years ago. Cancer of the uterus, which might be termed an ac- 
cessible form, shows an increase of 2 points per 100,000, but if the non-cancerous tumors of 
the female genital organs be grouped with the cancerous the result will be a decrease in the 
rate of 9 points per 100,000: undoubtedly, some of the non-cancerous tumors of the womb 
have been by reason of more accurate diagnosis transferred of recent years to the cancerous 
variety. On the other hand, cancers of the inaccessible variety such as those of the stomach, 
liver, intestines, spleen, bladder and kidney, show an increased death rate leading Us to 
conclude that the increase in all cancer is due in great measure to more careful and accurate 
diagnoses and certification on the part of the physicians. 

Influence of Marriage Upon Cancer. 

Cancer being a disease of advanced life, that is, over forty-five years of age, a few 
words as to influence of civil condition. The single males at ages over 45 years show a 
mortality of 326 per 100,000 living at those ages as compared with a rate of 280 among 
married men and 575 among widowers, so that the married man at middle and advanced 
age is less liable to death from cancer. The single females at ages over 45 years have a 
rate of 449 per 100,000 living at those ages, as against 347 among the married females 
and 571 among widows, the rate among married females indicating less liability to death 
from cancer than among spinsters and widows. 

Organic Heart and Kidney Disease. 

These two diseases by reason of the frequency with which they are given conjointly 
as causes of death, and the lack of uniformity of procedure as to assignment of one or the 
other as the chief or determining cause, should be combined in discussion of mortality 
from each. 

In 1912 there were reported 14,614 deaths and a rate of 285 per 100,000, as compared 
with 13,072 deaths and a rate of 262 in 191 1. The average rate for the fourteen years 
1898-1911 inclusive was 274 per 100,000, the rate for 1912 showing an increase of 11 points. 

In the decennium 1 878-1 887 the rate from these combined causes was 195 per 100,000, 
in the next decennium it rose to 244, in that of 1898-1907 it reached 278, and in the quin- 
quennium 1908-1912 it retrograded to 269. 

Infant Mortality. 

This is expressed as a ratio to every one thousand births reported in cities and countries 
where the registration of births is fairly complete; in this city the number of births received 
is estimated at 98 per cent, of the total occurring. The number of infants under one year 
of age dying in the year 1912 was 14,289 with a death rate of 105 per 1,000 births, against 
15,053 deaths and a rate of 112 in 1911. This is the lowest infant death rate ever recorded 
in the city. On a previous page is given the excellent showing of the city as to infant 
mortality compared with that of various large foreign and domestic cities. 

The following table shows the infant mortality in the city at subdivisions of this age 
for fifty-two weeks of 1912, from all causes and diarrhceal diseases: 



Ages. 


All Causes. 


Diarrhceal Diseases. 


Under 1 month 

1 month and under 2 months 

2 months and under 3 months 

3 months and under 6 months 


5,165 
i,430 
i,U4 
2,539 
2,132 
1,801 


281 

378 
421 
1,030 
762 
507 


6 months and under 9 months 

9 months and under 1 2 months 


Total under 1 year 


14,211 


3,379 



123 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

Out of every one thousand deaths under one year of age in 191 2 from all causes, 363 
died before the completion of the first month of life, 544 before the age of three months 
was reached, and 723 before attaining six months of life. 

The following table gives the causes of death under one year of age and the percentages 
of all deaths occurring at this age in the city for 1909: 



Causes. 



Number of Deaths. 



Per Cent, of Total. 



All causes 

Congenital 

Diarrhceal 

Acute respiratory 

Contagious 

Tuberculosis. . . . 

Convulsions 

Syphilis 

Erysipelas 

Violence 

Meningitis 

Other causes .... 



14,289 


100. 


5,477 


38.3 


3,392 


23-7 


3,226 


22.6 


506 


3-5 


291 


2.0 


221 


i-5 


217 


1-5 


154 


1 .1 


130 


0.9 


92 


0.6 


583 


4-1 



In 19 1 2 almost 2 out of every 5 children that died under one year of age were doomed 
to death by reason of congenital defects, either from malformations of the heart, brain, 
spine or other organs, from prematurity, from inherited weakness, difficulty in delivery, 
etc. ; the probability of living among these defectives was zero. 

Over 46 per cent, of the total mortality was due to diarrhceal and acute respiratory 
diseases. Eighteen male and thirteen female infants under one year of age were victims 
of homicide. 

The table on page 198 gives the mortality per 1,000 infants living in the former City of 
New York, present Boroughs of Manhattan and The Bronx, for a series of years, and shows 
considerable reductions in the death rate from the various causes specified therein with 
the exception of syphilis, which shows a material increase. 

Searches and Transcripts. 

Since 1904 the work of making searches and issuing transcripts of the records has 
increased tremendously. Previous to 1904 the only searches made without cost was in the 
event of application for employment certificates between the ages of 14 and 16 years, but 
the rule of the Superintendent of the Department of Education, compelling every child 
entering school to obtain a certificate of birth from the Department of Health had the effect 
of increasing the searches from 36,074 in 1903 to 68,824 in 1904. 

In 1912 over 110,000 free searches of the records of birth were made, 63,000 of which 
were for school and the remainder for employment purposes. In addition, the paid searches 
increased from 27,340 in 1902 to 62,784 in 1912; the number of paid transcripts issued in 
1912 was 58,541. Of these over 45,000 were copies of certificates of death, over 8,000 of 
certificates of birth, and almost 5,000 certificates of marriage. 



124 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



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126 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Searches and Transcripts, Year igi2 





Free Searches. 


Paid Searches. 


Total 


Total 




School. 


Employ- 
n ent 


Total. 


Births. 


Mar- 
riages. 


Deaths. 


Paid 

Searches. 


Searches 

Free and 

Paid. 


Manhattan — 


33,229 


26,316 


59.545 


7,122 
5,233 


4,146 
3.259 


23.318 
22,087 


34.586 

30,579 

4.422 

4.283 

4.76i 

135 

20,762 
19,502 
3,041 

2,386 

2,896 

117 

767 

803 

72 

62,784 


94.131 














The Bronx — 


5,359 


3.977 


9,336 


428 
365 


112 
55 


3,743 
4,341 


13.619 














Brooklyn — 


21,230 


14.776 


36,006 


4.715 
2,302 


2,145 
1.379 


13,902 
15,821 


56,768 














Queens — - 

Searches 


2,473 


2,362 


4,835 


362 
283 


102 
84 


1,922 
2,529 


7,221 












Richmond — 

Searches 


666 


414 


1,080 


230 
194 


40 
26 


497 
583 


1,847 












City of New York — 


62,957 


47.845 


110,802 


12,857 
8,377 


6.545 
4.803 


43.382 
45.361 


173,586 












7,787 



















Corrected Mortality from all Causes. 
1912. 



Place of Death. 


Residents of 


Total. 


Man- 
hattan. 


The 
Bronx. 


Brook- 

lyn. 


Queens. 


Rich- 
mond. 


Manhattan 




737 


714 
106 


186 

27 
277 


49 

13 

2 

1 


1,686 


The Bronx 


1,190 

153 

80 

57 


i,336 
450 
200 


Brooklyn 


18 

13 

5 


Queens 


106 

39 


Richmond 


3 


104 






Plus 


1,480 
1,686 


773 
1,336 


965 
450 


4 ( )3 
200 


65 
104 


3,776 
3.776 


Minus 




Net gain or loss 


— 206 


-563 


+515 


+293 


-39 








Deaths reported 

Death rate 


36,548 
14.99 

36,342 
14.91 


6,944 
13-07 

6,381 
12.01 


23,994 
13 SO 

24,509 
13-79 


3,978 
1 1 . 90 

4f27i 

12.78 


1,544 
16.66 

1,505 
15-33 


73»oo8 

14. 11 


Corrected deaths 


Corrected rate 









127 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Corrected Measles Mortality. 
1912. 





Residents of 




Place of Death. 


Man- 
hattan. 


The 
Bronx. 


Brook- 
lyn. 


Queens. 


Rich- 
mond. 


Total. 






3 


2 






5 
65 

7 


The Bronx . . 


64 

7 




1 
















































Plus 


7i 
5 


3 
65 


2 
7 




1 


77 






77 










+66 


-62 


-5 




+ 1 










Deaths reported 

Death rate 


306 
•13 
372 
•15 


109 
.21 

47 
.09 


203 
. 11 
198 
. 11 


4i 
.12 

4i 
. 12 


12 
.12 

13 
•13 


671 
• r 3 















Corrected Scarlet Fever Mortality. 
1912. 





Residents of 


_ 


Place of Death. 


Man- 
hattan. 


The 
Bronx. 


Brook- 
lyn. 


Queens. 


Rich- 
mond. 


Total. 


Manhattan 




24 


1 


2 


1 


28 


The Bronx 


13 


13 
6 








6 




Queens 












Richmond 




























Plus 


13 

28 


24 
13 


1 
6 


8 


1 


47 
47 


Minus 








Net gain or loss . .' 


-15 


+ 11 


-5 


+8 


+ 1 






Deaths reported 

Death rate 


3H 
•13 
299 
.12 


54 
.10 

65 
.12 


225 

•13 
220 
. 12 


16 
•05 

24 
.07 


6 

.06 

7 
.07 


615 
. 12 


Corrected deaths 




Corrected rate 









128 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Corrected Pulmonary Tuberculosis Mortality. 
1912. 





Residents of 




Place of Death. 


Man- 
hattan. 


The 
Bronx. 


Brook- 
lyn. 


Queens. 


Rich- 
mond. 


Total. 


Manhattan 




70 


159 

77 


37 
14 
39 


6 
6 


272 


The Bronx 


776 

10 

2 

17 


873 
50 

4 


Brooklyn 


1 


Queens 


1 
6 


1 


Richmond 




1 


24 








Plus 


805 
272 


71 

873 


243 
50 


9i 

4 


13 
24 


1,223 
1,223 


Minus 






Net gain or loss 


+533 


-802 


+ 193 


+87 


— 11 








Deaths reported 

Death rate 


4,068 
1 .69 

4,601 
1.89 


1,580 

2.97 

778 

1.46 


2,441 

i-37 

2,634 

1.48 


357 
1.07 

444 
1 . ^ 


H5 

1.48 

134 

T 17 


8,59i 
1.66 


Corrected deaths 




Corrected rate 











Corrected Diarrhoeal Disease Mortality Under Two Years. 
1912. 



v 




Residents of 






Place of Death. 


Man- 
hattan. 


The 
Bronx. 


Brook- 
lyn. 


Queens. 


Rich- 
mond. 


Total. 


Manhattan 




20 


18 


2 

1 
13 


1 


4i 
5 

17 


The Bronx 


4 
4 
1 

4 


Brooklyn 

Queens 










2 
2 




3 


Richmond 




1 












Plus 

Minus 


13 
4i 


20 
5 


22 
17 


17 
3 


1 

7 


73 
73 


Net gain or loss 


-28 


+ 15 


+5 


+ 14 


-6 








Deaths reported 

Death rate 


1.805 
15-49 
i,777 
15.19 


281 
11 .07 

296 
11.66 


1.485 
17.48 
1,490 

17-54 


278 

17.40 

292 

18.28 


99 
22.36 

93 
21 01 


3.948 
15-97 


Corrected deaths ' 


Corrected rate 











129 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



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130 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



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£ £ SS^S s s 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

Particulars Regarding Births, Deaths, Marriages and Still- 

CITY OF 





Total. 


White. 


Colored. 


Chinese. 


Native 
Parents. 


Foreign 
Parents. 


Parentage 

of 

Mixed 

Nativities. 


Parentage 

Unknown 

or Not 

Stated. 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


♦Marriages. . 

♦Births 

Deaths 


5L703 

I3S.6SS 

73.oo8 

1(6,619 


50,457 

68,169 

38.853 

3.667 


50,482 

65.046 

3L57I 

2,634 


1,240 
1.245 
1.287 

135 


1,220 

1,171 

1.205 

99 


6 
11 
91 


1 

13 

1 


















17.278 
7.788 
1,028 


16,514 

6,697 

76s 


43,6os 

26,797 

2,221 


41,700 

21,857 

1,535 


8,044 

3.414 

35i 


7.S63 
2,932 

287 


498 

2,232 

202 


453 

1. 291 

146 










* The Re1 


urns of Births and Ma 


rriages are incomplete. || Sex undetermined, 84. 

BOROUGH OF 


Marriages . . . 
Births 

Still-births . . 


3L78o 
66,249 
36,548 
t3.3" 


30,920 

33.024 

19.528 

1,802 


30.943 

31.504 

15.320 

1.293 


855 

878 

876 

94 


836 
823 

745 
68 


5 

9 

78 


1 
11 

1 


















6,11s 

3,389 

385 


5,921 

2,896 

307 


24.145 

13.908 

1,271 


23,120 

10,902 

863 


3.206 

1.477 

140 


2,894 

1,232 

113 


445 

1,708 

100 


403 
1,036 

78 










t Sex undetermined, 54. 

BOROUGH OF 


Marriages.. . . 


2,823 
13.676 
6,944 

t628 


2,795 

7,010 

3,814 

346 


2,795 

6,561 

2.957 

259 


28 

50 

85 

3 


28 
55 

87 
6 


























2,061 
711 
113 


1,946 

568 
72 


3.562 

2,706 

157 


3,276 

2,117 

130 


1.437 

370 

62 


1.394 
302 

42 






Deaths 

Still-births. . . 


1 




113 

17 


57 
21 










t Sex undetermined, 14. 

BOROUGH OF 


Marriages.. .. 

Births 

Deaths 

Still-births... 


14.563 
45.454 
23.994 
§2,235 


14.234 

22,920 

12,481 

1,262 


14.234 

22,017 

10,941 

906 


328 

268 

253 

33 


329 
246 

308 
22 


1 

1 
11 




















2 


6,726 
2,939 

417 


6,453 

2,561 

307 


13.827 

8,295 

689 


13,304 

7,391 

469 


2.584 

1,246 

118 


2,458 

1. 158 

ill 


52 

265 

71 


50 
139 
41 










§ Sex undetermined, 12. 

BOROUGH OF 


Marriages. . . 


2,007 
8,002 
3.978 
A374 


1,990 

4.079 

2,118 

210 


1.992 

3.862 

1,750 

154 


17 

34 

54 

4 


15 

26 

55 
3 






















1 
1 




1,889 

545 
95 


1,736 

486 

72 


1,625 

1,368 

84 


1.535 

1.093 

61 


600 

220 

25 


617 

183 

19 






Deaths 

Still-births... 


40 
10 


43 
5 










A Sex undetermined, 3. 

BOROUGH OF 


Marriages. . . 
Births 


530 
2,274 

1.544 
**7i 


5i8 

1,136 

912 

47 


5i8 

1,102 

603 

22 


12 
15 
19 

1 


12 

21 
10 


























487 

204 

18 


458 

186 

7 


446 

520 

20 


465 

354 

12 


217 

101 

6 


200 

57 
2 


1 

106 

4 










16 


Still-births... 






1 













** Sex undetermined, 1. 
132 



VITAL STATISTICS. 
births Reported During the Year Ending December 31, IQ12. 

NEW YORK. 



Single. 


Married. 


Widowed. 


Divorced. 


Not 
Stated. 






Month of Uterogestation. 






M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 




47.446 


47,768 






3.826 


3.346 


43i 


589 






i 

1 


2 
32 


3 
132 


4 
28g 


5 
590 


6 
781 


7 
927 


8 
756 


9 


10 

253 


•a 










Vi 


21,071 


14.574 


14.199 


9.78o 


4.3S7 


8,249 


52 


50 


552 


124 


2,808 


48 























MANHATTAN. 



29.239 


29.321 






2,250 


2,024 


291 


435 








23 


86 


159 


.104 


410 


432 


.575 


1,263 


230 














11,194 


7.549 


6.855 


4.579 


2,006 


3,820 


30 


28 


397 


90 


29 

























THE BRONX. 



2,592 


2,658 






217 


140 


14 


25 






1 


2 


8 




63 


72 


87 


74 


273 


13 














1.936 


1.305 


1,481 


955 


449 


772 


5 


4 


29 


8 


13 



























BROOKLYN. 








































13,299 


13,429 






1,154 


1,020 


no 


114 








6 


35 


PS 


185 


-'54 


343 


252 


1,050 


12 














6,460 


4.736 


4.700 


3.462 


1,470 


3,013 


16 


15 


99 


23 


3 

























QUEENS. 








































1,825 


1,870 






171 


127 


11 


10 










3 


9 


33 


38 


53 


49 


188 
















1,020 


744 


868 


592 


274 


464 




3 


11 


2 































RICHMOND. 



491 


490 






34 


35 


5 


S 








I 




4 


5 


7 


12 


6 


34 
















461 


240 


295 


192 


158 


180 


I 




16 


1 





























133 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

Mortality from Principal Causes, With Ages of 



Cause of Death 



Borough of Manhattan 



Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Total 



Total, all causes. 



3.564 



3.336 



3,226 2,709 



2,841 2,923 



2,515 2,890 



3,100 



36,548 



1,3- 
14. 
IS- 

16. 

17- 



Typhoid fever 

Typhus fever 

Malarial fevers 

Smallpox 

Measles 

Scarlet fever 

"Whooping cough 

Diphtheria and croup . . 

Influenza 

Asiatic cholera 

Cholera nostras. 

Other epidemic diseases. 
Tuberculosis pulmonalis 
Tuberculous meningitis. 
Other forms of tuberculosis 
Cancer, malignant tumors 
Meningitis, simple 



201 
386 

26 

28 
175 

18 



34 
378 

46 

28 
176 

20 



43 
415 

50 

29 
183 

30 



17a. (Of which) Cerebrospinal 
meningitis 



19. 
20. 



22a, 

23- 

24. 

25- 

26. 



Apoplexy and softening of 
brain 

Organic heart disease. . 

Acute bronchitis 

Chronic bronchitis 

Pneumonia (excluding 

broncho-pneumonia) . . . 

Broncho-pneumonia 

Other respiratory diseases. 

Diseases of stomach (can- 
cer excepted) 

Diarrhceal diseases (under 
5 years) 

Appendicitis and typh- 
litis 

Hernia and intestinal ob 
struction 

Cirrhosis of the liver 

Bright 's disease and acute 
nephritis 

Diseases of women (not 
cancerous) 

Puerperal septicaemia 

Other puerperal diseases . . 

Congenital debility and 
malformations 

Old age 

Violent deaths (suicide ex- 
cepted) 



81 

480 

43 

5 

307 

246 
15 

18 

67 

23 

34 
33 

251 

9 



215 
32 



Effects of heat . . 
Other accidents . 
Homicides 



69 

38r 

33 

4 

316 

243 

23 



248 

5 

7 



209 

27 



162 



52 

391 

37 

5 

342 

274 
24 

19 

84 

28 

28 
30 

264 

15 
12 
28 

246 
32 



35 
390 

72 

29 
168 

24 



21 

349 
54 
41 

197 
IS 



57 

338 

26 

5 

247 

277 

24 



35 

26 
34 

265 



24 



174 
23 



161 



146 
16 



36. Suicides 

37. Other Causes 

38. Causes not known or ill- 

defined 



Under 1 year 

1 year, under 2 years . 
Total under 5 years. . 
65 years and over. . . 
70 years and over. . . 



Males 

Females. . . . 
Colored .... 
Chinese. . . . 
Institutions. 
Tenements . 
Dwellings. . 
Hotels, etc . . 
Others 



4t 
501 



622 
137 
856 



1,506 

147 

8 

L5I7 

1,576 

151 

59 

91 



43 
496 



601 
163 
917 
548 
377 



1,856 

1.444 

158 

4 

1,491 

1.573 

138 

43 



154 
19 



38 
483 



33 
493 



723 
216 
1,108 
56s 
352 



628 
219 
1,026 
524 
331 



2,012 

1,552 

165 

6 

1,597 

t,668 

168 

70 

61 



1,885 

i,45i 

131 

7 

I.S76 

I,5l8 

120 

44 



43 

289 

32 

5 

277 

276 

17 



26 

33 
32 

212 

16 

8 

17 

260 
23 

183 



14 



19 



24 



23 
3i6 

38 

3i 
164 

26 



14 

304 

38 



174 
9 



29 

300 

14 

3 

167 

184 
18 



102 
29 

26 
26 

2l6 



C85 

20 

194 



38 

299 

16 



110 
152 

21 

15 
307 

38 
30 

33 



245 
12 

218 



31 



192 



9 

320 

30 

22 

183 

23 



12 
260 

37 

34 

151 

II 



179 164 
15 1 23 



35 

266 
14 



100 

130 

19 

9 

449 

32 

19 
46 

184 



267 
16 



198 



43 
446 



709 
209 
1,091 
468 
308 



I.79I 

1.435 

151 



1,491 

127 

37 

103 



37 
382 358 



510 
162 
815 
353 

224 



1.529 

1,180 

118 

8 

1.330 

1. 174 

85 

27 

93 



716 
171 
1,021 
364 
242 



I,6l8 
1,223 



1,408 

1,219 

84 

28 

104 



186 



33 
386 



850 
144 
1,100 
337 
214 



40 

257 

19 



100 

116 

16 

9 

311 

28 

20 
21 

178 



240 

17 



167 



16 



306 
314 
164 
529 
103 



9 

310 

28 

29 

175 

10 



9 

313 

27 

29 

193 

12 



15 
327 

23 

26 
210 

15 



244 
4,068 

469 

338 
2,154 

224 



306 
24 



150 

17 



191 

166 

18 



17 
257 



143 
16 



36 

346 
26 

4 

180 
170 

17 

19 

85 

26 

21 
32 

250 



197 

20 



42 

405 

24 

3 

308 
219 

19 

13 

53 

23 

18 
51 

280 

9 
2 

14 

182 

20 



l8l I78 



166 
IS 



33 
327 



673 

118 



329 
213 



1,666 

1.257 

138 

8 

1.433 

1,292 

70 

35 

93 



1,379 

1,136 

118 

3 

1,211 

1,125 

83 

25 

71 



34 

442 



658 
108 
877 
459 
311 



1,582 

1,308 

130 

II 

1,410 

1,243 

no 

39 



38 

394 



501 
99 
696 
460 
303 



1.538 
1,212 

114 

7 

1,281 

1,238 

no 
4-' 
70 



169 
9 



55 

455 



484 
139 
731 

579 



540 

4.058 

308 

37 

2,645 

2,453 

231 

18S 

1,890 

329 

316 

415 

2,801 

139 
80 

226 

2,677 
262 

2,185 



33 

l,962| 

190 



449 
5,163 



47 



7.675 

1.885 

11,122 

5,594 



384 3.678 



1.729 

I. .-ST I 

108 

4 

1,389 

1,444 

147 

50 

70 



20,473 

16,075 

1,628 

76 

17,091 

i6,559 

1,402 

499 

997 



134 



VITAL STATISTICS. 
Decedents for Year Ending December ji, IQI2 



Bo 


OF The 


iRON'X 












Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Total. 


627 


651 


'■54 


691 


614 


508 


562 


542 


501 


493 


466 


63 s 


6,944 


2 




1 


i 


4 




3 


5 


5 


I 


2 


2 


26 


6 
3 

9 
6 


7 
5 
2 

17 
5 


7 
8 
1 
17 
5 


21 
13 

13 

7 


34 
7 
2 

13 
3 


14 
8 

11 

1 


7 

7 

1 

10 


4 
1 
1 
9 


4 


1 


1 


1 
3 
10 

3 


109 

54 


2 
2 
I 




5 
3 


9 

4 


125 

38 
































3 

135 

3 

3 

30 


4 
153 
6 
3 
28 
4 


7 
170 
5 
4 
25 
4 


4 
162 
9 
4 
33 
2 


6 
130 
8 
4 
22 
3 


132 

6 

4 

25 

6 


3 
106 

4 

5 

32 

6 


2 

120 

3 

4 
30 

4 


1 
III 
6 
4 
27 
5 








30 

1,580 

64 

49 

343 

38 


113 

7 

5 

31 

1 


108 
4 

4 

19 

2 


140 
3 

5 

41 

1 


1 


3 


2 


3 


4 


5 


2 


1 


















16 

SS 
2 ' 

1 

59 

39 

3 


12 

87 

4 

1 

78 
35 

4 


8 

81 

5 

65 

36 

6 


8 

85 
5 

I 

48 

34 

2 


8 

63 




12 

63 

2 


14 
63 

I 
1 

19 
17 
6 


10 
5S 

1 

II 
12 
5 


9 

47 

I 


4 
87 


6 

57 
2 
I 

30 

27 

2 


14 

90 

4 

52 

35 

6 


121 

869 

26 

6 


45 

4i 

5 


29 
18 
6 


II 
9 
2 


24 
17 
3 


469 

320 

50 


2 


3 


3 


3 


3 


1 


2 


2 


6 


4 


I 


5 


35 


14 


10 


16 


10 


16 


8 


56 


67 


60 


24 


10 


6 


297 


4 


2 


5 


5 




3 


8 


8 


1 




2 


7 


45 


4 
13 


I 

5 


4 
6 


5 
6 


6 
4 


5 

5 


4 
3 


7 
3 


5 
6 


5 
6 


4 

6 


5 
6 


55 
69 


45 


41 


34 


55 


36 


36 


38 


34 


35 


22 


28 


39 


443 


5 
2 

7 


I 
2 

3 


2 
2 

5 


r 
4 
6 


1 
4 


2 

3 
2 






I 

1 
4 


3 
3 


1 
2 
4 


1 
1 
7 


14 
24 
49 


2 

1 


1 
3 


30 
4 


34 
5 


30 
3 


37 
7 


27 
8 


30 

1 


39 
I 


45 

5 


39 
4 


27 
4 


37 
8 


38 
2 


413 
52 


21 


18 


22 


27 


32 


20 


39 


24 


26 


36 


32 


26 


323 












7 
28 

4 


1 
23 










8 


21 


17 
1 


20 
2 


26 

1 


32 


17 
3 


25 

1 


34 
2 


28 
4 


26 


297 
18 


3 

65 


64 


7 
60 


11 
61 

I 


9 

70 


10 

45 

2 


8 
56 


6 
57 


3 

62 


5 

52 


4 
49 


9 
69 


82 

710 

3 


















86 

25 
126 
120 

76 


100 

29 

151 

113 

84 


95 

148 
104 
69 


94 
30 
154 
125 
92 


95 
43 
176 
87 
61 


67 
29 
123 
68 
4i 


119 
33 

176 
75 
46 


127 
26 

172 
75 

48 


117 
18 

145 
82 
56 


69 
12 
99 
88 
60 


79 
14 
109 
81 
54 


73 

25 

118 

115 

74 


1,121 

309 

1.697 

1. 133 

761 


362 

265 

19 


359 

292 

17 


358 

296 

16 

I 
283 
260 
102 

2 


397 

294 

23 


334 

280 

15 


269 

239 

10 


332 

230 

10 


318 
224 

7 


287 

214 
8 


293 

220 

10 


258 
208 

11 


353 
22 


3,900 

3.044 

168 


240 
262 
119 

1 
5 


273 

258 

in 

3 

6 


329 
235 
109 

I 
17 


267 

240 

92 

1 

14 


229 

176 

90 

13 


247 

204 

9 i 
16 


208 
240 

1 

15 


185 
191 
no 


206 

187 

82 


169 

190 

88 


236 
269 
119 


2.S72 
1. 194 


15 


18 


19 


II 


156 



135 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

Mortality from the Principal Causes, With Ages of 



Cause of Death 



Borough of Brooklyn 



Jan. 



Feb. 



Mar. 



Apr. 



May- 



June 



July 



Aug. 



Sept. 



Oct. 



Nov, 



Dec. 



Total 



Total, all causes. 



2,147 



2,169 



2,316 



2,076 



2,016 



1,783 



1,838 



1,840 



2,084 



23.994 



3- 
4- 

5- 
6. 
7- 
8. 
9- 
10. 

II. 

12. 
13- 
14. 
IS- 

16. 
17. 



18. 



21. 
22. 

22a 
23- 
24. 

25- 

26. 



28. 

29. 
30. 

31. 

32. 
33- 

34- 
35- 



Typhoid fever 

Typhus fever 

Malarial fevers 

Smallpox 

Measles 

Scarlet fever 

Whooping cough 

Diphtheria and croup. . . . 

Influenza 

Asiatic cholera 

Cholera nostras 

Other epidemic diseases. . . 
Tuberculosis pulmonalis . . 
Tuberculous meningitis. . . 
Other forms of tuberculosis 
Cancer, malignant tumors. 
Meningitis, simple 



24 



14 



18 



IS 



14 



13 

211 

19 

13 

90 

8 



258 



103 
5 



9 
260 



103 

7 



23 

235 

21 

14 

109 

6 



16 
221 

29 

19 
101 

IS 



7 

168 

17 

II 

95 

7 



207 
19 



7 

174 

14 

13 

97 

4 



4 
151 
18 
17 
128 
6 



4 

174 

16 

16 

104 

3 



6 

170 

11 

23 

114 

5 



9 

212 

10 

14 

107 

7 



(Of which) cerebrospinal 
meningitis 



Apoplexy and softening of 

brain 

Organic heart disease. . . 

Acute bronchitis 

Chronic bronchitis 

Pneumonia (excluding 

broncho-pneumonia).. . . 

Broncho-pneumonia 

Other respiratory diseases 
Diseases of stomach (can- 
cer excepted) 

Diarrhoeal diseases (under 

S years) , 

Appendicitis and typh 

litis .-••••.• 

Hernia and intestinal ob 

struction 

Cirrhosis of the liver 

Bright's disease and acute 

nephritis 

Diseases of women (not 

cancerous) 

Puerperal septicaemia. . . 
Other puerperal diseases 
Congenital debility and 

malformations 

Old age 

Violent deaths (suicide ex 

cepted) 



41 

360 

SS 

7 

218 

159 
16 

15 

47 

13 

18 
33 

131 

7 
7 



32 

326 

32 

14 

236 

148 



13 



41 

323 

39 

7 

220 

193 

19 

16 
69 



167 



83 



23 
269 



189 

200 

16 

14 

60 

18 

19 
28 



29 

267 

34 



162 

184 
15 

16 

74 

24 

16 
37 

167 



18 

243 

16 



116 

14 



24 



145 

6 

4 
17 

95 
15 

78 



70 

82 

9 

IS 

318 

24 

17 
32 

169 



112 

7 



16 

194 
9 
3 

74 

71 

5 



304 

14 

15 
28 

1 54 

3 
10 

18 

94 
11 

94 



238 
II 
6 



254 



25 

254 



104 
102 



167 
16 



164 

6 

2 

13 

106 



255 
35 



150 
104 



35 

176 



94 



a. Effects of heat . . 

b. Other accidents . 

c. Homicides 



31 
no 



104 
5 



36. Suicides 

37. Other causes 

38. Causes not known or ill- 

defined 



17 
307 



13 

327 



24 
356 



17 
329 



17 
297 



18 

256 



24 
269 



14 
267 



15 
261 



Under 1 year 

I year, under 2 years . 
Total under 5 years. . 
65 years and over. . . . 
70 years and over 



Males 

Females. . . . 
Colored .... 
Chinese .... 
Institutions. 
Tenements . 
Dwellings. . 
Hotels, etc. . 
Others 



346 
82 
5io 
478 
328 



280 
95 
476 
496 
349 



374 
116 
606 
474 
312 



398 
166 
669 
437 
315 



352 
150 
611 
377 
252 



318 
90 
484 
300 
205 



S24 
102 
716 
322 
224 



446 
US 
620 
311 
228 



417 
71 
548 
300 
198 



383 
74 
517 
365 
250 



326 
68 
466 
390 
268 



1,182 

96s 

50 

2 

538 

941 

608 

19 

41 



1,168 

1,001 

51 



594 

918 

609 

16 

32 



1.250 

1,066 

62 



999 

629 

13 

27 



1,229 

1,065 

47 

1 

619 

1,021 

607 



1,144 

932 

46 



589 
880 
550 



812 

37 

1 

515 

707 

437 

6 

39 



1,054 
962 



620 

872 

466 

4 

54 



965 
818 
39 
1 
562 
771 
408 



867 

860 

38 



482 

766 

435 

4 

40 



965 

873 

45 

1 

557 

766 

467 

14 

34 



941 

899 

54 



539 

746 

5IS 

7 

33 



283 
31 
15 

225 
155 

24 

13 
51 



27 
183 



87 



23 
305 



389 
78 
459 
474 
319 



1,087 

997 

44 

I 

607 

896 

544 

6 

31 



10 

2 
203 
225 
86 
400 
115 



126 

2,441 

215 

174 

1,252 

83 



35 



307 

3.219 

343 

101 

1,811 

1.581 

171 

172 

1,558 

208 

170 
361 



84 
54 



1,162 
167 



35 

1,007 

79 



214 
3,458 



4,453 
1,207 
6,682 
4,724 
3.248 



12.744 

11,250 

561 

11 

6,870 

10,283 

6,275 

no 

456 



136 



VITAL STATISTICS. 
Decedents for Year Ending December ji, IQI2 





Borough of Queens 




Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Total 




357 


316 


356 


348 


329 


309 


362 


370 


296 


296 


301 


338 


3.978 




1 


1 


3 


2 




3 


1 


16 


6 


4 


8 


3 


48 


















1 


1 






2 


























1 
1 
5 
2 


1 

7 

I 


4 
3 
3 

4 
2 


3 

2 
2 
7 
2 


7 
1 
1 
6 


10 
1 

4 
4 


12 
4 
1 
3 

1 








4 
1 
1 
5 
3 


41 
16 
21 
54 
10 




1 
1 
6 


1 
2 


2 

I 
3 


5 

1 




















































1 

40 
3 

4 

16 

1 


2 
29 

2 

3 
15 

2 


3 

32 
4 
3 

20 


3 
23 

2 

2 

20 

1 


1 
32 

2 

3 
11 

3 


1 
24 

I 

3 
21 

1 


1 
24 

2 

3 
18 

2 


1 

31 

3 
19 
1 


13 




3i 


38 
2 


30 
4 
2 

23 
2 


23 
5 
3 

22 
4 


357 
27 
29 




26 
2 


II 
2 


222 

21 




1 


I 


1 


1 




1 




1 


2 




I 




9 




13 

58 

6 

35 

25 

2 


5 

42 
8 

1 

31 
26 

1 


2 
58 

7 

I 

38 

24 

I 


3 

57 
7 

28 

14 
3 


7 
31 

4 

1 

25 

35 

2 


5 

38 

5 


2 

43 


1 
46 

1 
1 

15 
6 
1 


3 
33 

1 


2 

38 

5 


6 

38 
2 


5 

47 

5 

2 

35 
15 
3 


54 

529 

51 

6 




18 

20 

1 


II 

12 

I 


9 
13 


19 

17 

2 


28 
18 


292 

22s 

17 




2 




3 


I 


2 


2 


2 


1 


2 


5 


3 


2 


25 




6 


5 


9 


9 


9 


24 


67 


76 


50 


27 


9 


7 


298 




3 


2 


8 


4 


4 


7 


3 


4 


1 


1 


2 


3 


43 




2 
8 


3 
3 


1 
8 


4 
7 


5 
3 


2 
3 


5 
3 


5 
6 


4 
4 


2 


7 
9 


4 

4 


42 
60 




28 


29 


25 


30 


23 


19 


27 


29 


18 


26 


26 


34 


314 




I 
2 


1 
2 
1 


1 
1 
2 








2 
6 


1 
2 


I 
1 


1 
4 


2 
I 

I 


2 
3 


8 




2 
2 


3 


1 


11 
27 




21 

7 


IS 
5 


14 
1 


14 
5 


21 
5 


22 
2 


25 

7 


18 

1 


25 
2 


13 

5 


17 

I 


21 
2 


226 
43 




20 


8 


21 


23 


18 


23 


25 


28 


17 


20 


18 


22 


243 
















4 
21 










4 




18 
2 


7 

1 


21 



21 
2 


18 


21 
2 


28 


17 


19 
1 


18 


21 

1 


230 
9 














1 
48 


2 
63 


7 
44 


9 
51 


3 

46 

2 


4 
38 


2 
34 

1 


8 

43 

1 


6 

44 


6 

42 


3 

46 


1 
49 


52 
548 

4 
























66 
12 
83 
97 
66 


51 
10 
72 
88 
67 


47 
18 
76 
69 
52 


53 
8 

74 
79 
57 


54 
23 
91 
62 
49 


63 
23 
103 
48 
33 


99 
24 
145 
60 
40 


97 
18 
126 
46 
32 


86 

12 

109 

36 

27 


59 
IS 
85 
S3 
38 


57 
6 
78 
66 
49 


52 

10 
73 
70 
45 


784 
179 
1. US 
774 
555 




199 

158 

9 


173 

143 

12 


185 

171 
10 


197 

151 

12 


172 

157 

12 

1 

50 

69 

197 

4 

9 


161 

148 

10 


190 

172 

8 


201 
169 

8 


172 

124 

5 


168 

128 

10 


175 

126 

7 


180 
158 

7 


2,173 

1, 80s 

no 

I 




64 

87 

196 

4 
6 


40 

77 

192 

2 

5 


70 

91 

179 

6 

10 


59 

84 

188 

4 

13 


56 

85 

153 

4 

11 


69 
97 
173 
10 
13 


66 
94 

178 
8 

24 

1 


51 

65 

160 

4 

16 


49 

64 

16s 

2 

16 


54 

73 

163 

5 

6 


56 

80 

191 

2 

9 


684 

966 

2.135 

55 
138 



137 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

Mortality from the Principal Causes, With Ages of 













Borough 


of Richmond 










Cause of Death 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Total 




ISO 


109 


139 


118 


114 


122 


151 


162 


no 


123 


109 


137 


1.544 


















1 


1 










2 






















































































1 
2 


1 




1 
1 


2 


2 






1 
1 
1 
3 


4 

1 

1 
1 


12 
6 
4 

17 
3 










1 






1 
3 
1 










2 

1 


8. Diphtheria and croup .... 


2 


1 


2 






1 
1 


3 


























































1 
10 

1 
1 
4 








1 
12 


1 
2 ' 

4 

8 
3 










1 
8 
2 

10 


4 

I4S 

14 

n 

100 

7 


13. Tuberculosis pulmonalis . . 

14. Tuberculous meningitis. . . 

15. Other forms of tuberculosis 

16. Cancer, malignant tumors. 

17. Meningitis, simple 


12 

1 
1 
6 

1 


16 

1 


12 
1 


18 


18 

2 
8 


12 
3 
1 
8 
1 


12 

1 

10 


13 

3 
8 




7 

1 


7 

1 


10 


14 












17a. (Of which) cerebrospinal 














3 












3 
























18. Apoplexy and softening of 


S 
28 

1 


2 

24 
1 
1 

12 
9 

1 

4 


7 
26 


3 

15 


4 
16 


16 

1 


2 

15 


2 
13 


2 
7 


1 
15 


I 
11 


2 
29 

1 


31 

215 

4 

1 

101 

82 
10 

15 

106 

13 

10 
21 

189 

8 
3 
13 

98 

15 

88 


19. Organic heart disease 




















22. Pneumonia (excluding 

broncho-pneumonia) .... 
22a. Broncho-pneumonia 

23. Other respiratory diseases. 

24. Diseases of stomach (can- 


16 
14 
3 


8 
16 
2 

3 

2 

3 

1 
3 

II 

I 

1 

5 

1 

6 


8 
6 


11 
6 


10 

4 
2 


5 
5 
1 

1 

23 

2 


4 
6 
1 

2 

29 

1 


3 
3 


5 

4 


4 
7 


IS 

2 


2 
2 

1 
1 

17 

1 




1 

20 

I 

1 


2 
16 

1 






25. Diarrhceal diseases (under 




3 
3 

11 

1 


4 

1 
2 

14 


5 

1 
2 

16 


2 

1 

1 
3 

20 


26. Appendicitis and typh- 


1 

3 
1 

19 
I 


1 

8 
•1 


27. Hernia and intestinal ob- 




4 

19 

2 


5 

18 


29. Bright 's disease and acute 


12 
I 


24 

1 


30. Diseases of women (not 




1 
1 

9 


1 
3 

7 


32. Other puerperal diseases . . 

33. Congenital debility and 


I 

8 

1 

6 


3 

1 

7 


3 

8 
2 

6 


1 
4 

7 


1 

9 

2 

10 






1 

5 

1 

7 


1 

n 

1 

7 


15 
5 

12 


14 

1 

9 




35. Violent deaths (suicide ex- 


6 


5 
















2 
9 
1 






L 




2 

83 

3 




5 
1 


7 


6 


6 


7 


9 

1 


9 


7 


7 


6 


5 








1" 














19 


1 
11 














1 

15 

1 


1 

9 


2 
13 


17 


5 

187 

4 




14 


19 


17 


16 


17 


20 

3 


38. Causes not known or ill- 


























17 
1 
20 
S3 
38 


8 
3 
17 

34 
23 


15 
3 

21 
42 
28 


13 

3 

20 

37 

27 


8 

2 

16 

32 

23 


22 
2 
27 
37 
24 


36 

11 
S3 
41 
33 


51 

9 

65 

30 

24 


24 
8 
34 
24 
20 


27 
5 

36 
29 

20 


17 
3 
27 
29 
23 


18 
3 
26 
50 
39 


256 
S3 
362 
438 
322 














93 

57 
4 


71 

38 

2 


76 

63 

2 


77 

41 

2 


68 
46 

4 


78 

44 

4 


96 

55 
2 


98 
64 

4 


69 

41 

1 


67 
56 

2 


64 

45 
3 


74 
63 


931 

613 

30 










75 

8 

60 

1 
6 


39 

6 

57 
1 
6 


55 

8 

69 

7 


49 

11 

49 

2 

7 


51 
8 

52 
1 


49 

8 

55 

1 


66 

18 

60 

2 


81 
9 

65 
2 

5 


48 

12 

40 

3 


43 

12 

66 


44 
12 
48 


57 
13 
60 


657 

125 

681 

16 

65 








1 2 


Others 


7 2 1 4 ' S 



























138 



VITAL STATISTICS. 
Decedents for Year Ending December 31, 1 91 2 













City of New 


York 












Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Total. 


6,675 


6,545 


7,029 


6.787 


6,359 


5.352 


5,932 


5,78o 




5,640 


5.466 


6,294 


73.008 


42 


33 


25 


20 


18 


31 


42 


67 


78 


66 


45 


32 


499 






1 




1 


1 


1 


3 


5 


5 


1 


2 


20 


1 
33 


1 
66 


2 


90 


133 


130 


78 


55 


28 


9 


7 


13 


29 


671 


42 


66 


100 


112 


81 


59 


37 


22 


9 


19 


24 


44 


615 


20 


12 


23 


17 


37 


21 


35 


33 


34 


23 


13 


19 


287 


105 


128 


129 


122 


104 


89 


77 


SI 


52 


62 


93 


115 


1,125 


35 


45 


49 


37 


16 


6 


4 


3 


4 


11 


19 


40 


269 




























36 


59 


59 


62 


44 


33 


29 


21 


18 


14 


16 


26 


417 


775 


837 


891 


822 


758 


657 


651 


655 


566 


633 


628 


7i8 


8,591 


49 


76 


80 


108 


94 


63 


69 


49 


66 


53 


44 


38 


789 


45 


42 


47 


50 


70 


SO 


42 


43 


49 


53 


62 


48 


601 


327 


322 


341 


339 


346 


313 


340 


338 


325 


341 


352 


387 


4.071 


29 


31 


44 


37 


34 


4i 


39 


32 


26 


15 


21 


24 


373 


10 


14 


25 


20 


16 


20 


33 


17 


11 


8 


1 1 


n 


196 


156 


120 


no 


94 


91 


64 


77 


64 


74 


50 


69 


84 


1.053 


1,014 


860 


879 


764 


666 


660 


627 


577 


582 


700 


707 


854 


8,890 


107 


78 


88 


86 


70 


38 


29 


24 


32 


50 


65 


65 


732 


. x 3 


21 


13 


19 


16 


11 


5 


6 


7 


4 


16 


20 


151 


635 


673 


673 


520 


520 


320 


215 


204 


188 


343 


392 


635 


5,318 


483 


461 


543 


531 


542 


342 


268 


225 


208 


306 


326 


426 


4,661 


39 


40 


52 


45 


39 


4i 


38 


3i 


29 


44 


29 


52 


479 


■ 37 


30 


44 


39 


38 


25 


35 


25 


33 


57 


36 


33 


432 


134 


116 


180 


179 


190 


226 


771 


92s 


695 


422 


192 


119 


4.149 


44 


41 


64 


62 


57 


63 


75 


59 


52 


35 


40 


45 


637 


61 


46 


45 


55 


60 


45 


56 


46 


47 


48 


45 


39 


593 


88 


53 


81 


76 


76 


66 


75 


88 


5S 


93 


84 


91 


926 


474 


497 


501 


5S6 


449 


430 


455 


419 


374 


487 


496 


556 


5,724 


23 


17 


28 


22 


25 


18 


33 


14 


17 


18 


18 


20 


253 


20 


IS 


19 


24 


17 


12 


10 


20 


13 


8 


7 


7 


172 


48 


48 


47 


52 


35 


34 


34 


42 


36 


38 


43 


47 


504 


371 


341 


394 


347 


402 


341 


436 


438 


403 


414 


354 


335 


4,576 


63 


55 


52 


57 


50 


40 


32 


34 


29 


5i 


41 


35 


539 


318 


284 


305 


341 


329 


325 


443 


353 


295 


296 


346 


325 


3,960 














75 
332 


6 

326 


1 

272 








82 


293 


247 


275 


3ii 


317 


301 


273 


322 


310 


3.579 


25 


37 


30 


30 


12 


24 


36 


21 


22 


23 


24 


15 


299 


62 


66 


76 


70 


72 


69 


55 


61 


55 


66 


62 


88 


802 


940 


961 


957 


953 


876 


737 


734 


773 


677 


800 


763 


895 


10,066 


6 


4 


1 


6 


6 


3 


8 


7 


7 


S 


4 


1 


61 


i,i37 


1,040 


1,254 


1,186 


1,218 


980 


1.494 


i,57i 


1,317 


1,196 


980 


916 


14,289 


257 


300 


378 


426 


427 


306 


341 


312 


227 


214 


190 


255 


3.633 


1.595 


1,633 


1,959 


1,943 


1,985 


1,552 


2,111 


2,083 


1,720 


1,614 


1.376 


1.407 


20,978 


1,356 


1,279 


1,254 


1,202 


1,026 


806 


862 


799 


771 


994 


1,026 


1,288 


12,663 


927 


900 


813 


822 


693 


527 


585 


546 


514 


679 




861 


8.564 


3.724 


3,627 


3,88l 


3.7S5 


3,509 


2,929 


3.290 


3,248 


2.774 


3,055 


2.976 


3.423 


40.221 


2,951 


2,918 


3,148 


3,002 


2,850 


2,423 


2,642 


2,532 


2,375 


2,585 




2,871 


32,787 


229 


240 


255 


215 


228 


179 


218 


196 


170 


197 


189 


1SI 


2.497 


10 


4 


9 


8 


3 


9 


10 


9 


3 


12 


7 


5 


89 


2,434 


2,417 


2,653 


2,632 


2,427 


2,179 


2,410 


2,349 


1,97" 


2,265 


2,087 


2,345 


28,174 


2,874 


2,832 


3,026 


2,869 


2,688 


2,150 


2,408 


2,406 


2,150 


2,272 


2,259 


2,702 


30.645 


1. 134 


1,107 


1,147 


1.073 


1,018 


820 


877 


799 


828 


890 


933 


1,061 


11,687 


84 


65 


91 


61 


53 


38. 


45 


47 


36 


55 


55 


60 


690 


149 


124 


112 


IS- 


175 


165 


192 


178 


149 


158 


132 


126 


1,812 



139 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

CITY OF 
Deaths of Males by Age, and Cause of Death, 



Cause of Death 



I. General Diseases. 



3- 

4- 

5. 

6. 

7- 

8. 

9- 
10. 
II. 
12. 

13- 
14. 
IS- 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19- 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23- 
24. 
25- 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 

30. 

31- 

32. 

33- 

34- 

35- 

36. 

37. 

38a. 

38b 

39. 

40. 

41. 

42. 

43- 

44. 

45. 

46. 

47. 
48. 
49. 
50. 
51. 
52. 
53. 
54. 
55. 
56. 
57. 
58. 
59. 



Typhoid fever 

Typhus fever 

Relapsing fever 

Malarial fever 

Smallpox 

Measles 

Scarlet fever 

Whooping cough 

Diphtheria and croup 

Influenza 

Miliary fever 

Asiatic cholera 

Cholera nostras 

Dysentery 

Plague 

Yellow fever 

Leprosy 

Erysipelas 

Other epidemic diseases 

Pyaemia, septicemia 

Glanders 

Malignant pustule 

Hydrophobia 

Tetanus, trismus 

Mycoses 

Pellagra 

Beriberi 

Tuberculosis of lungs 

Acute miliary tuberculosis 

Tuberculous meningitis 

Abdominal tuberculosis 

Pott's disease 

White swelling 

Tuberculosis of other organs 

General tuberculosis 

Rachitis 

Syphilis 

Soft chancre 

Gonococcic infection 

Cancers, etc., of the mouth 

Cancer of stomach, liver 

Cancer of intestines, rectum 

Cancer of female genital organs 

Cancer of the breast 

Cancer of the skin . 

Cancer of other organs and unspecified ..... 

Other tumors (except of female genital 
organs) 

Acute articular rheumatism 

Chronic rheumatism and gout 

Scurvy 

Diabetes 

Exophthalmic goitre 

Addison's disease 

Leukaemia 

Anaemia, chlorosis 

Other general diseases 

Alcoholism, acute and chronic 

Lead poisoning ; 

Other chronic poisonings of occupation 

Other chronic poisonings 



20 
2 
671 
615 
287 
1,125 
269 



343 

23 

91 

5 



36 



15 
1 
36i 
334 
132 
585 
124 



II. 



Diseases of Nervous System and 
Organs of Sense. 



60. Encephalitis 

61. Simple meningitis (of which) 

6 la. Cerebrospinal meningitis 

62. Locomotor ataxia 

63. Other diseases of spinal cord (of which) . . . 
63a. Acute anterior poliomyelitis 



8,591 

182 

789 

195 

75 

37 

80 

32 

3i 

422 

II 

32 

153 

1,608 

608 

580 

350 

66 

706 

27 
222 

68 

7 

870 

48 

II 
108 
134 

53 
570 

16 



137 
67 
34 

166 

4 



106 

4 



5,673 

122 

418 

106 

44 

21 

63 

18 

17 

253 

8 

7 

123 

801 

279 



16 



4 

39 

422 

II 
98 

29 

5 

362 

3 

5 

7i 

45 

32 

454 

15 



4 

5 

9 

126 



2<> 



33 


19 


373 


208 


196 


108 


127 


104 


230 


115 


70 


40 



342 

224 

128 
466 

20 



IS 



89 



74 

38 

276 

47 

6 

6 

15 

7 

17 

129 



5 

120 

63 



140 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



NEW YORK. 

for the Year Ending December ji, IQI2. 



10 


15 


20 


25 


30 


35 


40 


45 


SO 


55 


60 


65 


70 


75 


80 


•0 
£0 


| 

u 

Q 

O 



S3 
c 

IS 
O 


D 

§ 

a 


13 


38 


41 


35 


42 


42 


37 


18 


13 


9 


6 


4 


2 








S 


1 
























































3 


1 


3 




1 


I 


1 




1 


1 
































I 

16 


3 

8 






























6 
3 
6 

12 
4 








1 


5 


1 


1 


1 








1 
































10 

3 


2 
1 


3 
3 


1 
2 


4 


4 

7 


1 
4 


3 
9 


I 
IS 






1 
11 














10 


8 


12 


8 


1 


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1 


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1 






























































































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15 


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12 


8 


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6 

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6 
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2 


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3 




















































1 
1 




























2 




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1 


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3 


1 


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1 
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909 
8 
5 
2 
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5 
5 
1 




























































1 
29 




25 
3 

22 
2 
4 
I 
2 


232 
S 
15 
6 
4 
2 
S 
2 


497 

12 
IS 
II 

s 

I 

s 


646 

14 

6 

5 

4 
I 

7 


745 
7 
9 
6 

2 

1 
5 

1 


801 
8 
5 
6 
2 
1 
3 
2 


623 
6 

2 
4 
3 

5 

1 


466 
2 
5 
3 

1 
1 
1 
2 


265 
3 


190 

5 


100 
2 


47 
1 


21 
2 


6 


1 


297 

19 

22 

9 

5 
3 
2 
1 
3 
14 


6 




1 




1 


4 


3 
2 


I 

I 


































3 

1 


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4 
















































1 
1 


7 
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14 

1 
1 
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7 


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19 


18 
2 


IS 


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6 


8 

1 


6 


3 


1 


2 




1 


























I 


1 
2 


2 
4 
7 


3 
8 

4 


7 
31 
11 


6 

57 
13 


12 
9i 
22 


9 

in 

SO 


19 

112 

36 


16 
139 
32 


19 
104 
38 


17 
81 
28 


7 
33 
10 


2 

16 
12 


2 

5 

4 


3 
9 

I 








1 




















2 

3 

38 

I 
8 










1 

7 

38 

I 

1 


I 

4 

20 












I 
3 


7 


1 
7 






2 2 
25 37 

I 


2 
36 

3 

4 
3 


2 

5i 

2 
3 
6 


7 
53 


2 
51 


2 
15 


4 
4 

1 
2 
1 








11 


15 


5 


3 




18 


8 

2 


5 


4 
3 


3 
I 


4 
1 


5 
3 


4 
2 


3 

2 


2 

2 


1 
1 


2 
















6 


4 


7 


9 

2 


9 


14 


20 


38 


44 


59 


60 

1 


37 


30 


12 


10 


2 


4 


1 




8 
1 


I 
S 
3 

1 


1 
4 
1 
2 
6 




1 
2 
4 


8 
4 


1 
4 

7 


1 
9 
8 
2 
67 
5 




















2 

1 

1 

23 

1 


3 

I 


1 

1 

38 

2 


3 
3 

1 
14 


4 
3 

11 


3 

1 
I 
9 


I 
I 






1 
























58 


74 
2 


79 
2 


69 
3 


4 


2 




8 










































1 

5 

13 

S 

2 

1 


1 

1 
7 
6 
2 
4 


2 
I 

5 
1 
1 
2 

1 


2 

1 

4 
2 
3 
5 

1 


1 

1 
8 
3 
10 
6 










1 




1 






1 










4 

2 

10 

9 


1 
2 
1 
15 
7 


2 
5 


I 
2 










10 
6 

2 
2 


8 
5 
1 
2 

1 


2 

1 

18 

12 


1 




1 




4 
I 

2 

4 


1 




18 
6 
1 


II 

5 


9 

7 


4 
4 


1 
2 


1 





































141 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

CITY OF 
Deaths of Males by A ge, and Cause of Death, for 



Cause of Death 



64. Apoplexy, cerebral haemorrhage 

65. Softening of brain 

66. Paralysis, unspecified 

67. General paresis 

68. Other forms of insanity 

69. Epilepsy 

70. Convulsions (not puerperal) 

71. Convulsions of infants 

72. Chorea 

73a. Hysteria 

73b. Neuralgia and Neuritis 

74. Other nervous diseases 

75a. Follicular conjunctivitis 

75b. Trachoma 

75c. Other diseases of eye and appendages 
76. Diseases of ear 



III. Diseases of Circulatory System. 



77. 
78. 
79. 
80. 
81. 
82. 
83. 

84. 
85. 



86. 
87. 
88. 
89. 
90. 
91. 
92. 
93. 
94- 
95. 
96. 
97. 



Pericarditis 

Acute endocarditis 

Organic heart diseases 

Angina pectoris 

Diseases of arteries, aneurism, etc 

Embolism, thrombosis 

Diseases of veins (haemorrhoids, varices 

phlebitis, etc.) 

Diseases of lymphatics (lymphangitis, etc.) 
Haemorrhage 



IV. Diseases of Respiratory System. 



Diseases of nasal fossae 

Diseases of the larynx 

Diseases of thyroid gland 

Acute bronchitis 

Chronic bronchitis 

Broncho-pneumonia 

Lobar pneumonia 

Pleurisy 

Congestion of lungs, pulmonary apoplexy. . 

Gangrene of lung 

Asthma 

Pulmonary emphysema 

Other diseases of respiratory system (tuber- 
culosis excepted) 



1,023 

30 

60 

256 

80 

112 

2 

269 

5 

8 

13 

142 

3 



518 
13 
26 

186 

41 

62 

2 

144 



187 



47 

625 

8,890 

176 

2,104 

97 

37 
28 

4 



3 

30 

17 

732 

151 

4,661 

5,318 

233 

49 

4 

85 

23 



99a. 

99b. 
100. 
IOI. 
102. 
103. 
IO4. 
105. 

106. 
107. 
108. 
IO9. 

110a. 

nob 

in. 

112. 

113. 

114. 

US- 

116. 

117. 

118. 



V. Diseases of Digestive System. 



Diseases of teeth and gums 

Other diseases of mouth 

Angina and other diseases of pharynx. . . 

Diseases of oesophagus 

Ulcer of the stomach 

Other diseases ofstomach (cancer excepted). 
Diarrhoea and enteritis (under two years) 
Diarrhoea and enteritis (two years and over) 

(Of which) due to alcoholism 

Ankylostomiasis 

Intestinal parasites 

Appendicitis and typhlitis 

Hernia, intestinal obstruction 

Diseases of anus and stercoral fistulae. . . 

Other diseases of intestines 

Acute yellow atrophy of liver 

Hydatid tumor of liver 

Cirrhosis of liver 

Biliary calculi 

Other diseses of liver 

Diseases of spleen 

Simple peritonitis (non-puerperal) 

Other diseases of digestive system (except 
tuberculosis and cancer) 



27 

4 

88 

6 

235 

197 

3,948 

550 



126 



21 

335 

4. SOI 

105 

1,082 

47 

21 



3 

16 

6 

378 

77 

2,435 

3.084 

144 

32 

3 

41 

11 



16 

3 

56 

3 

169 

104 

2,104 

270 



35 



5 

637 

593 

27 

40 

12 

4 

926 

140 

168 

5 

29 

4i 



269 

1 

,195 

307 

16 



3 

361 

294 

12 

19 

6 

3 

593 

44 

79 

3 

14 

22 



545 

219 

19 



154 
101 

14 



14 



33 

1,829 



67 



6 
275 



144 



333 

4 

l,97i 

686 

54 

3 



44 

2,104 

104 



IS 

54 



54 



29 

7 



142 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



NEW YORK 

the Year Ending December 31, IQI2. — Continued. 





10 


IS 


20 


25 


30 


35 


40 


45 


50 


55 


60 


65 


70 


75 


80 


•a 

in ? 

00O 


T3 
S 

U 


c 
IS 
U 


a) 

s 

i 

•— > 






1 


4 


6 


10 
2 


15 


21 


36 


45 
1 
4 

29 
5 


60 
2 
1 

17 
2 
1 


84 
3 
2 

II 
3 
3 


75 
1 
5 

I 

1 


73 
1 
1 
3 
1 
3 


43 
3 

6 

4 

1 


18 


24 


9 


1 
















1 

34 

6 

9 


2 

27 

4 

5 


2 
2 


2 
















1 
2 
5 


19 

4 
7 


32 
3 
3 


8 


1 






3 

1 


4 
7 


3 
7 
1 










4 












































8 






















































1 
1 
3 


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5 


1 
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1 


1 
1 
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3 




















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5 


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1 


































































































4 

1 

6 

59 


8 

1 

19 
95 

1 
1 


14 

31 
93 


9 

1 

25 

112 


4 

2 

19 

163 


5 

1 

33 

243 

5 

19 

2 

5 

1 


2 

34 

305 

8 

29 

2 

3 


5 

36 

357 

5 

50 

3 


6 

2 

40 

487 

16 

87 

3 

2 


1 

4 

35 

466 

15 

104 

3 

2 


4 

8 

514 

17 

154 

8 

1 


2 

3 
5 

501 
17 

162 
II 

3 


1 

2 

6 
447 

8 
185 

3 








2 

2 

9 

122 

1 

20 




















5 
306 

6 
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163 
6 

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3 

1 
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1 
























1 










1 
1 


























1 

1 


1 
2 










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2 










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1 


2 

1 






















3 

2 

16 

245 

8 

5 


1 
4 
27 
268 
6 
3 
1 

2 

4 


1 

28 
224 

12 
2 

3 

I 

2 

I 


2 

7 

39 

223 

12 

2 
1 
4 
1 

2 


3 

9 

32 

216 

4 


3 

8 

47 

189 

10 


2 

9 

58 

180 

7 
3 


8 

13 

43 

112 

2 

2 

1 

8 


3 
8 
39 
73 
2 
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6 

7 

20 

43 

2 

2 


5 

3 

23 

24 


13 












1 
9 
105 
7 
2 








6 

17 


6 

73 

6 


13 

162 

6 

3 


10 

190 

5 

2 


97 

131 

4 

3 


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6 


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2 
3 






















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1 


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1 

2 

10 

9 


1 
1 
3 
9 








2 




















i 
1 


1 


8 


9 

6 


17 
2 


20 
3 


23 
3 


21 

7 


24 
2 


16 

4 


12 
3 


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6 


2 

4 


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5 

2 

60 

8 
























3 


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7 


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14 


12 


7 


8 


14 


16 


12 


15 


6 


6 


2 


























































1 

18 

19 

2 

2 


1 
23 
21 

1 
2 


















1 
8 
3 








33 

1 


30 

7 


37 
5 
2 
1 


37 
11 

1 


39 

12 

I 

I 


41 
16 
I 
2 
I 
2 

45 
1 
5 


19 

27 

1 

3 

2 


15 

14 

1 

I 


14 
23 


5 
23 


4 

16 

1 


1 
8 


1 
3 


3 


2 
















I 




1 


1 
















1 






















1 

26 

2 

6 
























2 


1 
1 
4 


9 
2 
5 


85 

10 

6 


104 
4 
7 
I 
2 

1 


92 

7 

11 

1 


74 
8 
11 


61 
3 

7 


46 
1 

4 


31 
3 
5 


11 
2 
2 


3 


2 


7 
I 

2 


1 






I 


1 


1 


















1 
1 


1 
1 


1 
3 


1 
3 


3 

6 


1 
2 






1 
2 




















1 


2 



























143 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



CITY OF 
Deaths of Males by Age, and Cause of Death, for 



Cause of Death 


V 

X 

O O 

Hffl 


< 
< 




1 


2 


3 


4 


1/5 

u 

S-v 
°£ 


5 


VI. Diseases of Genito-Urinary System. 


550 
5,174 


293 
2,710 


25 
2 


10 

1 


7 
3 


6 

4 


7 
2 


55 
12 


8 




10 






122. Other diseases of the kidneys and appen- 


120 

44 

56 

24 
102 

13 
2 

95 

23 
8 

20 

ios 

3 1 

150 

80 

79 

172 

161 

22 

7 

2 


62 
31 

43 

20 

102 

13 


2 










2 


1 


123. Calculi of the urinary tract 












1 










1 




125. Diseases of urethra, urinary abcesss, etc. . . . 


























127. Non-venereal diseases of male genital organs 


9 










9 


































1 . . 
















1 






























132. Salpingitis and other diseases of female geni- 


















133. Diseases of breast (not puerperal nor cancer) 
VII. Puerperal Diseases. 
























































































138. Puerperal albuminuria and convulsions. . . . 


























































































3 

44 
29 
83 
45 

148 
11 


















VIII. Diseases of Skin and Cellular Tissue. 


24 
23 
52 
27 

89 

8 


1 


1 






1 


3 


1 










8 
12 

10 


1 




1 


1 
1 

3 


11 
13 

25 

1 


2 1 
6 




IX. Diseases of Locomotory System. 
147. Arthritis, other diseases of joints (except 


7 


4 


1 
1 










149. Other diseases of organs of locomotion 

X. Malformations. 

XI. Diseases of Infancy. 
151. Congenital debility, icterus and sclerema. . . 


4 

708 

3,868 
954 
348 

7 

539 

112 
312 
96 
12 
146 
53 
51 


3 

427 

2,105 

545 

214 

6 

194 

73 
213 

85 

7 

134 

48 

26 


1 
396 

2,101 

545 

214 

6 


1 

15 

4 








2 

419 

2,105 

545 

214 

6 


6 


3 


4 


1 




























XII. Diseases of Old Age. 










XIII. External Causes. 






























































































161. Suicide by precipitation from height 
























1 







144 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



NEW YORK. 

the Year Ending December 31, IQ12. — Continued. 



10 


IS 


20 

14 
41 


25 

16 

74 


30 


35 


40 


45 


50 


55 


60 


65 


70 


75 


80 


■a 

V. _ 


B 

u 

"3 
O 


g 




8 

(4 


6 
8 


ro 
18 


24 
97 


20 
144 


18 
230 


19 

240 


33 
317 


24 
311 


16 
308 


8 
305 


11 
263 


3 

177 


2 
105 


6 
50 


13 
87 


"0 


I 

I 


1 


1 

1 


4 


3 


4 

2 

1 
1 

I 


8 

5 
r 


2 
3 


4 
3 


5 

2 
2 
2 
6 


3 

1 

4 
5 

11 

1 


3 

6 
3 

4 
17 


9 

1 

7 

1 

14 


5 

3 
9 

25 


4 

2 

5 

1 

16 


1 

2 

7 


2 
1 








I 

I 






1 
1 


I 










4 

1 


1 
2 










4 


5 


I 










1 


r 














































































































































































































































1 


























































































































































































































































































































































































































1 




1 


2 
4 

2 

1 


I 

4 
2 
3 

5 
1 


3 

6 

1 

4 


1 
4 
4 
3 

8 


1 
4 
3 

I 

2 
2 


2 

1 
2 


2 
2 

1 


3 

2 
I 
2 

2 

I 


S 


3 


1 


I 






1 
2 










3 

I 

9 


7 

9 

I 


3 

1 

2 


1 

2 






2 














7 


4 
1 


3 


1 


















































I 
I 
































1 






























9 

82 

24 

5 


































































































































































I 

14 
29 
9 
1 
10 
6 
2 


4 
22 
8 
1 
11 
5 
2 


8 

3 

18 
8 


12 

2 
7 
5 


21 
I 

6 

4 


39 

1 


54 

I 


59 












6 

14 

1 


10 

28 
8 
1 

18 
4 
S 


8 

19 
9 
I 
10 
5 
6 


S 
21 
6 
1 
16 
6 
2 


8 

21 

8 

18 
8 

2 


11 

24 

12 

1 

16 

6 

1 


3 


I 
I 
I 




I 


3 
3 




4 














5 


14 

1 
2 


7 
1 
3 


5 
4 


1 
1 


3 






1 






I 










1 1 



























145 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



CITY OF 

Deaths of Males by Age, and Cause of Death, for 



Cause of Death 


V 

K 

<D 

w 

"3.C 



Hen 


p 

bo 
< 

< 


0» 


1 


2 


3 


4 


u 

a 


5 






19 

1 
21 

4 

57 

77 

461 

358 

453 

19 

10 

996 


15 

1 

7 

2 

24 

38 

207 

214 

416 

16 

10 

702 
















163. 


































1 
1 

3 
23 

2 

26 

1 

2 

42 


















165b. 




I 
II 
14 

2 


3 

2 

28 

I 

I 


1 

44 

1 


1 




4 

4 

130 

16 

10 


166. 








30 


17 


168. 








4 


3 










I 
2 






1 
12 


12 


2 
60 


172. 




14 


20 


173- 








80 

713 

21 


77 

596 

18 






1 

14 

1 






1 

54 

4 


1 
80 


175. 


Deaths by other crushing agencies, wagons, 


I 


5 


13 

1 


22 
1 1 


176. 

177a. 


Deaths from injuries inflicted by animals 
(not snakebites, hydrophobia or stings) . . 


177b. 






















178. 




12 

82 

3 

17 

165 

41 
93 
110 

45 
41 
81 

1 


10 

48 

3 

17 

146 

36 
65 

86 
















179. 




6 


1 








7 


1 


180. 










181. 












1 


1 
1 

1 

17 

1 


1 

4 
4 


182. 




1 

1 
16 








183. 


Homicides by cutting or piercing instru- 










184. 










1 


185. 








1 


186a. 










186b. 




29 
62 


1 
7 


2 


1 


1 
2 


3 


3 

14 


1 
4 


186c. 




XIV. Ill-defined or Not Specified Causes. 


188. 




















189. 




60 


34 


8 


18 


4 






30 












I 


20,74s 


11,762 


706 


601 


327 


210 


149 


1,993 


344 








9,981 
4,071 


6,465 
1,668 


150 
3 


153 

4 


80 
2 


54 
2 


32 

1 


469 
12 


106 
3 








— Diseases of nervous system and organs of 


II. 


2,953 

12,008 

n,34i 

7,683 

6,339 

676 

201 

163 

708 

4,829 

539 
4,762 


i,6S5 
6,133 
6,250 
4,178 
3,275 


227 

24 

1,801 

1,952 

39 


84 

13 

831 

292 

11 


34 
10 
280 
82 
10 


30 

6 

90 

34 
10 


17 
12 
62 
30 
9 


392 

65 

3,064 
2,390 

79 


37 
74 
116 
54 
19 


TTT 




IV. 




V. 




VI. 
VII. 




VIII 
IX. 




126 
100 
427 

2,656 
194 

3,431 


21 

II 

396 

2,652 


2 

8 

IS 

4 


4 
3 


1 
2 
4 


3 
3 
1 


27 

28 

419 

2,656 


2 
6 
6 


X. 




XT 




XTT 










XTTT, 




64 


57 


83 


66 


60 


330 


197 








802 

299 

3.66r 


602 

247 

2,582 




















18 
46 








1 
59 


19 
311 


5 
192 






57 


83 


66 






XTV. 


61 


34 


8 


18 


4 






30 
















40,221 
32,787 


7,901 
6,388 


1,936 
1,697 


837 

714 


4S3 

409 


346 

297 


",473 
9,505 


855 
799 


















73,008 


14,289 


3,633 


i>55i 


862 


643 


20,978 


1,654 









146 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



NEW YORK 

the Year Ending December 31, 1912. — Continued. 



10 


IS 


20 


25 


30 


35 


40 


45 


SO 


55 


60 


65 


70 


75 


80 


c 

00O 


Colored 
Chinese 


a 




1 


1 


2 


3 


2 

I 


2 


2 




2 












































2 
1 
3 
3 
9 
30 
S3 

1 
59 




2 


1 


1 











































I 

I 

I 

27 

I 

I 

22 


2 
3 

S 

27 
2 


2 
2 

4 
14 
43 

2 


2 
2 
3 

21 
22 

1 
43 


4 
1 
6 
9 

33 
2 
1 

7i 


1 
S 
3 
21 
51 
2 

78 


3 
3 

21 

45 

1 

2 

68 


1 

4 

7 

22 

33 


1 

1 
3 
13 

25 

3 


1 

1 

1 

13 

12 










1 
1 








3 
6 
9 
3 


I 

8 
3 


1 

1 

4 


1 


2 

1 

10 










1 
3 


4 


1 


1 




















19 


34 


56 


39 


41 


31 


16 


8 


8 


7 


15 


2 




46 

I 


7 

28 

2 


6 
S3 


20 
SI 


6 

44 
2 


8 

48 
1 


8 
50 


8 
31 


S 

27 

3 


5 

24 

2 


2 

'"24 
2 












3 

5 






16 


11 


4 
1 


2 


3 






































































I 


I 








1 
7 
1 
3 
19 

7 

7 

12 


1 
5 

2 
IS 

3 

7 


2 
3 

1 

9 

2 
3 

10 


1 
6 


3 


2 

I 


3 


1 
2 


1 












I 




6 

1 
2 

18 

8 


1 


1 




1 




I 
I 


2 

9 


2 
28 

6 

7 

II 


1 
32 


2 

4 

1 
2 
4 


5 


I 

I 


















2 


1 








11 

3 

1 
1 


14 

1 

1 












I 
2 


2 
2 


7 6 

8 K 


1 
8 


I 

4 


2 
2 


1 
1 


3 


1 
1 


1 


.... 










4 


I 
3 


5 

4 


2 
3 


2 
6 


8 


2 
4 


4 
5 


S 
5 


1 
1 


1 


1 
1 


1 




















5 


























































1 






1 




1 










1 








3 






























144 


369 


659 


824 


967 


1,222 


1,152 


1,013 


894 


652 


575 


424 


293 


134 


70 


33 


453 


37 


8 


59 
5 


271 
10 


546 
21 


683 
26 


776 
30 


937 

76 


828 
115 


644 
168 


481 
208 


276 
220 


202 
247 


108 
214 


48 

172 


23 
75 


6 

47 


2 
19 


358 
18 


29 
3 


7 

I 


24 
66 
23 

42 
IS 


34 
118 
88 
49 
30 


50 

130 

126 

72 

62 


43 

144 

189 

95 

95 


60 
199 
214 
130 
130 


77 
309 
282 
162 

179 


109 
383 
318 
191 

258 


109 
451 
273 
210 
269 


123 
638 
291 
199 
367 


117 
629 
275 
I5S 
36l 


133 
702 
264 
141 
357 


126 
702 
271 
121 
345 


103 
651 
189 
86 
316 


65 
458 
130 

48 
208 


26 

249 

81 

21 
121 


27 
165 
56 
12 
64 


42 
155 
249 

99 
103 


3 

4 
8 
S 
6 


1 
I 

2 


3 

7 

1 


5 


5 
9 


7 

II 

I 


5 
2 


6 
3 


10 
6 


10 

4 


12 
8 


9 

4 


5 
3 


5 

1 


8 
3 


8 


3 


1 


3 

2 

9 

106 




























































1 
261 


191 


8 
149 


12 
102 


21 
59 


39 
27 


54 
24 


59 
18 




112 


128 


263 


305 


294 


343 


327 


301 


61 


23 


I 


1 

2 

109 


13 

11 

104 


39 

41 

183 


76 

so 

179 


6l 

32 

201 


60 

33 

250 


67 

18 

242 


73 

14 
214 


71 

7 

183 


55 

6 

^30 


40 

2 

107 


23 

4 
75 


13 
2 

44 


a 
23 


6 

1 
17 


18 


4 
16 
42 


3 

16 
4 








1 






1 




1 










1 








3 






























437 
431 


821 
708 


1.377 
1. 199 


1,714 
1,370 


2,001 
1,435 


2,584 
1,636 


2,754 
1,604 


2,641 
I.7I7 


2,794 
1,894 


2,393 
1,861 


2,337 
2,005 


2,109 
1,990 


1,730 
1,732 


1,117 
1,352 


649 
926 


435 
629 


1.285 
1,212 


86 

3 


13 

I 


868 


1,529 


2,576 


3,084 


3,436 


4,220 


4,358 


4.358 


4,688 


4.254 


4.342 


4,099 


3,462 


2,469 


1,569 


1,064 


2,497 


89 


14 



M7 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

CITY OF 
Deaths of Females by Age, and Cause of Death, 



Cause of Death 



12. 
13. 
14. 
IS. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25- 
26. 
27- 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33- 
34- 

35. 

36. 

37. 

38a. 

38b, 

39. 

40. 

41. 

42. 

43- 
44. 

45. 
46. 

47. 
48. 
49- 
50. 
51. 
52. 
53- 
54- 
55. 
56. 
57. 
58. 
59. 



60. 

61. 

61a. 

62. 

63. 

63a, 



I. General Diseases. 



Typhoid fever 

Typhus fever 

Relapsing fever 

Malarial fever 

Smallpox 

Measles 

Scarlet fever 

Whooping cough 

Diphtheria and croup 

Influenza 

Miliary fever 

Asiatic cholera 

Cholera nostras 

Dysentery 

Plague 

Yellow fever 

Leprosy 

Erysipelas 

Other epidemic diseases 

Pyaemia, septicaemia 

Glanders 

Malignant pustule 

Hydrophobia 

Tetanus, trismus 

Mycoses 

Pellagra 

Beriberi 

Tuberculosis of lungs. 

Acute miliary tuberculosis 

Tuberculous meningitis 

Abdominal tuberculosis 

Pott's disease 

White swelling 

Tuberculosis of other organs 

General tuberculosis 

Rachitis 

Syphilis 

Soft chancre 

Gonococcic infection 

Cancers, etc., of the mouth 

Cancer of stomach, liver 

Cancer of intestines, rectum 

Cancer of female genital organs 

Cancer of the breast 

Cancer of the skin 

Cancer of other organs and unspecified 

Other tumors (except of female genital 

organs) 

Acute articular rheumatism 

Chronic rheumatism and gout 

Scurvy 

Diabetes 

Exophthalmic goitre 

Addison's disease 

Leukagmia 

Anaemia, chlorosis 

Other general diseases 

Alcoholism, acute and chronic 

Lead poisoning 

Other chronic poisonings of occupation 
Other chronic poisonings 



184 



310 
281 
155 
540 
145 



130 
47 
42 

131 
6 



100 
3 



2,918 

60 

371 

89 

31 

16 

17 

14 

16 

169 

3 

25 

30 

807 

329 

580 

346 

27 



16 

124 

39 

2 

508 

45 

6 

37 

89 

21 
Il6 



II. Diseases of Nervous System and 
Organs of Sense. 



Encephalitis 

Simple meningitis (of which) 

Cerebrospinal meningitis 

Locomotor ataxia 

Other diseases of spinal cprd (of which) . 
Acute anterior poliomyelitis 



14 
165 



23 

115 
30 



40 



14 



289 
171 
145 
407 
20 



70 

19 

268 

29 



6 
106 
60 



148 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



NEW YORK 

for the Year Ending December 31, 191 2. 



10 


15 


20 


25 


30 


3S 


40 


45 


50 


55 


60 


65 


70 


75 


80 


•0 


1 

"3 
O 


c 
O 


| 

a 
a 

9 

>-> 


13 


25 


29 


18 


17 


9 


18 


8 


6 


6 


4 


3 


2 


3 






9 




















































3 






I 

I 
I 

5 












1 














































1 

8 
6 
6 
12 
4 










2 






























17 

I 
IS 

I 


S 


2 


1 




1 






















1 




















1 

5 


3 
5 


4 
9 


I 
I 


5 


1 

s 


2 

8 






1 
8 














8 


8 


18 


16 


12 


10 


3 


























































































1 


I 


I 






1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


3 




1 




























































1 
5 




























1 
2 








2 


4 


4 


S 


6 


3 


7 


8 


5 

1 


2 


3 


2 


3 


1 










4 




2 


2 


1 


I 


1 


1 


2 




1 










1 
























1 










































1 

1 


































2 




1 




































































































































66 
3 

12 
4 
7 
3 
2 


249 

14 
11 

7 
6 

1 
1 
1 


444 
1 
9 
9 

1 
1 
1 
2 


444 
4 
7 
8 
1 
2 
1 
1 


404 
7 
7 
3 
5 


38l 
3 
3 
3 


263 

4 

7 


182 


136 


101 


64 


45 
1 
1 
2 
2 


22 

I 


14 


3 


3 


199 
5 
12 
11 










3 
3 


2 
2 


1 
2 


I 
3 












I 

1 


























1 
1 


2 


1 










. . .2 






2 

2 


2 

1 


I 

I 






1 


















1 










1 


























I 


4 
1 
2 


7 

6 
3 
3 
3 


7 
I 

I 


8 


9 


8 


10 


10 


2 




3 


1 








13 
1 
1 

1 
7 
4 
26 
8 
















1 


1 
2 
23 
17 
59 
26 

9 

I 
6 

1 


























5 

61 
28 
74 
35 
1 
31 

2 
5 


4 
90 
33 
89 
44 

2 
27 

1 
6 
4 


3 
113 

38 
107 

55 


129 
46 
60 

42 


1 

125 

49 

61 

39 

3 
35 

1 
5 


6 
97 
32 
39 
33 

2 
23 

2 

I 
6 


1 
73 
39 
22 
22 

I 

21 

3 
3 
3 


3 

40 
15 
11 
13 
3 
10 

6 


2 
26 
9 
9 
11 
3 
5 

1 
2 
4 


10 
1 
2 

4 
3 
4 










3 

9 

14 

5 


14 
8 

3i 

17 
2 

10 

1 
6 
1 








1 
2 














4 


1 
7 








6 


5 


41 40 


15 










24 
1 


10 


11 


5 


5 

4 


2 

1 


1 
3 


4 
4 




















6 


5 
S 


4 

4 


5 
6 


11 
3 

1 
3 
7 
1 
17 


16 
1 

6 
6 


23 
3 
1 
2 

7 


32 

7 
2 
3 
7 
I 
15 


57 
2 

2 
14 

1 
12 

1 


78 
2 
1 
2 
7 
I 
7 


92 
5 

1 
3 
8 
1 
3 


73 
2 


47 


29 

1 


16 
1 


6 


9 


















3 


2 
2 


2 
6 
3 
3 


2 
4 
3 
IS 


1 
9 
1 
4 


5 


2 

1 


2 
1 










1 


2 




.... 






18 


21 




1 






3 






















































2 
9 
6 


1 




2 

1 
5 

4 


1 

2 

1 
1 
3 


1 

1 
1 

S 


I 

7 
4 
2 
8 










1 










1 






1 
5 
2 
4 
6 


1 
1 

3 

8 












1 




4 
2 


7 
2 


5 

1 
3 
12 


1 
I 
3 
5 


2 








1 
















3 

11 


3 
6 


1 
4 












3 


2 


2 


3 

1 


2 




1 













































149 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

CITY OF 
Deaths of Females by Age, and Cause of Death, 



Cause of Death 


w 






be 

< 

< 


H 


1 


2 


3 


4 


in 
u 

-2t3 

O c 
HP 


5 






505 
17 
34 
70 
39 
50 


2 

I 










2 
1 


I 


































































































123 

S 

4 

9 

62 


102 


18 

1 


3 


1 


1 


125 

1 


I 






































2 


6 


2 


2 


1 


13 


2 


















































61 

26 

290 

4.389 

71 
1,022 

50 

16 
8 
3 


10 

2 
3 

4 


5 


1 


2 


4 


22 

2 
19 
25 


9 

28 
65 


III. Diseases of Circulatory System. 








3 

2 


4 
6 


5 
6 


4 
7 














































83. Diseases of veins (hemorrhoids, varices, 
















1 






4 


2 








6 












IV. Diseases of Respiratory System. 






















14 

11 

354 

74 

2,226 

2,234 

89 

17 

I 

44 

12 

IS 

11 

1 

32 

3 

66 

93 

1,844 

280 


4 


4 


1 


2 


1 


12 


1 










215 

1 

961 

247 

12 

2 


39 

482 

181 

8 

1 


13 

1 

148 

70 

10 


1 


1 


269 

2 

1,664 

558 

32 

3 


8 

1 
40 
44 

5 

I 










46 
30 


27 

30 

2 




































1 


1 
















08. Other diseases of respiratory system (tuber- 








1 
1 






1 
3 


I 


V. Diseases of Digestive System. 




2 




















8 


3 


2 


1 




14 


2 

I 

I 
10 










1 

20 

1.563 


1 
6 

281 








2 

33 

1,844 
97 






4 


3 












65 


22 


10 












I 

2 

276 

299 

IS 

21 

6 

1 

333 

96 

89 

2 

15 

19 










































4 


? 


5 


12 
26 


26 

5 






23 


2 










1 
1 


1 


1 

1 


1 




4 
2 


1 




































2 

1 
1 










2 

1 
1 

1 


4 

1 






3 




1 
















1 




118. Other diseases of digestive system (except 






1 















150 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



NEW YORK 

for the Year Ending December ji, 1912. — Continued. 





10 


IS 


20 


25 


30 


35 


40 


45 


50 


55 


60 


65 


70 


75 


80 


•d 
c . 

So 


"9 
c 
q 

"q 




V 

'£ 
O 




to 

I 




I 


2 


3 


2 


1 


9 


12 


22 


47 
2 
1 
7 
3 
3 


55 

9 
6 
3 
3 


57 
2 
8 

1 
2 


79 
2 
5 

7 
I 

I 


69 
2 
2 
5 
3 


80 

4 
4 

4 

1 


36 
2 
3 
2 


27 

2 

I 


11 


























I 

8 
4 
2 


I 
13 
3 

4 


3 

4 














2 
4 
8 


8 

4 
7 


7 
5 
8 








2 


4 
4 


3 
6 












2 






















































8 
1 








I 


1 


1 




































1 

1 
4 


1 
11 


2 
3 

7 










I 
























1 
4 








2 
2 




I 












2 




2 


5 


6 


2 


2 






1 




























































































1 






3 

3 
13 
90 


1 

16 
98 

1 
1 
1 


2 

5 
20 
94 


4 

2 

26 

120 


3 

1 
22 
159 
1 
5 
3 

1 


2 

26 

244 

2 
11 

2 

1 


3 

1 

23 

245 

1 

22 

2 

1 


2 

2 

20 

320 

3 

40 

3 

2 


5 

35 

341 

6 

65 

5 

2 


1 

3 
23 

404 

5 

105 

1 


2 

1 
3 

472 
13 

140 
6 

1 


4 

2 

7 
508 

8 
155 

2 

1 










3 

I 
8 
135 
1 
24 
1 








1 
4 

483 
11 

152 
7 

1 






I 

I 

I48 

2 

80 

. . . t . 

I 








3 
351 

8 
126 

7 

1 


I 

222 

10 

117 

7 




















1 
1 


2 
3 

1 




















2 






1 


























1 


1 


1 
































































1 
1 

3 . 

5 

33 

155 

7 
















1 








I 

10 

26 
2 


1 

1 

8 

42 

2 


1 
1 
17 
75 
1 
2 


1 
1 
1 
11 
87 
4 
1 
1 


3 
1 
17 
104 
5 
I 


3 

2 

17 

114 

4 


1 
2 
2 
28 
115 
6 


1 
3 
2 
33 
118 
3 
1 


2 
5 
6 

44 

144 

5 








1 

12 

1 

60 

105 

1 












6 

11 

55 

160 

4 

1 


9 
9 
66 
159 
3 
1 


10 
10 

63 

128 

I 
I 


11 
10 
42 
57 
3 
3 


10 

9 

18 

43 

2 

I 


11 

4 

104 

88 

1 


























































I 






3 


2 

1 

1 


2 


3 


4 
1 

1 
1 


5 

1 

I 


6 

1 

1 


5 
3 

2 


3 

1 

1 
2 


6 
2 


2 


2 














I 
2 


I 










2 

2 


1 


2 


I 


1 




1 
















1 
1 
1 
9 
4 


























4 


2 


3 


1 


I 


1 

4 
5 


2 
1 
9 
5 






1 












1 




























1 
1 


1 


4 
4 


4 
3 


9 
3 


6 
6 


4 

1 


3 

7 


4 
3 


2 
2 


4 
6 






4 

5 

62 

8 








6 


3 








1 






3 


3 


5 


3 


II 


7 


5 


9 


12 


6 


18 


18 


17 


27 


12 


17 




























1 
























13 
1 


1 

22 

3 
























1 
1 
9 

1 
2 












28 
3 
2 


29 
7 
3 


22 
10 
2 


32 

16 


25 
16 


21 

24 

I 

I 


18 
34 


12 

28 

4 

1 


6 
33 


3 
30 

1 
1 


3 

29 

1 

5 


3 
22 

1 


3 


9 
6 
3 






















I 


1 


3 
I 








2 




I 




1 


















I 
41 
14 

8 


















2 





2 
r 

2 


4 

1 
7 


14 
I 

5 


45 
5 

4 


33 
16 
11 


51 

8 

11 


39 

II 
14 


30 
18 
6 

1 


32 

8 

4 


20 

6 
6 


U 
3 
3 


5 
2 
1 


1 
2 


4 
2 
I 














1 
















I 


2 


I 
5 


1 
2 


I 

I 


2 
3 


1 


I 

1 










1 




I 
I 








1 


2 


1 










1 





















151 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



CITY OF 
Deaths of Females by Age, and Cause of Death, 



Cause of Death 


u 




m 

< 
< 




I 


2 


3 


4 


tn 
u 

Is -3 

e 


5 


VI. Diseases of Genito-Urinary System. 




257 
2,464 


14 
3 


12 
2 


4 

1 


7 
2 


6 

1 


43 
9 


10 

8 










122. Other diseases of the kidneys and appen- 




58 
13 
13 

4 


1 


I 




I 


1 


4 
























1 




































127. Non-venereal diseases of male genital organs 






















2 
95 
23 

8 
20 

105 
2 

ISO 

80 

79 

172 

161 

22 

7 

2 
























































































132. Salpingitis and other diseases of female geni- 


















133. Diseases of breast (not puerperal nor cancer) 
VII. Puerperal Diseases. 




1 










1 
































































































































































3 

20 

6 

3i 

18 

59 
3 
















VIII. Diseases of Skin and Cellular Tissue. 








1 


I 


1 


3 
















12 

8 

10 
1 


1 
1 

4 








13 
9 

21 
2 


2 

7 












IX. Diseases of Locomotory System. 




2 

1 


2 


3 


147. Arthritis, other diseases of joints (except 
















1 

281 

1,763 
409 
134 

1 

345 

39 
99 
11 
5 
12 

5 
25 
















X. Malformations. 




268 

1,760 
407 
132 

1 


8 

3 
2 
2 


3 




1 


280 

1,763 
409 
134 

1 


I 


XI. Diseases of Infancy. 
151. Congenital debility, icterus and sclerema. , , 






























XII. Diseases of Old Age. 












XIII. External Causes. 

















































































































































152 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



NEW YORK 

for the Year Ending December 31, IQ12. — Continued. 



10 


IS 


20 


25 


30 


35 


40 


45 


50 


55 


60 


65 


70 


75 


80 


•a 

£0 


13 

V 

u 


"5 


V 

c 
U 


a 
1 

S 

a 

cS 


8 
6 


5 

7 


14 
34 


22 
70 


13 
79 


21 
116 


19 
170 


16 
223 


19 
238 


18 
259 


15 
299 


14 
313 


7 
256 


7 
194 


2 
123 


4 
60 


19 
79 














1 


S 

1 


5 


3 

I 
3 


3 
2 

1 


8 
1 

1 
2 


S 
3 


5 

1 


6 
1 


3 

I 
I 


2 
2 

1 


2 

1 


5 






1 


4 
1 














2 


2 


1 


1 








































































































1 
17 
S 
2 
7 

14 


1 

27 
2 
2 

1 

8 





























1 


1 


3 
3 

1 
1 

26 


7 
7 
I 
2 

24 
I 

40 
23 
21 
29 
38 
10 
4 


27 

1 

1 
6 


5 
3 

1 
2 

3 


2 


2 


1 
2 


2 








11 




















1 
3 

20 














1 
3 

14 








1 
4 




1 




1 










































4 
2 

1 
12 
14 


29 

10 
16 

47 
38 

4 

1 


41 
20 
13 

53 
46 

1 
I 


28 
21 
20 
21 
21 
6 

1 


8 
2 
6 

10 
4 

1 
1 




















7 
3 
4 
7 
3 
1 
2 






2 
1 




















I 










































































































1 


























































2 


I 








































1 


2 








6 


4 


3 

1 
1 
3 


1 
1 


1 


2 

1 






1 


1 
1 


1 
1 

4 
1 








2 
3 

I 

4 










1 
I 

2 


3 

1 

3 


1 


1 


2 
1 

5 


1 
2 


1 






















4 


3 


1 


1 


1 








1 








































































1 






















































8 

69 
23 

6 






































1 




























































































































1 

3 
9 
2 


8 


29 


45 


62 


79 


121 


8 








2 
5 


6 
11 

1 
1 
2 
1 
3 


9 

14 

2 

I 
2 

7 


6 
8 
1 
2 
3 

3 


S 
9 

1 
1 

1 
2 


4 
14 
2 
1 
2 


2 

11 


2 
6 

1 




2 


6 

1 


3 


1 










































1 


3 






























1 
1 


















2 




3 


3 




1 































153 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



CITY OF 
Deaths of Females by Age, and Cause of Death, 



Cause of death 







so 

< 

< 





1 


2 


3 


4 


c 


5 






4 




































14 

2 

33 

39 

254 
144 

37 
3 








2 




2 
1 
9 

8 

107 

23 

4 


4 

1 
4 
42 
5 
2 
1 






I 

9 

16 

3 


1 
3 
2 
18 
3 








1 

1 

25 

1 
1 


3 
3 

25 
2 


2 

1 

30 

1 














































294 


7 


14 


12 


9 


3 


45 


27 










3 

117 
3 














1 
25 


175. Deaths by other crushing agencies, wagons, 




1 


2 

I 


6 


7 


10 


25 
2 


176. Deaths from injuries inflicted by animals 






































2 

34 


7 


I 








1 
8 












1 




































19 

5 
28 
24 
45 
12 
19 

1 


I 

1 
II 

1 






1 




2 

1 
12 
3 


2 

7 

I 


183. Homicides by cutting or piercing instru- 












I 


1 










1 












4 
4 


I 
I 




1 




6 
5 


I 
I 






XIV. Ill-defined or Not Specified Causes. 
































26 




19 


3 


2 




24 

1,714 


I 
~368 










8,983 


594 


502 


289 


203 


126 










3,5i6 
2,403 


14* 


114 
I 


61 


48 
2 


32 

1 


396 

4 


95 
3 










II. — Diseases of nervous system and organs of 




1,298 
5,875 
5,091 
3,505 
3,064 

676 
75 
63 

281 
2,173 

345 
i,33i 


165 

13 

1,442 

1,622 

19 


74 

715 

298 

15 


29 
10 

244 

79 
5 


14 
11 
79 
33 
10 


22 
11 
62 
15 
8 


304 

52 

2,542 

2,047 

57 


31 
94 
100 
52 
19 


























20 

11 

268 

2,168 


2 

4 
8 
5 


1 
3 
3 


1 
2 


1 
3 
I 


25 

23 

280 

2,173 


2 
7 
1 




























66 


48 


48 


54 


48 


264 


124 










200 

52 

1,079 




















13 
53 


48 


1 
47 


1 
S3 


48 


15 
249 


9 

115 














27 




19 


3 


2 




24 


I 










32,787 


6,388 


1,697 


714 


409 


297 


9,505 


799 









154 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



NEW YORK 

for the Year Ending December 31, 1912. — Continued. 





10 


IS 


20 


25 


30 


35 


40 


45 


50 


55 


60 


65 


70 


75 


80 


13 
C 

00O 


| 

■a 
8 

"3 
O 


V 

w 

C 

IS 
U 


| 

S 
a 

>-> 








I 


2 










1 
















« 












































1 
1 


2 








2 




1 


1 




I 








































3 
3 
8 
9 
6 


1 
3 
6 
8 
2 
2 


4 

2 

10 

5 
4 


10 

19 
8 
6 


2 
3 

9 
II 

1 


1 
1 
5 
7 
3 


2 

2 

7 

16 

1 
















2 
2 
8 
3 








3 

7 

I 


1 
7 
3 
5 


1 
2 

7 

I 


2 
10 
6 


2 

5 

10 


1 
5 
7 
2 


I 

I 
II 












2 
5 


2 
2 












































































2 


4 


6 


12 


13 


13 


14 


16 


19 


16 


11 


20 


26 


22 


16 


12 


6 


















1 
1 
















1 
5 




















S 


4 


2 


1 


7 

1 


7 


7 


4 


5 


7 


7 


3 


I 


I 


2 






























































































I 






























1 
2 








1 




2 






4 


6 


1 


2 


1 


3 


2 


1 


3 






























































I 

I 
2 

I 


4 


5 


1 
1 


1 


3 








1 














1 












1 




















4 


1 

1 

14 


3 


1 










I 


1 

4 














11 
2 

1 


2 
8 
2 
2 


1 
3 




2 


3 


1 


2 


3 


1 
1 
1 
3 








2 


3 


















1 












I 
I 


2 




2 


2 




I 






I 


I 














































































1 


















2 










































190 


372 


577 


603 


600 


6l8 


616 


591 


636 


555 


531 


403 


289 


167 


ill 


42 


380 














97 
4 


290 

11 


468 
15 


468 
36 


430 
82 


393 
136 


276 
235 


190 
289 


142 
359 


105 

321 


69 
313 


51 
232 


26 

179 


14 
95 


3 
65 


3 


230 
61 






















23 
108 
40 

2$ 

IS 

I 

4 


18 

117 

56 

36 

24 

33 

2 

3 


26 

121 

98 

58 

78 

147 

2 

5 


34 

154 

107 

70 

133 

176 

2 

2 


35 

192 

135 

82 

140 

165 

4 

3 


48 
288 
144 
128 
195 
118 
1 
I 


59 
295 
157 

125 

238 

32 

2 

I 


66 

390 

164 

144 

280 

4 

5 

6 


87 

454 

211 

144 

278 

1 

6 

4 


99 
543 
213 
112 
284 


83 
637 
245 
134 
322 


116 
684 
257 
ios 
333 


94 
660 
218 

93 
273 


98 
496 
188 

83 
203 


46 
357 
131 

41 
126 


31 
233 
85 
26 
66 


36 
171 
212 
108 
132 

27 
3 




















2 












1 
2 


1 
1 


6 


4 


8 


2 


1 
1 






















8 
92 

8 
33 








































I 
























1 
51 


8 

43 


29 

57 


45 
56 


62 

47 


79 
27 


121 
23 






24 




87 


89 


79 


95 


78 


67 


73 
















4 
20 




37 

2 

50 


23 

1 

55 


19 

6 

70 


23 

1 
54 


19 

48 


13 

1 
59 


14 

1 

36 


3 


9 


3 

I 

52 


1 

1 

45 














4 
33 


6 
55 






I 
32 








40 


48 


27 


23 














1 












1 




















2 










































431 


708 


1,199 


1.370 


1.435 


C.636 


1,604 


I.7I7 


1,894 


1,861 


2,005 


1.990 


1.732 


1.352 


920 


629 


r,2i2 


3 





155 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Total Deaths by 

BOROUGH OF 





CO 

« 
bo 

< 

< 


U 


I 


2 


3 


4 


10 

g -a 

a 
HO 


5 




20,473 
16,075 


4.233 

3,442 


1,033 
852 


429 
374 


231 
210 


187 
131 


6,113 
5,009 


401 
372 










36,548 


7,675 


1,88s 


803 


441 


318 


11,122 


773 







BOROUGH OF 





3,900 
3.044 


631 
490 


169 
140 


72 
57 


37 
40 


28 
33 


937 
760 


89 




83 








6,944 


1,121 


309 


129 


77 


61 


1,697 









BOROUGH OF 









613 
594 


285 
241 


156 
129 


105 
106 


3,624 
3.058 


289 




11,250 1 1,988 


280 








23.994 


4.453 


1,207 


526 


285 


211 


6,682 









BOROUGH OF 





2,173 
1,805 


430 

354 


9i 
88 


36 
35 


23 

21 


17 
20 


597 
518 






45 






3,978 


784 


179 


71 


44 


37 


I.II5 


99 





BOROUGH OF 





931 
613 


142 
114 


30 
23 


15 
7 


6 
9 


9 

7 


202 
160 














1.544 


256 


53 


22 


15 


16 


362 


41 







40,221 
32,787 


7,901 1,936 
6,388 J 1,697 


837 

714 


453 
409 


346 
297 


H.473 
9.505 


855 
799 








73.008 


14,289 3,633 


I.55I 


862 


643 


20,978 


r,654 



156 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Age-groups, Year 1012. 

MANHATTAN. 

































•O 


— 


D 



9 


10 


15 


20 


25 


30 


35 


40 


4S 


50 


55 


60 


65 


70 


75 


80 


0) > 









a 

m 

*-* 
































wO 


O 


V 


187 


380 


711 


889 


1,042 


1.386 


1.383 


1.369 


1.475 


1,241 


1,202 


1,004 


818 


446 


248 


178 


876 


75 


7 


177 


357 


548 


709 


708 


831 


854 


863 


929 


876 


942 


912 


762 


562 


393 


271 


752 


1 




364 


737 


1.259 


1.598 


1.750 


2,217 


2,237 


2,232 


2,404 


2,117 


2,144 


1. 9 16. 


1,580 


1,008 


641 


449 


1,628 


76 


7 



THE BRONX. 



52 

62 


108 153 
79 159 


231 

170 


226 
162 


283 

147 


327 
141 


259 

148 


248 
163 


213 
173 


227 
211 


199 
173 


152 

154 


104 
134 


53 
85 


39 

40 


81 
87 


1 


2 










114 


187 j 312 


401 


38S 


430 


468 1 407 


411 


386 


438 


372 


306 


238 


138 


79 


168 


1 


2 



BROOKLYN. 



161 

164 


275 
218 


410 
415 


474 
418 


601 
472 


748 
557 


847 
517 


814 
572 


857 
662 


759 
649 


729 
702 


719 
757 


585 
648 


437 
539 


258 

369 


159 
253 


254 
307 


g 
2 


4 

1 


32s 


493 


825 


892 


1,073 


1,305 


1,362 


1.386 


1,519 ' 1,408 

1 


1,431 


1,476 


1.233 976 


627 


412 


56l 


11 


5 


QUEENS. 


27 

22 


45 
46 


79 
57 


91 

54 


92 

71 


116 
76 


141 
78 


151 
99 


155 
106 


126 
127 


113 

118 


120 
99 


105 
115 


73 
83 


52 
50 


36 

41 


54 
56 


1 










49 


91 


136 


145 


163 


192 


219 


250 


261 


253 


231 


219 


220 


156 


102 


77 


no 


1 


.... 


RICHMOND. 


10 


13 
8 


24 
20 


29 
19 


40 
22 


SI 
25 


58 
14 


48 
35 


59 
34 


54 
36 


66 
32 


67 
49 


70 57 
53 1 34 


38 
23 


23 
24 


20 
10 






6 












16 


21 


44 


48 


62 


76 


72 


83 


93 90 


98 


116 


123 


91 


61 


47 


30 










NEW YORK. 


437 
431 


821 
708 


1,377 
1,199 


1,714 
1.370 


2,001 
1.435 


2,584 
I.636 


2,754 
1,604 


2,641 
1. 717 


2,794 2,393 
1,894 1,861 


2,337 |2,I09 
2,005 1,990 


1.730 
1.732 


1,117 
1.352 


649 

920 


435 
629 


1.285 
1,212 


86 
3 


13 

1 


868 


1.529 


2,576 


3.084 


3.436 


4,220 


4.358 


4.358 


4,688 '2,254 


4,342 


4.099 


3.462 


2,469 


r,569 


1,064 


2,497 


89 


14 



157 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths of Immigrants at Ellis Island Hospital, Year IQI2. 



Causes of Death. 


To- 
tal. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


White. 


Col- 
ored. 


Under 
1 Yr. 


i-4 
Yrs. 


S-14 
Yrs. 


15-34 
Yrs. 


33-54 
Yrs. 


55-74 
Yrs. 


75 
and 
Over 




2 


I 


1 


2 










1 


1 






















1 




1 


1 














1 




c 11 


















41 
16 


24 
10 


17 
6 


41 
16 




8 
1 


30 
10 


3 
S 
































S 

s 

20 

9 

18 ■ 


4 
4 

14 
6 

11 


1 
1 


5 
5 






3 
1 
6 

1 
1 


2 










Pneumonia, 91 and 92 

Other acute infectious diseases. . 




2 
6 

1 
4 




1 
2 
1 
3 


1 




1 
1 
2 


5 
5 

8 










7 1 18 1 



















1 58 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



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159 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



I TfOO M 00 in f) 0\ o 
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O O • 0\ ■ 00 tJ- ■ 



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I ro ro O O >-< m M 



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160 



■m c .2? rt 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



1912 



Deaths from All Causes and Diarrhceal Diseases under One Year of Age, by Weeks. 

CITY OF NEW YORK. 



Week Ending. 



All Causes. 



o a 
2P 



52 



Ct3 

2p 



s2 



2 5 



52 



Ct3 
2t= 



■S2 



2t§ 



Diarrhoeal Diseases. 



Ct3 



•d ° 

52 



2t> 



T3 O 
52 



C"0 

S5 



£2 



C T3 

2t> 



■gS 



Ct3 

2P 



January 6. . . 
January 13 . . . 
January 20 . . . 
January 27 . . . 
February 3 . . 
February 10 . . 
February 17 . . 
February 24. . 
March 2 . . . . 
March 9 . . . . 
March 16 ... . 
March 23 ... . 
March 30 ... . 

April 6 

April 13 

April 20 

April 27 

May 4 

May 11 

May 18 

May 25 

June 1 

June 8 

June 15 

June 22 

June 29 

July 6 

July 13 

July 20 

July 27 

August 3 

August 10 ... . 
August 17 ... . 
August 24 ... . 
August 31 ... . 
September 7 . 
September 14. 
September 21 . 
September 28 . 
October 5 . . . 
October 12 . . . 
October 19. . . 
October 26 . . . 
November 2 . 
November 9 . 
November 16 . 
November 23 . 
November 30 . 
December 7 . 
December 14. 
December 2 1 . 
December 28 . 



105 

100 

US 

107 

H7 

112 

ill 

106 

116 

101 

106 

H7 

110 

102 

116 

82 

87 

107 

103 

97 

97 

95 

92 

102 
III 

80 
104 

89 

93 

97 

104 

92 

101 

82 

104 

92 

93 

88 

87 

70 

103 

105 

100 

84 

98 

102 

116 

85 

116 

77 

92 

97 



Total, 52 weeks. . 5,165 



n, 



17 



252 
258 
280 
233 
263 
241 
250 
258 
273 
259 
290 
314 
261 
292 
296 
248 
261 
296 
277 
277 
279 
251 
249 
227 

215 
222 
267 
309 
328 
351 
396 

354 
355 
356 
369 
322 
314 
314 
308 
271 
289 
273 
261 
223 
231 
228 
246 
207 
237 
177 
204 
199 



18 



27 
27 
26 

25 

24 
24 
30 
23 

21 
41 

44 
28 
23 
38 
37 
30 
36 
32 
26 

22 

49 

37 

38 

31 

35 

52 

72 

121 

154 

164 

198 

175 

169 

169 

158 

140 

140 

129 

133 

112 

93 

72 

70 

58 

40 

39 

33 

24 

20 

20 



1,430 1,144 2,539 2,132 1,801 14,211 



378 



421 1,030 



762 



l6l 



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163 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



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VITAL STATISTICS. 



Deaths by Accident and Negligence. 



Borough of 



Man- 
hattan. 



The 
Bronx. 



Brook- 
lyn. 



Queens. 



Rich- 
mond. 



City of 

New 

York. 



Fractures and Contusions: 

Crushed by machinery 

Crushed by elevators 

Crushed by falling bodies 

Crushed by derricks, stones, etc 

Others 

Not specified by coroners 

Falls: 

Down elevator shafts, holds of vessels, 
etc 

Down stairs 

From buildings 

From fire escapes 

From scaffolds, platforms, etc.- 

From windows 

From wagons, cars, etc 

On streets and sidewalks 

Others 

Not specified by coroners 

Street Vehicles: 

Run over by wagons, trucks, etc 

Run over by automobiles 

Others 

Railroads : 

Electric surface 

Steam 

Elevated 

Subways 

Wounds: 

By firearms 

By cutting and piercing instruments . . . 
Burns and Scalds: 

By stoves 

By lamps 

By fluids 

By playing with matches 

By others 

Not specified by coroners 

Conflagrations 

Horses : 

Kicked by 

Injuries by other animals 

Electric current 

Drowning 

Poison : 

By food 

By alcohol 

By bichloride of mercury 

By carbolic acid 

By cocaine 

By opium (morphine) 

By wood alcohol 

By other poisons 

Illuminating gas 

Chloroform 

Coal gas 

Other gas 

Suffocation 

Criminal abortion 

Lightning 

Freezing 

Sunstroke 

Other external violence 

Hydrophobia 

Tetanus 



16 

44 

22 
30 

33 
65 



65 

98 
62 

40 
23 
71 
24 
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33 

109 
120 

15 
55 

10 

6 



46 

3 

60 

II 

28 
6i 
54 

5 
4 
6 

227 

12 
2 

5 
6 

i 
5 
3 

14 



25 
24 



3 
33 

40 



3 
30 



29 
50 



9 
41 
32 

12 

66 

27 

42 
44 



36 



3 
3 

89 
3 

47 

2 

42 
IS 
19 



5 
125 



5 
123 



3 
35 

35 
3 

13 



23 
9 



3 

45 



26 



30 
50 

44 

36 

53 

100 



US 

170 
81 
53 
37 

127 
72 
64 

206 
70 

194 



ill 
56 



10 

100 
6 

121 
41 

109 
83 
77 

14 
6 

17 

453 

21 



13 

I 

7 

4 

23 

312 

5 

3 

36 

34 

45 

3 

12 

82 

90 

5 

25 



169 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Recapitulation. 



Fractures and contusions 

Falls 

Street vehicles 

Railroads 

Wounds 

Horses 

Burns and scalds 

Conflagrations 

Electric current 

Drowning 

Neglect and exposure 

Illuminating gas 

Other gases 

Poison 

Suffocation 

Criminal abortion 

Sunstroke 

Other external violence 

Tetanus 

Hydrophobia 

Total deaths from accidents and negligence. 



Borough of 



Man- 
hattan. 



210 

581 

244 

82 

16 

9 

209 

54 

6 
227 

3 



25 
24 
33 

46 



The 
Bronx. 



32 

39 

5 

3 

54 



3 

30 
4 

IS 
4 
6 



305 



Brook- 
lyn. 



60 

288 

86 

44 

6 

8 

156 

19 

5 
125 

3 
123 

7 
22 

7 
13 
35 
35 
13 

3 



1,058 



Queens. 



44 
33 

24 



31 
3 
3 

45 
3 



238 



Rich- 
mond. 



26 



85 



City of 
New 
York. 



313 
995 

398 

195 
29 
20 

460 
77 
17 

453 
15 

312 

44 
82 
34 
45 
82 
90 
25 
5 



3.691 



170 



VITAL STATISTICS. 






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171 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Report of Births for the Year 

CITY OF 



Month. 



Total. 



White. 



M. 



Colored. 



M. 



Chinese. 



M. 



Native 
Parents. 



M. 



F. 



January . . . 
February., 
March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October. . . 
November, 
December . 

Total. 



H.97S 
11,092 
11.463 
11,056 
10,271 
10,829 
11,930 
11,525 
io,9Si 
11,464 
10,894 
12,205 



135,655 



6,018 
5,492 
5,739 
5,514 
5,246 
5.439 
5,963 
5.817 
5.496 
5,808 
5.524 
6,113 



5.732 
5,409 
5.543 
5.339 
4,808 
5,163 
5,743 
5,491 
5,282 
5,454 
5,189 
5,893 



114 

91 

82 

104 

106 

no 

112 

117 

93 

104 

107 

105 



98 
95 
106 
114 
109 
98 
80 
97 
74 
93 



68,169 



65,046 



1,488 


1,401 


1.349 


1,329 


1,414 


1,386 


1,421 


1,364 


1,418 


1,237 


1,409 


1,328 


1,510 


1,532 


1,490 


1,420 


1,405 


1,394 


x.457 


1,386 


1,386 


1,296 


l,53i 


1,441 



17,278 



16,514 



Report of Births for the Year 
BOROUGH OF 



Month. 



Total. 



White. 



M. 



F. 



Colored. 



M 



Chinese. 



M. 



Native 
Parents. 



M. 



January . . . 
February . . 
March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October. . . 
November 
December. 

Total. 



5.955 
5,593 
5-539 
5,393 
5,097 
5,223 
5,670 
5,787 
5,209 
5,507 
5,254 
6,022 



2,990 
2,767 

2,759 
2,675 
2,545 
2,610 
2,816 
2,828 
2,637 
2,786 
2,607 
3,004 



2,801 
2,684 
2,641 
2,579 
2,391 
2,459 
2,701 
2,809 
2,464 
2,583 
2,519 
2,873 



66 
62 
69 
81 
78 



61 
68 

71 

82 



78 
75 
76 
67 
75 
73 
73 
70 
47 
70 
57 
62 



554 


502 


485 


491 


504 


526 


499 


485 


495 


445 


495 


445 


524 


517 


525 


543 


475 ■ 


478 


489 


481 


484 


491 


586 


517 



66,249 33,024 31,504 



823 



6,115 



5.921 



172 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Ending December 31, 1912. 

NEW YORK. 



Foreign 
Parents. 


Mixed 
Parentage. 


Unknown 
Parentage. 


At- 
tended 
by Phy- 
sician. 


At- 
tended 
by Mid- 
wives. 


Appar- 
ently 

Illegiti- 
mate. 


Twins. 


Triplets. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 




3,888 
3,549 
3.751 
3,462 
3,282 
3,436 
3.787 
3,749 
3,501 
3.731 
3.524 
3.945 


3,7i8 
3,488 
3,548 
3,427 
3.090 
3.308 
3,657 
3,528 
3,292 
3,5n 
3,344 
3.789 


694 
646 
613 
688 
615 
632 
748 
663 
657 
687 
690 
711 


677 
651 

667 
598 
548 
60 r 
649 
593 
639 
623 
586 
731 


62 

41 
44 
49 
38 
74 
30 
34 
26 
38 
31 
31 


47 
39 
40 
47 
43 
41 
17 
48 
37 
31 
37 
26 


7,283 
6,583 
6,686 
6,748 
6,391 
6,843 
7,367 
7,063 
6,728 
6,932 
6,695 
7,593 


4,692 
4.509 
4,777 
4.308 
3.880 
3,986 
4.563 
4,462 
4.223 
4.532 
4.199 
4,612 


211 
180 
164 
201 
18S 
151 
152 
184 
136 
165 
157 
131 


129 
96 
117 
117 
102 
109 
90 
103 
H7 
120 
118 
112 


1 

1 
1 






3 
3 










43,605 


41,700 


8,044 


7,563 


498 


453 


82,912 


52.743 


2,017 


1.330 


9 



Ending December 31, 1912. 

MANHATTAN. 



Foreign 
Parents. 


Mixed 
Parentage. 


Unknown 
Parentage. 


At- 
tended 
by Phy- 
sician. 


At- 
tended 
by Mid- 
wives. 


Appar- 
ently 

Illegiti- 
mate. 


Twins. 


Triplets. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 




2,179 
2,055 
2,030 
1,926 
1,848 
1,891 
2,044 
2,096 
i,94i 
2,055 
1.902 
2,178 


2,067 
1.979 
1,903 
1.893 
1,770 
1,817 
2,013 
2,050 
1.773 
1,926 
1,824 
2,105 


284 
259 
250 
277 
251 
239 
297 
256 
259 
279 
261 
294 


270 
258 
251 
231 
216 
231 
229 
243 
228 
217 
229 
291 


57 
35 
38 
44 
33 
65 
29 
31 
23 
31 
31 
28 


42 
31 
37 
38 
39 
40 
17 
43 
32 
29 
32 
23 


3,729 
3.341 
3.291 
3.324 
3.204 
3.421 
3.492 
3,563 
3.209 
3.373 
3.273 
3.836 


2,226 
2,252 
2,248 
2,069 
1,893 
1,802 
2,178 
2,224 
2,000 
2,134 
1,981 
2,186 


171 
112 
132 
151 
151 
123 
121 
144 

97 
127 
118 

94 


67 
57 
60 
60 
55 
55 
51 
62 
46 
48 
5i 
47 






1 








3 










24.145 


23,120 


3,206 


2,894 


445 


403 


41.056 


25,193 


1. 541 


659 


4 



173 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

Marriages Reported During the Year 

CITY OF 





Total. 


White. 


Black. 


Chinese. Single. 


Widowed. 


Month. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 




4.306 
4.501 
3.436 
3.493 
3,804 
5 447 
3.817 
3,719 
4,089 
4,922 
5,019 
5, ISO 


4,210 
4,404 
3,376 
3.401 
3.707 
5.353 
3.696 
3.597 
3.98s 
4,801 
4.897 
5.030 


4,210 
4.407 
3.376 
3,404 
3,708 
5.353 
3.699 
3.597 
3.989 
4,804 
4,900 
5,035 


95 
97 
60 
92 
97 
94 
121 
122 
102 
121 
121 
118 


95 
94 
60 
89 
96 
94 
118 
122 
100 
118 
119 
115 


1 


1 


3,98o 
4,132 
3,143 
3.196 
3,494 
5,046 
3.487 
3.364 
3.710 
4.513 
4.580 
4,801 


3,988 
4.16s 
3.186 
3,215 
3,517 
5,067 
3,506 
3,387 
3,762 
4,580 
4,606 
4,789 


299 
336 
260 
268 
286 
368 
291 
324 
339 
362 
385 
308 


272 
282 
204 
233 
236 
328 
267 
276 
289 
293 
353 
313 
























July.. 














2 






1 
2 




Total 


5L703 


50,457 


30,482 


1,240 


1,220 


6 


1 


47.446 


47,768 


3,826 


3,346 
1 



Marriages Reported During the Year 

BOROUGH OF 





Total. 


White. | Black. 


Chinese. 


Single. 


Widowed. 


Date. 


M. F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 




2,717 

2,721 

2,246 
2,107 
2,487 
3.208 
2,184 
2,420 

2,396 
3,092 
3,004 
3,198 


2,648 
2,657 
2,207 
2,029 
2,420 
3,143 
2,111 
2,32s 
2,330 
3,003 
2,936 
3,iii 


2,648 
2,660 
2,207 
2,032 
2,421 
3,143 
2,113 
2,325 
2,333 
3,006 
2,940 
3,115 


68 
64 
39 
78 
67 
65 
73 
95 
65 
89 
67 
85 


68 
61 
39 
75 
66 
63 
71 
95 
63 
86 
64 
83 


1 


1 


2,524 
2,500 
2,557 
1,954 
2,298 
2,965 
1,989 
2,218 
2,171 
2,836 
2,747 
2,980 


2,519 
2,511 
2,086 
1,950 
2,308 
2,981 
1,984 
2,201 
2,192 
2,866 
2,737 
2,966 


177 
205 
164 
137 
168 
221 
168 
183 
199 
222 
218 
188 


164 
170 
127 
127 

142 

191 

165 

173 j 

177 

188 

204 

196 
























July 














1 




November 

December 


1 
2 




Total 


31,780 


30,920 


30,943 


855 


836 


5 


1 J 29,239 


29,321 


2,250 


2,024 



174 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Ending December 31, IQI2. 

NEW YORK. 



Divorced. 


Nat 


ive. 


Foreign. 


Religious 


Marriages 




Civil M 


arriages. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


Cath- 
olic. 


Protes- 
tant. 


Jewish. 


Ethical 
Culture. 


Alder- 
manic. 


Judicial. 


27 


46 


1,468 


1,683 


2,838 


2,623 


1,161 


940 


1.496 




698 


11 


33 


54 


1.S63 


1,825 


2,938 


2,676 


1,550 


1,089 


1. 150 


1 


702 


9 


33 


46 


1,038 


1,246 


2,398 


2,190 


638 


770 


1.456 


2 


563 


7 


29 


45 


1.514 


1,625 


1,979 


1,868 


1,235 


1,057 


428 


1 


762 


10 


24 


Si 


1,264 


1,384 


2,540 


2,420 


1,129 


98s 


941 


1 


745 


3 


33 


52 


2,242 


2,449 


3.20S 


2,998 


1,666 


1,554 


1.464 


6 


746 


11 


39 


44 


1,724 


1,904 


2,093 


1,913 


1,283 


1,094 


630 


4 


804 


2 


31 


56 


1,328 


1,508 


2,391 


2,211 


1,068 


895 


96s 


2 


780 


9 


40 


38 


1,696 


1,888 


2,393 


2,201 


1,349 


1,212 


615 


3 


903 


7 


47 


49 


1,831 


2,043 


3,091 


2,879 


1,543 


1,419 


1,113 


2 


837 


8 


54 


60 


1,953 


2,209 


3,066 


2,810 


1,532 


1,399 


1,207 


2 


871 


8 


41 


48 


1,883 


2,121 


3.267 


3,029 


1,460 


1.354 


1.459 


2 


86S 


10 


431 


589 


19,504 


21,885 


32,199 


29,818 


I5,6l4 


13.768 


12,924 


26 


9,276 


95 



Ending December 31, 1912. 

MANHATTAN. 



Divorced. 


Native. 


Foreign. 


Religious Marriages. 


1 

Civil Marriages. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


Cath- 
olic. 


Protes- 
tant. 


Jewish. 


Ethical 
Culture. 


Alder- 
manic. 


Judicial* 


16 
16 

25 

16 
21 
22 
27 
19 
26 
34 
39 
30 


34 
40 
33 
30 
37 
36 
35 
46 
27 
38 
43 
36 


865 

813 

608 

820 

719 

1,116 

848 

765 

855 

1,004 

1,021 

1,002 


973 

953 

725 

852 

781 

1,236 

949 

856 

951 

1,100 

1,161 

1,135 


1.852 
1,908 
1,638 
1,287 
1,768 
2,092 
1.336 
1.655 
i,54i 
2,088 
1.983 
2,196 


1.744 
1,768 
1,521 
1,255 
1,706 
1,972 
1,235 
I.564 
1,445 
1,992 
1,843 
2,063 


622 
769 
347 
719 
618 
873 
651 
624 
692 
816 
760 
778 


495 
5S4 
410 
501 
538 
749 
492 
430 
624 
722 
756 
644 


1,016 
820 

1,023 
287 
693 
99S 
366 
703 
340 
850 
764 

1,063 


1 
2 
1 
1 
5 
4 
2 
3 
2 

2 


580 
574 
463 
596 
635 
S83 
671 
656 
734 
699 
718 
702 


4 
3 
1 
3 
2 
3 

S 
3 
3 
6 
9 


291 


435 


10,436 


11,672 


21,344 


20,108 


8,269 


6,915 


8,920 


23 


7,611 


42 



175 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



City of New York Life Table. 
Based on the Returns of the Federal Census of iqio and Mortality Returns of 

iqoq, igio and ign. 
Males. 







CD 

+3 









CD 


n 



U-i 


•« -t-i 


cS 


oi . 




S-, Vu 


d 


cd 


O 


oj rt 


GO . 


ti CD 





a d 


GO . 


H v 




13 T3 


CD CO 


O <*-! 




*V "3 


CD m 


CJ U-l 


rt <L> 


£ 0. 


GO c3 


CXi— 5 




§ & 


GO cfl 


CXt-J 


<L> J« 


2 


GO O 


*<*.. 


CD J« 


.2 


GO CD 


x ^ 


^h4 


COPh 


O 


Wo 


>H_) 


CGPn 


<>< 


W^ 




100,000 


4,454,976 


44-55 


51 


51,582 


852,268 


16.52 


I 


86,250 


4,368,726 


50.65 


52 


50,316 


801,952 


15-94 


2 


82,680 


4,286,046 


51-84 


53 


49,024 


752,928 


15-36 


3 


81,080 


4,204,966 


51-86 


54 


47,701 


705,227 


14-79 


4 


80,170 


4,124,796 


51-45 


55 


46,281 


658,946 


14.24 


5 


79,540 


4,045,256 


50.86 


56 


44,812 


614,134 


13-70 


6 


79,080 


3,966,176 


50.15 


57 


43,293 


570,841 


I3-I8 


7 


78,6lO 


3,887,566 


49-45 


58 


41,733 


529,108 


12.68 


8 


78,280 


3,809,286 


48.66 


59 


40,120 


488,988 


12. 19 


9 


78,020 


3,731,266 


47.82 


60 


38,467 


450,521 


11 .71 


10 


77,8lO 


3,653,456 


46.95 


61 


36,760 


413,761 


11 .26 


ii 


77,623 


3,575,833 


46.07 


62 


35,022 


378,739 


10.81 


12 


77,448 


3,498,385 


45-17 


63 


33,283 


345,456 


10.38 


13 


77,277 


3,421,108 


44-27 


64 


31,516 


313,940 


9.96 


14 


77,103 


3,344,005 


43-37 


65 


27,944 


284,196 


9-50 


15 


76,912 


3,267,093 


42.48 


66 


27,985 


256,211 


9. 16 


16 


76,685 


3,190,408 


41 .60 


67 


27,192 


230,019 


8.78 


17 


76,424 


3,H3,984 


40.75 


68 


24,432 


205,587 


8.42 


18 


76,128 


3,037,856 


39 90 


69 


22,755 


182,832 


8.04 


19 


75,802 


2,962,054 


39.08 


70 


21,110 


l6l,722 


7.66 


20 


75,455 


2,886,599 


38.26 


7i 


19,456 


142,266 


7-31 


21 


75,098 


2,811,501 


37-44 


72 


17,866 


124,400 


6.96 


22 


74,728 


2,736,773 


36.62 


73 


16,365 


108,035 


6.60 


23 


74,335 


2,662,438 


35-82 


74 


14,888 


93,147 


6.26 


24 


73,9i8 


2,588,520 


35- 02 


75 


13,469 


76,978 


5-92 


25 


73,487 


2,515,033 


34-22 


76 


12,034 


67,644 


5.62 


26 


73,035 


2,441,998 


33-44 


77 


10,685 


56,959 


5-33 


27 


72,565 


2,369,433 


32.65 


78 


9,423 


47,536 


505 


28 


72,078 


2,297,355 


31-87 


79 


8,205 


39,331 


4-79 


29 


71,572 


2,225,783 


31.10 


80 


7,029 


32,302 


4.66 


30 


71,028 


2,154,755 


30.34 


81 


6,018 


26,284 


4-37 


31 


70,450 


2,084,305 


29-59 


82 


5,H9 


21,165 


4.14 


32 


69,832 


2,014,473 


28.85 


83 


4,317 


16,848 


3-90 


33 


69,180 


1,945,293 


28.12 


84 


3,622 


13,266 


3-65 


34 


68,481 


1,876,812 


27.41 


85 


3,031 


IO,I95 


3-36 


35 


67,734 


1,809,078 


26.71 


86 


2,506 


7,689 


3-07 


36 


66,939 


1,742,139 


26.03 


87 


2,025 


5,664 


2.80 


37 


66,124 


1,676,015 


25-35 


88 


1,584 


4,080 


2.58 


38 


65,286 


I,6lO,729 


24.67 


89 


1,204 


2,876 


2-39 


39 


64,414 


1,546,315 


24.01 


90 


889 


1,987 


2.24 


40 


63,521 


1,482,794 


23-34 


9i 


635 


1,352 


2.13 


4i 


62,599 


1,420,195 


22 .69 


92 


443 


909 


2.05 


42 


61,633 


1,358,561 


22 .04 


93 


307 


602 


1 .96 


43 


60,630 


1,297,932 


21 .41 


94 


212 


390 


1.84 


44 


59,598 


I ,238,334 


20.78 


95 


145 


245 


1 .69 


45 


58,549 


1,179,785 


20.15 


96 


98 


147 


1.50 


46 


57,473 


1,122,312 


19-53 


97 


65 


82 


125 


47 


56,366 


1,065,946 


18.91 


98 


42 


40 


0.95 


48 


55,228 


1,010,718 


18.30 


99 


25 


15 


0.596 


49 


54,047 


956,671 


17.70 


100 


15 


OO 


0.000 


50 


52,821 


903,850 


17. 11 











176 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



City of New York Life Table. 

Based upon the Returns of the Federal Census of igio and Mortality Returns of 
190Q, 1910 and 1911. 

Females. 





d 

TJ.2 


u 


.2 




d 
•0.2 









1- +-> 


03 




U-i 


•-. -~j 


cd 


od . 





« cfl 


M . 


t>^2 


O 


a gj 


u . 


■*-> 4) 




r ~ "3 


<1> !A 


o-tl 






<D in 


od 


t-l • 


5 C^ 


1-c Si 


o._] 




§ o- 


u ~ 


s3 




j3 




w"o 


!*3 


2 


W) 

<J|SH 


w^ 




100,000 


4,883,542 


48.8 


51 


59,219 


1,088,898 


18.4 


I 


88,240 


4,795,302 


54-3 


52 


58,163 


1,030,735 


17 


7 


2 


84,954 


4,710,348 


55-4 


53 


57,077 


973,658 


17 





3 


83,550 


4,626,798 


55-4 


54 


55,943 


917,715 


16 


4 


4 


82,600 


4,544,198 


55-0 


55 


54,728 


862,987 


15 


8 


5 


'81,996 


4,462,202 


54-4 


56 


53,376 


809,6ll 


15 


2 


6 


81,532 


4,380,670 


53-7 


57 


51,905 


757,706 


14 


6 


7 


8l,l68 


4,299,502 


52.9 


58 


50,418 


707,288 


14 





8 


80,880 


4,218,622 


52.1 


59 


48,918 


658,370 


13 


4 


9 


80,632 


4,137,990 


5i-3 


60 


47,388 


6lO,982 


12 


9 


10 


80,418 


4,057,572 


50.4 


61 


45,802 


565,180 


12 


3 


n 


80,230 


3,977,342 


49-5 


62 


44,021 


521,159 


II 


8 


12 


80,053 


3,897,289 


48.7 


63 


42,209 


478,950 


II 


3 


13 


79,878 


3,817,411 


47-8 


64 


40,405 


438,545 


10 


8 


14 


79,702 


3,737,709 


46.9 


65 


38,609 


399,936 


10 


3 


15 


79,515 


3,658,194 


46.0 


66 


36,769 


363,167 


9 


8 


16 


79,314 


3,578,880 


45-1 


67 


34,832 


328,335 


9 


4 


17 


79,093 


3,499,787 


44.2 


68 


32,826 


295,509 


9 





18 


78,850 


3,420,937 


43-4 


69 


30,705 


264,804 


8 


6 


19 


78,587 


3,342,350 


42.5 


70 


28,638 


236,166 


8 


2 


20 


78,298 


3,264,052 


41.7 


71 


26,637 


209,529 


7 


8 


21 


77,985 


3,186,067 


40.8 


72 


24,677 


184,852 


7 


5 


22 


77,648 


3,108,419 


40.0 


73 


22,758 


162,094 


7 


1 


23 


77,293 


3,031,126 


39-2 


74 


20,872 


141,222 


6 


7 


24 


76,927 


2,954,199 


38.4 


75 


19,056 


122,166 


6 


4 


25 


76,548 


2,877,651 


37-6 


76 


17,328 


104,838 


6 





26 


76,155 


2,801,496 


36.8 


11 


15,607 


89,231 


5 


7 


27 


75,744 


2,725,752 


36.0 


78 


13,884 


75,347 


5 


4 


28 


75,296 


2,650,456 


35-2 


79 


12,228 


63,119 


5 


1 


29 


74,815 


2,575,641 


34-4 


80 


10,629 


52,490 


4 


9 


30 


74,3io 


2,501,331 


33-6 


81 


9,165 


43,325 


4 


7 


31 


73,788 


2,427,543 


32.9 


82 


7,871 


35,454 


4 


5 


32 


73,252 


2,354,291 


32.1 


83 


6,729 


28,725 


4 


2 


33 


72,705 


2,281,586 


31-4 


84 


5,724 


23,001 


4 





34 


72,147 


2,209,439 


30.6 


85 


4,846 


18,155 


3 


7 


35 


71,587 


2,137,852 


29.8 


86 


4,009 


14,146 


3 


5 


36 


70,993 


2,066,859 


29.1 


87 


3,276 


10,870 


3 


3 


37 


70,351 


1,996,508 


28.4 


88 


2,610 


8,260 


3 


1 


38 


69,695 


1,926,813 


27.6 


89 


2,053 


6,207 


3 





39 


69,032 


1,857,781 


26.9 


90 


1,607 


4,600 


2 


8 


40 


68,369 


1,789,412 


26.2 


91 


1,249 


3,351 


2 


6 


41 


67,685 


1,721,727 


25.4 


92 


959 


2,392 


2 


5 


42 


66,968 


1,654,759 


24.7 


93 


721 


1,671 


2 


3 


43 


66,223 


1,588,536 


24.0 


94 


533 


1,138 


2 


1 


44 


65,453 


1,523,083 


23-3 


95 


389 


749 


1 


9 


45 


64,654 


1,458,429 


22.5 


96 


278 


471 


1 


7 


46 


63,830 


1,394,599 


21.8 


97 


194 


277 


1 


4 


47 


62,983 


i,33i,6i6 


21. 1 


98 


133 


144 


1 


1 


48 


62,099 


1,269,517 


20.4 


99 


89 


55 





6 


49 


61,179 


1,208,338 


19.7 


100 


55 








50 


60,221 


1,148,117 


19. 1 











177 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



American Table of Mortality. 



Age. 


Surviving. 


Expectancy 
of Life. 


Age. 


Surviving. 


Expectancy 
of Life. 


10 


100,000 


48.7 


53 


66,797 


18.8 


ii 


99,251 


48.1 


54 


65,706 


18 


1 


12 


98,505 


47-4 


55 


64,563 


17 


4 


13 


97,762 


46.8 


56 


63,364 


16 


7 


H 


97,022 


46.2 


57 


62,104 


16 





15 


96,285 


45-5 


58 


6o,779 


15 


4 


16 


95,550 


44-9 


59 


59,385 


H 


7 


17 


94,818 


44.2 


60 


57,917 


14 


1 


18 


94,089 


43-5 


61 


56,371 


13 


5 


19 


93,302 


42.9 


62 


54,743 


12 


9 


20 


92,637 


42.2 


63 


53,030 


12 


3 


21 


91,914 


41-5 


64 


51,230 


11 


7 


22 


91,192 


40.9 


65 


49,341 


11 


1 


23 


90,471 


40.2 


66 


47,36i 


10 


5 


24 


89,751 


39-5 


67 


45,29i 


10 





25 


89,032 


38.8 


68 


43,133 


9 


5 


26 


88,314 


38.1 


69 


40,890 


9 





27 


87,596 


37-4 


70 


38,569 


8 


5 


28 


86,878 


36.7 


71 


36,178 


8 





29 


86,160 


36.0 


72 


33,730 


7 


5 


30 


85,441 


35-3 


73 


3L243 


7 


1 


31 


84,721 


34-6 


74 


28,738 


6 


7 


32 


84,000 


33-9 


75 


26,237 


6 


3 


33 


83,277 


33-2 


76 


23,761 


5 


9 


34 


82,551 


32.5 


77 


21,330 


5 


5 


35 


81,822 


31-8 


78 


18,961 


5 


1 


36 


81,090 


3ii 


79 


16,670 


4 


7 


37 


8o,353 


30.3 


80 


14,474 


4 


4 


38 


79,611 


29.6 


81 


12,383 


4 





39 


78,862 


28.9 


82 


10,419 


3 


7 


40 


78,106 


28.2 


83 


8,603 


3 


4 


41 


77,341 


27-5 


84 


6,955 


3 


1 


42 


76,567 


26.7 


85 


5,485 


2 


8 


43 


75,782 


26.0 


86 


4,193 


2 


5 


44 


74,985 


25-3 


87 


3,079 


2 


2 


45 


74,173 


24-5 


88 


2,146 


1 


9 


46 


73,3,45 


23-8 


89 


1,402 


1 


7 


47 


72,497 


23.1 


90 


847 


1 


4 


48 


71,627 


22.4 


91 


462 


1 


2 


49 


70,731 


21.6 


92 


216 


1 





50 


69,804 


20.9 


93 


79 





8 


51 


68,842 


20.2 


94 


21 





6 


52 
1 


67,841 


19-5 


95 


3 


0.5 



178 



VITAL STATISTICS. 

Deaths in Institutions, Year Ending\December ji, IQI2. 
Borough of Manhattan. 



Babies' Hospital 411 

Bellevue Hospital 3.185 

Beth Israel Hospital 203 

City Hospital 448 

Columbus Hospital 58 

Flower Hospital 260 

Foundling Hospital 1.053 

French Hospital 102 

German Hospital 272 

Gouverneur Hospital 405 

Hahnemann Hospital 71 

Hah Moriah Hospital 45 

Harlem Hospital 789 

Home for Aged (Little Sisters of Poor) 118 

House of Relief 210 

J. Hood Wright Hospital 170 

Lying-in Hospital 215 

Manhattan State Hospital 542 

Metropolitan Hospital 1,683 

Misericordia Hospital 192 

Montefiore Hospital 92 

Mount Sinai Hospital 714 

New York City Home and Hospital 685 

New York Hospital 450 



New York City School and Hospital 137 

New York Nursery and Child's Hospital 143 

Nursery and Childs' Hospital 1 1 

New York Polyclinic Hospital 117 

Post-Graduate Hospital 416 

Presbyterian Hospital 344 

Reception Hospital 95 

Red Cross Hospital 50 

Roosevelt Hospital 274 

St. Francis Home 55 

St. Gregory's Hospital 54 

St. Luke's Hospital 401 

St. Mark's Hospital 44 

St. Mary's Hospital 66 

St. Vincent's Hospital 418 

Skin and Cancer Hospital 54 

Sloane Hospital for Women 89 

Sydenham Hospital 92 

Washington Heights Hospital 60 

Willard Parker Hospital 382 

Workhouse Hospital 54 

Other institutions 1,272 

Total 17,091 



Borough of The Bronx. 



Lebanon Hospital 288 

Lincoln Hospital 303 

Riverside Hospital 332 

St. Francis Hospital 258 

St. Joseph's Hospital 638 

Fordham Hospital 47S 



Home for Incurables 99 

Seton Hospital 334 

Other institutions 142 

Total 2,872 



Borough of Brooklyn. 



Angel Guardian Home 45 | 

Bethany Deaconess Hospital 31 

Brooklyn Hospital 270 

Bushwick Hospital 79 

Consumptive Home 91 

Cumberland Street Hospital 201 

Coney Island Hospital 170 

Eastern District Hospital 90 

German Evangelical Hospital 45 

German Hospital 266 

Home for Aged (Little Sisters of Poor) 74 

Infants' Hospital 35 

Jewish Hospital 308 

King's County Hospital 1,430 

Kingston Avenue Hospital 308 

Long Island College Hospital 277 



Long Island State Hospital 184 

Lutheran Hospital 40 

Methodist Episcopal Hospital 287 

New York City Home for Aged and Infirm. . . 314 

Norwegian Hospital 150 

Samaritan Hospital 38- 

St. Catharine's Hospital 277 

St. Christopher's Hospital 84 

St. John's Hospital 125 

St. Mary's Hospital 312 

St. Peter's Hospital 524 

Swedish Hospital 69 

Williamsburg Hospital 182 

Other institutions 564 

Total 6,87a 



Borough of Queens. 



Flushing Hospital 131 

Jamaica Hospital 67 

St. John's Hospital 207 

St. Joseph's Hospital 77 



St. Mary's Hospital 121 

Other institutions 81 

Total 684 



Borough of Richmond. 



City Farm Colony 112 

Marine Hospital 35 

S. R. Smith's Infirmary 199 

Sailor's Snug Harbor 82 



St. Vincent's Hospital 16S 

Other institutions 61 

Total 65 7 



Recapitulations. 



Borough of Manhattan 17,091 

Borough of The Bronx 2,872 

Borough of Brooklyn 6,870 



Borough of Queens 684 

Borough of Richmond 657 

City of New York 28,174 



179 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Disposition of the Dead and all Still-bom Infants of The City of New York. 



Cemeteries. 



Number of Interments. 

Borough of Manhattan — 

First Presbyterian 

Grace Church Vault 

Marble 

St. Patrick's Cathedral Vault 

Trinity 

Total 



Borough of The Bronx — 

City 5.841 

Pelham Bay 9 

St. Peter's 16 

St. Raymond's 2,671 

Woodlawn 2.174 

Total 10,711 



Borough of Brooklyn — 

Canarsie 65 

Countv Farm 1,497 

Cypress Hills 630 

Evergreen 9 T 7 

Flatlands 7 

Friends x 5 

Gravesend 23 

Greenwood 3 .543 

Holy Cross 5.862 

Holy Trinity 1,848 

Maimonides 92 

Mount Hope H5 

National 133 

New Lotts 4 

New Utrecht 6 

Salem Fields 161 

United Jewish Congregation 53 

Washington 2,330 

Total 17,301 



Borough of Queens — 

Acacia 244 

Beth-El 139 

Bayside 311 

Calvary 19,138 

Cedar Grove 435 

Cypress Hills 1.120 

Evergreen 3.093 

Flushing 297 

Grace Church 10 

Linden Hill 1,753 

Lutheran 5.128 

Machpelah 151 

Maple Grove 309 

Montefiore 984 

Mount Carmel 578 

Mount Hebron 495 



Cemeteries. 



Number of Interments. 

Borough of Queens — Continued 

Mount Judah 43 

Mount Nebo 217 

Mount Olivet 2,022 

Mount St. Mary's 297 

Mount Zion 3,195 

Prospect 40 

Springfield 30 

St. George's 3 

St. John's 2,160 

St. Mary's II 

St. Michael's 2,469 

St. Monica's 73 

Union Fields 436 

United States Crematory 818 

Total 45.999 



Borough of Richmond — 

A. M. E. Zion 8 

Baron Hirsch 702 

Bethel 46 

City Farm Colony 184 

Fairview 94 

Fountain 12 

Hillside 13 

Lake 60 

Moravian 345 

Mount Loretto 5 

New Springville 16 

Mount Richmond 1,191 

Reformed Churchyard 2 

Sailors' Snug Harbor 62 

Sandy Hill St. Andrew's 6 

St. John's Lutheran 5 

St. Joseph's 23 

St. Luke's 6 

St. Mary's, Third Ward 60 

St. Mary's, Fourth Ward 106 

St. Michael's I 

St. Peter's 211 

Silver Lake 25 

Silver Mount 71 

Staten Island 16 

Sylvan 7 

United Hebrew 330 

West Baptist 7 

Woodland ISS 

Woodrow's Church 3 

Total 3.772 



Summary — 

Borough of Manhattan 27 

Borough of The Bronx 10,711 

Borough of Brooklyn 17.301 

Borough of Queens 45.999 

Borough of Richmond 3.772 



180 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Deaths of Persons ioo Years of Age and Over. 



Date 
of 

Death. 



Name. 



Age. 



Nativity. 



Cause of 
Death. 



Borough of 



a 



IOI2 

Jan. 30 
Feb. 20 
Mar. 
Mar. 
July 
July 
Oct. 
Oct. 14 
Dec. 25 



Caranbo Asposito. 
Jane E. Fraser. . 
Eliza Redmond.. 
Mary E. Jones . . 
Henrietta Wilson 
Coleman Stewart 
Mary Carter. . . . 
Maria De Filippas 
Ellen Horgan . 



104 
100 
102 
103 
108 
101 
no 
103 
104 



Italy 

United States. 

Ireland 

Wales 

United States. 
United States. 
United States. 

Italy 

Ireland 



Heart disease . 

Senility 

Senility 

Heart disease . 

Senility 

Rheumatism. . 
Endocarditis. . 
Ac. Bronchitis . 

Old age 

Total . . 



I8l 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



U. S. Department of Agriculture Weather Bureau. 
New York, N. Y. 

ANNUAL METEOROLOGICAL SUMMARY 
1912 

With Comparative Data. 



Annual Summary. 

January and February, with a total of 17 hours with temperatures of zero or lower 
were unusually cold. In the last 18 years this record has been exceeded only by 1904 
with 18 hours in January, and by 1899 with 22 hours in February. Temperature de- 
partures were small from March to September, but October, November and December 
were sufficiently warm to compensate for January and February, so that at the close of 
the year there was a slight accumulated excess in temperature. The annual range was 
96 , from — 3°, January 13, to 93°, July 8. There were no long periods of extremely hot 
weather such as occurred in the summer of 191 1. 

Precipitation was deficient, except in March, April, May, October and December. 
The total, 38.50 inches is 6.26 below normal. This is the fifth consecutive year with de- 
ficient precipitation, the accumulated deficiency for this period being 22.75 inches. Rainy 
days, totaling 119 are 9 less than normal, but days with one inch or more of rain, totaling 
11, are exactly normal. There were three periods of 15 days each without measurable 
precipitation. 

The average hourly wind movement, 17.7 miles, seems extraordinary when compared 
with the normal, 11.5, but this difference is probably almost entirely due to a change in 
the elevation and exposure of the anemometer on May 1, 191 1, from 350 feet at 100 
Broadway to 454 feet at 17 Battery Place. 

Records were broken, February 22 for highest wind velocity at this station, April 23 
for highest wind velocity in April, and September 30 for lowest temperature in September. 

Weather by Months. 

January — -Extreme temperature fluctuations and cold weather were features of the 
month in striking contrast with the unusually mild December preceding. The first cold 
wave, 5th — 6th was moderate. The second, from a temperature of 46 at midnight of 
the 8th, reached a minimum of — 3 at 6:30 a. m. of the 13th, the first zero weather since 
January 24, 1907. In the third cold wave the temperature fell from 38 at 2 p. m. of the 
15th to i° at 9 a. m. of the 16th; and in the fourth, from 52 at 10 a. m. of the 19th to 15 
at 7 a. m. next day. The mean temperature, 23.5° is 6.7 below normal and is the lowest 
January mean since 1893. The period, 5th — -17th with a mean of 16. 6° is the coldest 
13-day period in the last 42 years, except January 10th — 22nd, 1893 with a mean of 14. 5°. 
By the 13th the Hudson River was frozen over solid at Yonkers — -said to be the first time 
since 1893. Precipitation occurred on 15 days, three more than the average, but the 
total, 1.86 inches, is less than half the normal amount. There was snow on the ground 
during 19 days, the heaviest fall, 3.0 inches, occurring on the 12th. 

182 



VITAL STATISTICS. 

February — Was continuously and at times severely cold from the 3rd to 14th. In 
the only well defined cold wave, the temperature fell from 25 at 1 p. m. of the 9th to — 2 
at 7 a. m. of the 10th. The period, 16th — 26th was generally warm for the season. The 
mean 28. 4 is 2.3 below normal. Precipitation was deficient. The 15 days, 5th — 19th, 
were without measurable amount. The only measurable snowfall was 1.8 inches on the 
4th. The ground was practically bare of snow after the 7th. An unprecedented wind- 
storm occurred on the 21st — 23rd. On the 22nd the average hourly movement was 58 
miles. For 5 minutes ending 1:13 a. m. of the 22nd, the average was 96 miles per hour, 
the highest of record, and two miles were recorded at the rate of 120 miles per hour. The 
damage from this storm to shipping in the harbor was considerable. 

March — Opened cold with temperatures constantly below freezing till the 7th. The 
periods, 12th — 20th and 27th — 31st were notably warm. Between was a well defined 
cold wave, the temperature falling from 54 at 9 a. m. of the 20th to 22 at midnight of the 
21st. The monthly mean, 36. 8° is 0.7 below normal. Measurable percipitation occurred 
on 16 days, the total, 5.68 inches, being 1.58 above normal. The 20th-25th, 6 days, is the 
longest period during the year with precipitation on consecutive days. Heavy rains on the 
1 2th, 13th, 24th and 29th, on frozen ground, resulted in unusually heavy run-off, filling 
storage reservoirs and causing considerable damage from surface erosion. Snow fell on 
the 5th, 6th and 12th, and snow and sleet on the 21st and 23rd. The ground was snow 
covered only on the 5th, 6th and 21st. Windstorms of importance occurred on the 12th — 
13th, 15th — 16th and 29th. The highest velocity was 78 miles from the southwest on 
the 15th. 

April — -Showery weather was the rule — 16 days, five more than normal, being "rainy, " 
but the total precipitation, 3.61 inches, is only 0.31 above normal. Much of this rain 
occurred at night. Thunderstorms occurred on the 2nd, iSth, 19th, 23rd and 27th. A 
warm wave, 5th — 7th, reached its high point, 74 at 4 p. m. of the 6th. It was followed by 
a drop from 70 at 1 p. m. of the 7th, to 30 on the morning of the 8th. Another warm 
spell, 15th — 1 6th, was followed by much colder on the 17th. The month closed cold. The 
mean, 49.0 is 0.9 above normal. Important windstorms occurred on the 3rd, 7th — 9th, 
23rd — 24th and 27th — 28th. That of the 23rd was severe. The maximum velocity in 
this storm and for the month was 84 miles from the northwest at 9:25 a. m., the highest 
of record for April. 

May — Mild temperatures with ample and well distributed showers occurring mainly 
at night, made May nearly an ideal month. The mean temperature, 60. 7 is 1.4 above 
normal. A warm period, 19th — 21st, culminated in a temperature of 84 , the highest of 
the month, at 3 p. m. on the 21st. The total precipitation, 3.94 inches, is 0.76 above 
normal. During the rainy period, 5th — -9th, 1.86 inches fell in 24 hours on the 7th — 8th. 

June — Precipitation was deficient, the total for the month, 1.17 inches, being practically 
one-third of the normal. Excepting a shower of 0.16 on the 25th there was no measurable 
rainfall after the 17th. By the close of the month, vegetation was suffering and short pas- 
tures resulted in a great decrease in the milk supply for the city. Warm periods are shown, 
1st — 4th and 2 1st — 26th, with a single hot day — the 29th on which the temperature reached 
93°, the highest of the month. The periods, 5th — 10th and 14th — 15th were cool. The 
mean temperature was nearly normal. Sunshine was much above normal, there being nine 
days with 100 per cent. 

July — The first 10 days were without measurable precipitation. Frequent showers 
during the next 10 days and a heavy rain, 1.91 inches, on the 21st, relieved the drought 
considerably. Of this rain on the 21st, 1.85 inches fell in two hours. This is one of the 
most intense rainfalls on record for this station. (See table, page 12.) The 3rd — 12th and 
14th — 17th were generally warm with temperatures above 90 on the 8th, 9th, 10th and 

£3 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

16th. The rest of the month was cool. The mean, 74.0 is only 0.5 above normal. The 
per cent, of sunshine was 76, there being 8 days with 100 per cent. 

August — Cool weather prevailed the first 10 days; then moderately warm, nth — 
15th; cool 16th — 17th; warm 18th — 22nd and 25th — 26th; and cool 27th — 31st. The 
mean, 70.7 is 1.5 below normal. Showers were well distributed and more frequent than 
normal, but generally light; the total amount, 2.77 inches, being but 61 per cent, of the 
normal. Heavy showers on the 19th totaled 1.17 inches. Thunderstorms occurred on 
8 days, three more than the normal for August. 

September — Opened cool but the temperature rose gradually to the maximum for the 
month, 88° on the nth. The weather turned much cooler on the 12th, but returned to 
normal on the 14th. After the 20th it was continuously cool, and the minimum, 39 on 
the 30th, established a new low record for September. The mean, 65. 9 is 0.6° below normal. 
The 17 cloudy days equal the record for cloudy days in September. Sunshine was corre- 
spondingly deficient. Precipitation was well distributed, and practically normal in fre- 
quency and amount. 

October — From September 26th to October 10th, 15 days, no measurable rainfall occurred. 
Moderate rain on the nth was followed by another period of 10 days without measurable 
precipitation. On the 23rd — 24th, 3.77 inches occurred within 24 hours, 2.26 of which 
fell in two hours. (See table, page 12.) The total for the month, 4.32, is 0.61 above nor- 
mal. The month was generally warm, averaging 58. 5 — 2.9 above normal, with cool 
periods, 1st — 3rd, 8th — 9th, 15th — 17th, and 24th — 25th. The highest, 79 on the 7th, 
and lowest, 40 on the 16th, are well within the extremes for October. Sunshine, 70 per 
cent, of the possible, is 12 per cent, above normal; 12 days show 100 per cent, sunshine. 
The maximum wind velocity of 60 miles from the northwest occurred on the 15th. 

November — Warm waves on the 6th — 7th, nth — 13th and 21st — 22nd, with moderately 
cool periods between, were features of the month. The mean, 46. 6° is 2.6° above normal. 
Precipitation was deficient in both frequency and amount. A moderately heavy rain, 
1.09 inches, occurred on the 7th. The first appreciable snowfall of autumn, 0.8 inch, oc- 
curred on Thanksgiving day, the 28th, and disappeared the following day. The 24th — 
25th were windy with a maximum of 60 miles, the highest of the month, on the 25th. Total 
possible sunshine occurred on 9 days. 

December — Excepting the periods, 8th — 9th, nth — 13th and 23rd — 25th, mild tem- 
peratures prevailed. The mean, 38. 5 , has been exceeded but four times in 42 years. The 
lowest, 1 7 on the 9th, is a high minimum for December. The mean humidity, 67 per cent., 
is the lowest of record. The only measurable snow occurred on the 24th. From 2 a. m. 
to n a. m. the rate of fall was more than an inch per hour. The total, 11.8 inches, is ex- 
ceeded in December only by the 14-inch fall of 26th — 27th, 1890. It melted rapidly and 
disappeared with a heavy, warm rain on the 30th. The period, 7th — 16th was without 
appreciable precipitation. A severe windstorm occurred 27th — 28th, — highest velocity 
72 miles northwest. 

Miscellaneous Data for 1912. 

Barometric Pressure (reduced to sea-level) — Mean, 30.02 inches; highest, 30.65 inches, 
March 3rd; lowest, 29.23 inches, April 2nd. 

Temperature — Greatest daily range, 36 degrees, January 9th; least daily range 5 de- 
grees, May 7th. 

Greatest monthly range, 60 degrees, February; least monthly range, 35 degrees, July. 

Highest mean temperature of three consecutive days, 83 degrees, July 8th to 10th; 
lowest mean temperature of three consecutive days, io*degrees, February 10th to 12th. 

184 



VITAL STATISTICS. 

Precipitation — Longest period without a measurable amount of precipitation (.01 in. 
or more), 15 days, February 5th to 19th, June 26th to July 10th and September 26th to 
October 10th, inclusive. 

Greatest number of consecutive days with precipitation (.or in. or more) 6 days, 
March 20th to 25th, inclusive. 

Snow — Greatest snowfall in 24 hours, 1 1.5 inches, December 24th. 
Greatest depth of snow on the ground, measured at 8 p. m., 1 1.0 inches, December 24th. 
Last snow in spring occurred on April 29th; first snow in autumn occurred on Novem- 
ber 24th. 

Frost — In Spring: last killing frost occurred on April 9th. No frost recorded subsequent 
to last killing. 

In Autumn: first killing frost occurred on November 3rd, and no frost occurred before 
first killing. 

Thunderstorms — First, February 26th; last, November 24th. 

Hail — May 9th. 



185 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



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187 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

Summaries for the Years 1790 to 1912, Inclusive. 

The following tables have been compiled from the records of the Health Departments 
of New York and Brooklyn before consolidation into the present City of New York. The 
New York tables, therefore, present the statistics of the present boroughs of Manhattan 
and The Bronx, and the Brooklyn tables those of the present Borough of Brooklyn. It 
has been found impossible to prepare similar tables for the boroughs of Queens and Rich- 
mond: 

Former New York (Boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx). 

Estimated Population, Deaths, Births and Marriages, from 1790 to 1912, Inclusive. 



Year. 



1790. 
1791. 
1792. 
1793. 
I794- 
1795. 
1796. 
1797. 
1798. 
1799. 
1800. 
1801. 
1802. 
1803. 
1804. 
1805. 
1806. 
1807. 
1808. 
1809. 
1810. 
1S11 . 

1812. 
1813. 
1814. 



32,962 
35.009 
37.182 
39,491 
4L943 
44.548 
47.314 
50,252 
53.372 
56,686 
60,206 
63,081 
66,094 
69,250 
72,557 
76,022 
79.653 
83.456 
87.442 
91,618 
95.993 
95,957 
95,920 
95,884 
95.848 



2,084 
2,297 
2,174 
2,236 
1.950 
2,038 
2.073 
2.431 
2,503 
2,335 
1.844 



Year. 



1815 
1816 
1817 
1818 
1819 
1820 
1821 
1822 
1823 
1824 
1825 
1826 
1827 
1828 
1829 
1830 
1831 
1832 
1833 
1834 
1835 
1836 
1837 
1838, 
1839. 



99,952 
104,232 
108,69s 
113,350 
118,204 
123,266 
130,840 
138,879 
147,413 
156,471 
166,086 
172,978 
180,157 
187,634 
I9S.42I 
203,532 
215,381 
227,920 
241,188 
255,230 
270,089 
278,275 
286,719 
295,400 
304.353 



2,511 
3,000 
2,409 
3.106 
3,178 
3.522 
3,422 
3,212 
3,551 
4.224 
4,920 
4.961 
5.139 
4.843 
4.734 
5.522 
6,347 
10,257 
5,689 
8,937 
7,096 
8.068 
8,626 
7,911 
7,910 



X Incomplete. 



188 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Year. 



1840. . 

1841 . . 

1842. . 

1843. • 

1844. • 
184S • • 
1846. . 
1847*. 

1848. . 

1849. . 

1850. . 

1851. • 

1852. . 
I853t- 
I8S4. • 
I8S5-. 
1856.. 
1857.. 
1858.. 
1859. 
i860. , 
1861.. 
1862. 
1863. 
1864. 
1865. 
1866. 
1867. 
1868. 
1869. 
1870. 
1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874. 
187S. 
1876. 



313,578 
324.342 
33S.47S 
346.991 
358,902 
371,223 
396,686 
423,896 
452,972 
484.043 
517,246 
538,490 
560,607 
583,632 
607,603 
652,559 
664,980 
699,062 
734.892 
772,558 
812,154 
794.905 
778,023 
761,500 
745,327 
729,498 
767,979 
808,489 
851.137 
896,034 
943.300 
955,921 
968,710 
981,671 
1,030,607 
1,044.396 
1.075,532 



8,469 
9.093 
9,154 
8,659 
8,890 
10,122 
11,411 
14,844 
14,892 
22,605 
15,826 
20,738 
20,196 
21,979 
28,473 
24,448 
21,748 
22,811 
23,269 
22,745 
24,760 
24.525 
23.150 
26,617 
25,792 
25,767 
26,815 
23.159 
24,889 
25.167 
27,175 
26,976 
32,647 
29,084 
28,727 
30.709 
29.152 



317 
170 



10.157 

17,979 

14,145 

16,199 

18,427 

13,340 

9,035 

12,454 

10,004 

7,612 

6,426 

5.877 

5,332 

10,006 

12,535 

12,590 

13.947 

14,524 

20,821 

22,068 

22,683 

25,747 

23,813 

23,744 



185 
199 



3,203 
5,595 
4.199 
3,633 
3.710 
3.942 
3,100 
4,241 
2,993 
2,896 
3,272 
2,675 
2.733 
5.792 
7,144 
6,926 
8,695 
7.985 
8,646 
9,008 
8,871 
8.397 
7.56s 
7.099 



Year. 



1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 



1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899 ■ 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1 90s. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
ion. 
1912. 



1,107.597 

1,140,617 

1,174,621 

1,209,196 

1,244,511 

1,280,857 

1,318,264 

1,356,764 

1,396,388 

1,437,170 

L479.I43 

1,522,341 

1,566,801 

1,612,559 

1.659.654 

1,708,124 

1,758,010 

1,809,353 

1,873,201 

1,906,139 

1,940,553 

1,976,572 

2,014,330 

2,055,714 

2,118,209 

2,182,836 

2,249,680 

2,318,831 

2,390,041 

2,460,456 

2,534.454 

2,612,322 

2,694.373 

2,780,950 

2,872,428 

2,969,220 



26,203 
27,008 
28,342 
31.937 
38,624 
37.924 
34.011 
35.034 
35.682 
37.351 
38,933 
40,175 
39,679 
40,103 
43.659 
44.329 
44,486 
4LI75 
43.420 
41,622 
38,877 
40,438 
39,911 
43,227 
43,304 
41,704 
4L776 
48,743 
45.199 
46,108 
47.698 
44,061 
44.387 
45.628 
45,324 
43.492 



25.S69 
25.729 
25.573 
27.536 
26,130 
27.321 
28,972 
30,527 
30,030 
3L3I9 
34.023 
36,136 
37.527 
39,250 
46,904 
49,447 
51,529 
55.636 
53.731 
55.623 
54.089 
53-359 
52.068 
54.6i6 
54,013 
57,511 
62,131 
65,229 
66,862 
70,311 
74,260 
76,480 
73.173 
77.262 
78,991 
79.925 



7,129 
7.629 
8,446 
9,002 
10,077 
11,085 
11.556 
11,805 
11,716 
12,216 
13.740 
14.533 
14,400 
14.992 
15.764 
16,001 
16,144 
17,388 
20,612 
20,513 
20,365 
20,769 
21,740 
22,927 
23,962 
25.993 
27.265 
27.965 
30,228 
34.369 
36,097 
25.583 
28,459 
31. 191 
32,701 
34.603 



* First year of registration of births and marriages, 
t Births and marriages from July 1 to December 2. 
i Incomplete. 



189 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

The following tables present statistics relating to the present City of New York, 
limits of that city, so far as the same can be ascertained, together with the development 



Population of the Former City of 

Boroughs of Manhattan 



Ward. 



o T5 

<u O 



From What 
Taken. 



1830. 



183S. 



1840. 



184S. 



1850. 



1st. 

2d.. 

3d.. 

4th. 

5th. 

6th. 

7th. 

8th. 

9th. 
10th. 
nth. 
12th. 
13th. 

14th. 
15th. 

1 6th. 

17th. 

1 8th. 

19th. 

20th. 

2 ISt. 

22d. . 



23d 

24 th 

Total . 



1791 
1791 
1791 
1791 
1791 
1791 
1791 
1803 
1803 
1808 

1825 
1825 

1827 

1827 
1832 

1836 
1837 
1846 
1850 
1851 
1853 
I8S3 

1874 

1874 
and 
1895 



4.320 
5.167 
6,449 
6.935 
9,148 
13.076 
15.394 



7 th Ward. 
7th Ward. 
7th Ward. 



/ 9th and 10th 

1 Wards 

J 9th and 10th 

1 Wards 

10th Ward.. . . 



/ 6th and 8th 

1 Wards 

9th Ward 



1 2th Ward, 
nth Ward. 
1 6th Ward. 
12th Ward. 
16th Ward. 
18th Ward. 
19th Ward. 



/ Westchester 
\ County.. . . 

Westchester 
County . . . 



7,941 
8,493 
7,426 
10,226 
14,744 
11,286 
12,120 
9,128 
4.719 
10,290 



7,630 
7,439 
7,495 
9,856 
14.S23 
11,821 
10,886 
10,702 
4,343 
10,824 



12,085 
8,214 
9,201 
10,736 
12,421 
13,309 
13,006 
13,766 
11,162 
17,806 



9,929 
9,315 
10,801 
12,240 
15,093 
20,061 
14,192 
24,285 
10,956 
23,932 

7,344 
7,938 



60,489 96,373 



123,706 



n,33l 
8,203 
9,599 
12,705 
17,722 
13.570 
15.873 
20,729 
17,333 
16,438 

14,915 
11,808 
12,598 

14,288 



10,380 
7,549 
10,844 
15,439 
18,495 
14,827 
21,481 
28,570 
20,618 
20,926 

26,845 

24,437 

17,130 

17,306 
13,202 



10,629 
6,394 
11,581 
15,770 
19,159 
17,198 
22,982 
29,073 
24,795, 
29,026 

17,053 
11,652 
18,517 

20,235 
17,755 
22,723 
18,619 



268,089 



12,230 
6,962 
11,900 
21,000 
20,362 
19,343 
25,556 
30,900 
30,9071 
20,993 

27,259 

13,378 
22,411 

21,103 
19,422 

40,350 

27,147 



19,754 
6,665 
10,355 
23,250 
22,686 
24.698 
32,690 
34,6i2 
40,657 
23,316 

43.758 

10,451 
28,246 

i 
25,i96j 

22,564 
52,882 
43.766 
31.546 

18,465 



4.436 



519.983 



Note. — In this and the four following tables, the columns headed by decade years give the results of the 
The figures, for years prior to 1870, for this and the following tables, are taken from the official report of 

as given in the reports of the United States census for those years. The actual figures of the columns, however. 
The city was originally divided into seven wards in 1686, by Governor Dongan's charter. They were 

Manhattan Island forming the Out Ward. 

* The New York State census of New York City (Boroughs of Manhattan and The Bronx) was not taken 
N. B. — The Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Wards constitute the present Borough of the Bronx. They 

cannot be given previous to the census of 1875, the population as given in the table for previous years, being the 

separated from Westchester County as a whole, and formed into the towns of West Farms (1846) and Morrisania 
A On June 6, 189s, a portion of Westchester County, comprising a part of the present Twenty-fourih Ward, 

States census, was 25,085. 



190 



VITAL STATISTICS. 

showing the growth of population since 1800 in the territory now comprised within the 
and successive segregation of the smaller civil divisions thereof: 



New York, by Census, Since 1800. 
and the Bronx. 



1855. 



13,846 
3,249 
7,909 
22,89s 
21,617 
25,562 
34,422 
34,052 
39,982 
26,378 
52,979 
17.656 
26,597 
24.754 
24,046 
39,823 
59,548 
39.41s 
17,866 
47,055 
27.914 
22,605 

12,436 



i860. 



18,148 
2,506 
3,757 
21,99-1 
22,337 
26,696 
39,982 
39,406 
44.385 
29,004 
59,571 
30.651 
32.917 
28,080 
27,587 
45,176 
72,953 
57,462 
32,795 
67,519 
49,017 
61,725 

16,343 



1870. 



9,852 
1,194 
3.367 
17,352 
18,205 
19,754 
36,962 
30,098 
38,504 
31,537 
58,953 
28,259 
26,388 
23,382 
25,572 
41,972 
79,563 
47,613 
39,945 
61,884 
38,669 
47.361 



14.463 
1.312 
3.715 
23.748 
17,150 
21,123 
44,81 
34.913 
47,609 
41.431 
64.230 

47.497 
33,364 
26,436 
27,587 
48,359 
95,365 
59,593 
86,090 
75,407 
56,703 
7L349 

28,981 



1875. 



14,298 
1,012 
2,874 
20,828 
I5,95i 
19,861 
45,636 
32,465 
49,403 
4L757 
63.855 
60,510 
34.013 
26,453 
25.529 
48,235 
101,075 
6i,i95 
118,727 
79,764 
58,831 
83,420 

1 24,320 
( 11,874 



17,939 
1,608 
3,582 
20,996 
15.845 
20,196 
50,066 
35.879 
54.596 
47.554 
68,778 
81,800 
37.797 
30,171 
31,882 
52,188 

104,837 
66,611 

158,191 
86,015 
66,536 

111,606 

28,338 

13,2 



United 

States 

Census, 

1890. 



Police 

Census, 

1890. 



11,122 
929 
3,765 
17,809 
12,385 
23,119 
57,366 
31,220 
54.425 
57,596 
75,426 

245,046 
45,884 
28,094 
25,399 
49.134 

103,158 
63,270 

234,846 
84.327 
63.019 

153.877 

53.948 
20,137 



12,075 
i.Sio 
3,4i8 
19,337 
12,949 
23,058 
62,139 
41,890 
60,243 
64,076 
83,337 

275,587 
51,649 
30,752 
32,707 
61,419 

107,737 
70,299 

257.766 
93.844 
78,689 

184,979 

60,445 
20,810 



♦New- 
York 
State 
Census, 
1892. 



Police 

Census, 

1895. 



12,508 
1,038 
4,014 
18,405 
10,603 
22,897 
74,227 
3L374 
60,987 
70,1 
86,722 

364,412 
58,802 
31,904 
26,216 
57,430 

114.727 
67,469 

267,076 
94,969 
72,144 

194.893 

81,56 

26.508 



United 

States 

Census, 

1900. 



9.516 

1,488 

1.797 

19.554 

8,298 

20,004 

89,237 

29.059 

59.650 

71,879 

99,144 

476,602 
64,117 
34.035 
24,066 
52,808 

130,796 
6l,32S 

257,448 
89,798 
60,211 

189,261 

132,413 

A6S.094 



*New 
York 
State 
Census, 
1 90s. 



United 

States 

Census, 

1910. 



9,845 

933 

1,915 

21,337 

5.666 

19,670 

102,104 

33,189 

64,884 

66,438 

136.543 

806,674 

64,644 

38.269 

30,591 

55.926 

172,332 

62,601 

292,914 

73.299 

62,616 

209,152 

270,320 
160,660 



642,246 830,012 745,410 971,273 1,041 



1,206,299 1,515,301 1,710,715 1,801,739 1,851,060 2,050,600 2,384,326 2,762,522 



United States census, and the others, excepting when otherwise stated, the results of the New York State census, 
the New York State census of 1865. The totals at the foot of the columns for 1840. 1850, and i860 are the true totals, 
when summed up, do not give the same totals, that for 1840 being 313,161; for 1850, 515.557. and for i860, 813,668. 
not numbered at that time, but were called the West, South, Dock, East, North and Montgomerie Wards, the rest of 

by wards, but by assembly districts, so that only the total is available for this table. 

were formed from a part of Westchester County, and owing to the division of townships and villages, correct figures 

minimum, but not the true total. The portion represented above, which afterward became a part of New York, was 

formed from West Farms (1855). 

was annexed to The City of New York; the population of thistiannexed districtj June 1, 1900, according to the United 



191 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

Population of Former City of New York, From 1628 to 1910, With Dates and Numbers 

of Censuses. 



Year. 


Population. 


Authority. 




1628 


270 

1,000 

1,500 

4.302 

4.375 

5,841 

7,248 

8,622 

10,664 

11,717 

13.294 

13.046 

21,862 

23.614 

33.131 

60,51s 

96,373 

95.519 

123,706 

166,086 

202,589 

270,089 

312,710 


City Inspector's Report, 1861. 

City Inspector's Report, 1861. 

City Inspector's Report, 1861. 

Census (Noah Webster in "American Magazine,' 

City Inspector's Report, 1861. 

City Inspector's Report, 1861. 

City Inspector's Report, 1861. 

City Inspector's Report, 1861. 

City Inspector's Report, 186 1. 

City Inspector's Report, 1861. 

City Inspector's Report, 1861. 

Noah Webster, loc. cit. 

Noah Webster, loc. cit. 

Noah Webster, loc. cit. 

United States Census, August 1. 

United States Census, August r. 

United States Census, August 1. 

New York State Census, June 1. 

United States Census, August 1. 

United States Census, July 1. (?) 

United States Census, June 1. 

New York State Census, July 1. (?) 

United States Census, June 1. 




1656 










' New York, March, 1788). 






































1786 












1810 








1820 




1825 




1830 




1835 













1845. 
1850. 
1855. 
i860. 
1865. 
1870. 
1875. 
1880. 
1890. 
1900. 
1905. 

1910. 



371.223 

5 15.547 

629,904 

813,669 

726,386 

942,292 

*l,04i,886 

1,206,299 

1.5 13.501 

A2, 050,600 
2,384,326 
2,762,522 



New York State Census, July 1. 
United States Census, June 1. 
New York State Census, June 1. 
United States Census, June 1. 
New York State Census, June 1. 
United States Census, June 1. 
New York State Census, June 1. 
United States Census, June 1. 
United States Census, June I. 
United States Census, June 1. 
New York State Census, June I. 
United States Census, April 15. 



Note. — A city census, taken by order of the Common Council in 1805 (date uncertain), gave the popula- 
tion as 75,770; a second, taken under similar auspices in 1816 (date uncertain), gave the population variously 
at 93,634 and 100,619. 

* On January 1, 1874, a portion of Westchester County, comprising the present Twenty-third and Twenty- 
fourth Wards, was annexed to the City of New York; the population of this annexed district June 1, 1875, 
according to the New York State Census, was 36,194. 

a." On June 6, 1895, a portion of Westchester County, comprising a part of the present Twenty-fourth 
Ward, was annexed to the City of New York, the population of this annexed district June I, 1900, according to 
the United States Census, was 25,085. 



192 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Population of Former New York City, by Wards. 





i860. 


1865. 


1870. 


1875. 


1880. 


1890. 


1900. 




Ward. 


*U. S. 
Census. 


tPolice 
Census. 


1910. 


First 


18,148 
2,506 


9.852 
1. 194 


14.463 
I.3I2 


14,298 
1,012 


17,939 
1,608 


11,105 
922 


12,075 
1,510 


9,5i6 
1,488 


9,750 




933 


Third 


3.757 


3.367 


3.715 


2,874 


3.582 


3.757 


3.418 


1,797 


I.9IS 




21,994 


17.352 


23.748 


20,828 


20,996 


17.764 


19,337 


19,554 


21,336 


Fifth 


22,337 
26,696 
39.982 


18,205 
19.754 
36,962 


17.150 

21,153 
44,818 


15.951 
I9,86l 
45.636 


15.845 
20,196 
50,066 


12,351 
22,993 
57.231 


12,949 
23.058 
62,139 


8,298 
20,004 
89.237 


5,666 


Sixth 


1,967 


Seventh 


102,101 


Eighth 


39.406 


30,098 


34.913 


32,465 


35.879 


31,169 


41,890 


29.059 


33.182 


Ninth 


44,385 


38,504 


47.609 


49.403 


54.596 


54.654 


60,243 


59.650 


64,909 


Tenth 




31,537 




41.757 


47.554 


57.514 


64,076 


71,879 


66,439 




59,571 


58,953 


64,230 


63.855 


68,778 


75,708 


83.337 


99.144 


136,548 


Twelfth 


30,651 


28,259 


47.497 


60,510 


81,800 


244.793 


275.587 


476,602 


806,648 


Thirteenth 


32,917 


26,388 


33.364 


34.013 


37.797 


4S.882 


51,649 


64,117 


64,651 




28,080 


23.382 


26,436 


26,453 


30,171 


28,038 


30.752 


34.035 


38,321 


Fifteenth 


27.587 


25.572 


27.587 


25,529 


31,882 


25,185 


32,707 


24,066 


30,584 




45.176 


41.972 


48,359 


48,235 


52,188 


49,250 


61,419 


52,808 


55.926 


Seventeenth 


72.954 


79.563 


95.365 


101,075 


104,837 


102,668 


107,737 


130,796 


172,334 


Eighteenth 


57.462 


47.613 


59.593 


6I.I95 


66,611 


63,100 


70,299 


61,325 


62,821 




32,795 


39.945 


86,090 


118,727 


158,191 


232,978 


257,766 


257.44S 


292,950 




67.519 


61,884 


75.407 


79.764 


86,015 


84,218 


93.844 


89,798 


73.308 


Twenty-first. . . . 


49,017 


38,669 


56,703 


58,831 


66,536 


62,295 


78,689 


60,211 


62,345 


Twenty-second . 


61,725 


47.361 


7L349 


83,420 


111,606 


156,526 


184,979 


189,261 


209,154 


Twenty-third. . . 








24.320 


28,338 


53.621 


60,445 


132,413 


268,880 


JTwenty-fourth. 








11,874 


13.288 


19.779 


20,810 


A68.094 


162,062 


Total 


813,669 


726,386 


942,292 


1,041,886 


1,206,299 


1. 513.501 


1, 710,71s 


2,050,600 


2,762,433 



♦June 1, 1890. t October, 1890. % Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Wards annexed January 1, 1874. 

a. On June 6, 1895. a portion of Westchester County, comprising a part of the present Twenty-fourth 
Ward, was annexed to The City of New York, the population of this annexed district, June 1, 1900, according 
to the United States Census, was 25,085. 



193 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



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194 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



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195 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



>*h 



fO'tOO 0\ oi r^ oi O m 'to t^> oi rO fOCO O 00 f0t^t>.O\« POoO ^ v}0 hi m CO O 
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O Ot Ol O t-- rooo CO *i" O'OO N hi PTtion 100 NiororoO\iOO\t-"tNCOO 



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1 01 h. ro^-iON 10O r^.iororoOtioOr-* : +oiooO 

i_ r^ O O>o_ "* ^ ^ M . rt c^ »-t mo hico Oi'tiociH Hcocot^rof; 

O 00 00 o r* t^- r* r-co r- t^-co 00" 00" 00* 00" i> r^ r^o" c^o" o'o" r^o" r*- r-*o~o"o"o* to 



r-O O ro ^ *- ^f m r*. f- 10 -+ -rf-oo NOifli^OiOifOH roi^iorOH O ro hi ro O ro 

r^lOH w ro ft roO M lO -^tO -fO ONfOM rOOO ** 



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Ot 10 ro ^ m m 00 O who t^-O lO-rfr^O 01 ro i-n 10 Oi O POO 01 rO ^t O O Ot ro O 

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m Oioo 00^0 t^ O O'O fOO) ion ro(>H o Hio ror-r-o O hi ro^O r-co ^n h 
uit^N 100" o" r^ r--oo"co'oo" o" O o'oo" o" 000*00" 00" ^ O* C^ (> N O* o" w* oi <> O* o" C* 

MHHMMHHHHHMNNNHNHHHHMHHHNNNNMMMNH 



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I 00 01 CO ro 



COO O hi *t O N OMO N "* * 

O" O" O" CO" OO* CO" O" O" hi H m ro rf rf m rO oi" O hi" 
MMNHHN«N(S N 0INP1NMP)NNN 



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rooi o» hi fONuifOi^^-OiONoor-N oi r-rOHi oi O O t» , tO\C w. 

O^O 0\0 OO ro O h O m O ro rt hi rtO rOTtOoi rot^-t-r-Hi mo O roO fO^ 

hi" 00" r~- ^f 10 10 r^oo" o" 0\ 0" ro "t ^ h cohco o Ovroroni moo u^o r*- t? r+ u" 1^ ro 

oorooOoorooorOrO^^^^^^^^^rO^oo^^^^^^^Ttrfri-TtrtTj- 



Oh oi rOTfioO r>co 0\0 m oi ro *t lOO hCO OO hm ro-t 10O t^oo 0\ O hi oj 



196 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



M oo ro 10 o fj woo «)0 "5t~» ao oo « -t n oo i- ei -T "5 («■ " oo o oo oo -t t» >o 
t^wo « >-• "nice "> o -tao OO "onop -f * 

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©ooo M CN^h oi o oo 01 O co O r-oo 01 -toco -t^i n 0=0 -to co r-- O 'O O O 

o 1-ion 100 iflOMoaN^-^o ico >- o m oo <n >-< co o w <o - c jg s.y*2. 

sO I--COCOCOCO O O O O M »C Ol f^H io^t i>q woo o_o_ I- h o_ H re C N -T ^ -r 

M H H H H h" N H fj" H N N M Pi" N N* N Cl" M N N tO « N fO ^ ^ fO fO ^ ^ ^ ^ 

M O O\M\O00 O O fOO Oh Ot^O -t-O-tOOr0rc000r*-OO»CO re IC IC O 

o h 4 roco oo m o -i-ooo t^coo m i- m -to m t ^ f ^*oo-t'i-£--to S^r^? 

OOImmOOOwOOOwOOOOOOOOmOOOOOOOOOOCOOO 

(N O w Ol Nior-fOON O 01 Tt-000t--t< s '>0 "O ~t O HfOOON -t r- q »c « 
re <N O re-Oi O O -tO *r i> i> Oi I- O O <C ~+ O CO O Ol 10 O n >oO rO'O^'OM *T 
roioiom Ifl mO I- t*- t^co O CJ O CJ q 0_ 0_ W rO ic >o re iflOO t^oq <D t> q "f, N N 
MWHHMMWMMWHWHNHWCTWW Ol 01 N M 01 01 Ol O) OO N Ol PO fO f) 

C001000»OOOwr^O»OOOOO^OOMiciOiOTtOCOCOO)COO'-' 1 C>-'re»0 

ic t^oo t-00 COCO OCOCO O Ol O OO r-O OO O CO 00 »CO CO O ICO -J- r-0 rO 01 w 
^OlolOlOlOlOlOlOlOirororOrCOlOlOlOlOlOlOlOlOlOlOlOlOlOlOlOlNOlOl 



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'c^oforo^ciofNofooreooreoorcrcoororOooreooro^oe^ 



Ot^wO m O O N MO *^0 OOMO\01iHi-iOirOOlOt^ "to oo re tJ-00 NOiH 
r-O O toioOOO 10 r-o co o <*c re ^- ►■ 



oo -d-o oi^-oooi^-oi\e*i-o t-O oioocorereoiic ^tco re t- o >co ** m ^ 
uJ^oifl'N oi -t -t o re w o oi Tfoo co mic reco >e re -too -j- m o w « "cofc 
O ^ O oi •-• roieieoo OO 01 icOh oi o oi ^ o^ q t^ o_ co_ re co oi_ o_ r-^ q re oi_ 
oTreoorereoorereoorere^44fe^f-rFro ^f ^ Tt ^t 4 ie io ie ico* loioo'o'o 



^tococoo cjicmoO r^r-oi wieoi w ioco OO cor-r^rcoiooo r- ^to ooo 

TtO 444r]-rOfOfOfOrOrererO'-< m moOwmmOO >-< O O OCO CO CO CO r* 



2 * 

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o in m co oo roicro-i-H ooo o m cs r-o reret-Ofeo m c oi re OO "5NN 
00 O t^-O >-< -tO^l-Ot-OO t^O HOOtHiCH-tfOictNOcOfOrOfOrjON 
oo oi O m 01 Ol m re rO ooo r- i>co ioc» in ^tO ^ O O O O ^t m_ o_ hoom f>CJo; 
oireoorerorefOreoooOf^ooreoooooore 



■^-leco OOO ^^c fOO "^-co m oj tccococo o>cch t-co r-o co 0> w OO Ooo w 
O* ooo r^O O r- t- t-O t^-o t^t^-'rj-^J-'^-oi re^ieierereiorore^t'-i t- 1 >-> * *-> 



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MMoo ooioi onOic^NO rn OO TfM^twofOoiwoie re^tt; t-. m o r- 
m oo rsMic roo O O m "t i^o r- r- O OO rereoi Ot>M ^to wco^t OO OO 
woo oo S^li-ioicaan-t^MHioq; wo q ^to ic o_ n ^o o i>co ^ 
reooreoorere44^4^^^^4ioie-^Ttie ico" »e 100 OOO loioieieic 



oi icoi re^'tOi>reoi t-OOi>co Ot^ro mwo 01 roc\n hooco rcon o«ie 
t^.oo oo oo r^ t^-O o i- t^-O OOO io ic m >o u) m io v) >o -^O lo^^t^oe-^-Tj-ro 



lOOco 0)0 w leioro'+ie-t'oooo »ereoico \r> t 
-jw -tioH r-»eoo oi reco 1000 >-> o r^o» o* lo-^to* > 
irereoooioioiMMOioiMOiMiofOOireoiMOiret 



m N^t rtO OO OOO CO m t-CO Tf- M 
.h NOON'tOlO OO CO Ol Ol Ov 
OvO OOOOfOO'-'O >~l<l re ^t *-^ "tO °0 ^ Cj N . ^ ^ ^ ^ * 



t^^T+M -rtOl m reu-jOTiO OO ^ O i 

"' "<\q q roo re ^ 
-,."oo d cio fl't'tH ret-ico O Oforo»-« mco 100 r^ ^t "^ ie ie re 
re rO rererOoeoore^oo^^^rr^^^oo^re^'^t'^-^^T^-^-^t'^tTtTtrtTt 



o w oi re-tioo t^co OOtn o» oo-^ *oO nco Oi O « ci n 't ico r*co o O »h n 

COOOCOOOCOOOCOOOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOqOOO^i-'t-' 
OOOOCOCOCOCOCOOOCOOOCOOOCOOOOOCOCOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



197 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 






QOiOOO fOO 



100 i- r-oo o i- 1 o ro o too to r- 

O m w lOO CO "OO tO "0 01 01 O t- 

fOH ro ro to ro O OONiO 



r- oo O r^ oc co O O 'O O ^ O -tncci to t-» o *+ T i" 

IO rO Ol O O CO r0r»00 O t^- t-^ •-* ro to to "O O rOO 



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r- m OvO ro n ' 



n co m -t^N 



bro 10 V5 ^ r>- * 
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t-i -t- ro t-i o »-i i-i 

r-co -to 



O Ol Ol »-<cOl*O l N C) 01 O 00 O t^ 00 

rooo O '- , oo i-4 co O *tO oo o r-- to 



^■h ro Ttco to oi oi >-' o oi vie n w ^^i - 



00 ro ro 00O ' 



Oi C iO C O "^ 't w 00MO h« 00 

rf OO'-' h- OoOOC'-t 



tOO *t "0 © O ONo-fONNOHvO' 
J3 Ol O O Ol Ol ►-< O 't ^f 00 OO OO t-O I 



H f)M 01 



r-co CO OO 



r^ OO O oi oo oi i 
r- i>0 Ooo ro m ( 

00 ""t »O00 rf) 



J2 N 00 »fl O M i- 

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ro ro tOOO oo 



MO 00 o o 



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fO O o»vjn 



O r- toco oo 



r-- *-* ooo oi 

00 to «3- t-00 O 



O roco Oi-H 



OO M w NIONO\NH W'tMrtiCC 

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02 o^ 






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198 



o o o oo to w oo»noo , ^-'^)MtriooMOO' c +'+^- o ■-< 

O Ol O O r- l> OiOCOOOO^+ooooOOOoooiiOO 



IO *t tO t^ to 



r^O t-i roo 00 o -t r- to O O 1 

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■troioi 



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rj- m c-*- 00 to O r- 



O CO O 10 



tOt^O^Olt-0 O-IOCCO r^l^O lOM ^NNOCCC 1^* 

•D- 01 to ro O 01 rooo -t r- 10 00 -t « O roo OOO oi 



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t- 00 r- 01 00 ^f 


ro *i-oo OO OO -rf »-«o OO 010 
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Jt-'OOwOOwoiO-'tOO 
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►h I-* 01 00 000 -^t 00 to r- 01 to m 



m 10 ro O m 'too O CO t M-" to O O 

fOOOif^OOOHMh-tHM^ O 



HO rtO -t 




VITAL STATISTICS. 



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199 



1 866. 
1867. 
1868. 
1869. 
1870. 
1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874. 
187S. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 



1887. 



1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894- 
189S. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Typhoid Fever in Former 



Year. 



Total. 



Under 1 Year. 



Male. 


Female 


286 


228 


172 


175 


181 


148 


210 


168 


225 


197 


164 


87 


220 


166 


l8l 


132 


159 


146 


199 


177 


l80 


145 


171 


172 


163 


158 


125 


143 


202 


170 


350 


244 


267 


249 


356 


269 


267 


209 


229 


176 


237 


196 


235 


186 


235 


129 


228 


169 


201 


151 


221 


163 


230 


170 


234 


147 


194 


132 


207 


"5 


180 


117 


188 


in 


253 


123 


173 


121 


234 


138 


246 


166 


262 


137 


211 


139 


195 


114 


179 


131 


227 


142 


291 


129 


192 


99 


235 


90 


199 


ill 


18S 


no 


138 


80 



1 Year 

and Under 

2 Years. 



Male. 



Female. 



Male. 



Female. 



2 Years 

and Under 

5 Years. 



Male. 



Female. 



12 
19 
11 
IS 
7 
7 
8 
13 
2 

4 
4 



* Including typho-malarial fever. 



200 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



New York City, by Age and Sex* 



Total Under 


5 Years 


15 Years 


25 Years 


45 Years 


65 Years 


S Years. 


and Under 


and Under 


and Under 


and Under 


and Over. 




15 Years. 


25 Years. 


45 Years. 


6s Years. 




Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


22 


23 


45 


43 


72 


57 


103 


67 


34 


32 


10 


6 


26 


19 


21 


26 


27 


38 


48 


56 


36 


28 


14 


8 


12 


14 


31 


27 


47 


38 


57 


39 


26 


21 


8 


9 


17 


11 


32 


25 


50 


45 


62 


SI 


36 


28 


13 


8 


11 


16 


27 


28 


54 


43 


85 


73 


39 


21 


9 


16 


8 


4 


22 


19 


47 


30 


60 


26 


22 


6 


5 


2 


14 


12 


44 


30 


55 


56 


76 


43 


25 


18 


6 


7 


17 


8 


13 


20 


50 


37 


67 


37 


27 


25 


7 


5 


6 


8 


29 


24 


50 


42 


46 


40 


22 


25 


6 


7 


11 


6 


27 


38 


42 


47 


75 


55 


36 


20 


8 


n 


17 


10 


19 


21 


S3 


40 


64 


44 


18 


21 


9 


9 


17 


11 


28 


27 


47 


40 


50 


60 


23 


24 


6 


10 


13 


14 


24 


28 


50 


36 


49 


53 


21 


22 


6 


5 


IS 


10 


25 


23 


29 


32 


35 


45 


17 


25 


4 


8 


13 


18 


23 


32 


60 


39 


73 


45 


23 


28 


10 


8 


17 


20 


40 


32 


103 


85 


125 


67 


50 


28 


15 


12 


12 


15 


29 


33 


82 


80 


102 


90 


35 


22 


7 


9 


14 


21 


46 


42 


121 


9i 


127 


78 


39 


25 


9 


12 


13 


8 


3i 


23 


76 


60 


no 


83 


32 


29 


5 


6 


9 


12 


29 


18 


68 


59 


87 


57 


32 


27 


4 


3 


24 


10 


21 


29 


72 


55 


85 


62 


29 


32 


6 


8 


7 


15 


15 


26 


79 


42 


101 


69 


25 


25 


8 


9 


10 


3 


18 


21 


80 


44 


97 


43 


26 


14 


4 


4 


12 


6 


12 


19 


70 


54 


95 


64 


25 


18 


4 


8 


8 


6 


19 


21 


53 


43 


87 


59 


25 


19 


9 


3 


13 


11 


21 


31 


75 


50 


82 


48 


19 


18 


n 


5 


12 


6 


25 


19 


66 


59 


106 


59 


16 


23 


5 


4 


7 


6 


17 


13 


75 


39 


103 


64 


27 


22 


5 


3 


S 


S 


20 


19 


49 


35 


95 


51 


23 


21 


2 


1 


8 


4 


16 


14 


55 


36 


103 


41 


19 


19 


6 


1 


9 


S 


20 


22 


36 


31 


98 


42 


14 


16 


3 


1 


5 


9 


12 


19 


53 


26 


91 


45 


27 


9 




3 


S 


4 


27 


13 


89 


35 


105 


52 


23 


16 


4 


3 


3 


2 


10 


16 


39 


26 


96 


65 


23 


12 


2 




9 


8 


21 


II 


53 


34 


124 


65 


24 


19 


13 


1 


11 


9 


14 


19 


58 


52 


133 


61 


24 


19 


6 


6 


8 


4 


12 


22 


61 


36 


150 


58 


27 


II 


4 


6 


7 


7 


24 


28 


60 


30 


95 


61 


19 


9 


6 


4 


10 


12 


9 


13 


52 


30 


95 


43 


24 


13 


5 


3 


6 


4 


13 


18 


54 


35 


82 


60 


23 


10 


1 


4 


6 


7 


20 


23 


65 


42 


no 


53 


19 


13 


7 


4 


9 


2 


24 


19 


72 


33 


147 


55 


32 


18 


7 


2 


4 


S 


17 


7 


41 


30 


109 


44 


18 


9 


3 


4 


11 


5 


25 


II 


55 


20 


112 


42 


30 


II 


2 


1 


7 


2 


14 


12 


49 


30 


96 


55 


30 


II 


3 


1 


5 


8 


16 


20 


45 


30 


93 


39 


23 


12 


3 


I 


2 


4 


8 


13 


31 


27 


74 


24 


21 


9 


2 


3 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Measles in Former 



Year. 



1866. 
1867. 
1868. 
1869. 
1870. 
1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874- 
187s. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879- 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
188s . 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891- 
1892. 
1893- 
1894- 
1895- 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
190 1. 
1902. 
1903- 
1904., 
1905. 
1906., 
1907.. 
1908 . . 
1909.. 
1910.. 
1911. • 
1912.. 



Total. 



Male. Female. 



93 
272 

98 
271 
165 
213 
244 
141 
167 

76 
194 

87 
134 
130 
256 
210 
443 
371 
415 
37S 
346 
387 
325 
234 
38S 
316 
451 
202 
298 
374 
355 
192 
252 
202 
238 
150 
240 
167 
282 
170 
326 
225 
345 
219 
182 
256 
228 



60 
227 
102 
255 
133 
196 
219 
165 
152 

9i 
168 

68 
138 
114 
223 
219 
470 
345 
347 
361 
322 
380 
266 
236 
345 
347 
413 
191 
286 
419 
359 
199 
194 
177 
232 
122 
222 
154 
274 
144 
336 

205 

297 

227 

145 
236 

187 



Under I Year. 



Male. 



15 
66 
38 
74 
42 
60 
68 
40 
49 
12 
44 
34 
39 
33 
82 
52 
113 
109 
108 
103 
93 
119 
100 
66 
121 
82 
151 
57 
96 
84 
99 
53 
76 
60 
60 
37 
76 
58 
79 
60 
88 
74 
108 
68 
52 
65 
70 



Female. 



13 
42 
27 
62 
22 
42 
61 
50 
46 
22 
40 
14 
42 
16 
53 
62 

131 
83 

105 

107 
77 

no 
87 
55 
99 
94 

III 
54 
88 

108 



35 

56 
24 
50 
43 
66 
37 
98 
59 
84 
74 
37 
66 
52 



1 Year 
and Under 
2 Years. 



Male. 



45 

113 

31 

102 

57 

78 

84 

46 

60 

31 

68 

27 

45 

48 

86 

7i 

149 

131 

163 

145 

156 

138 

116 

95 

139 

116 

166 

85 

108 

167 

119 

80 

112 

81 

95 

53 

87 

69 

103 

72 

133 

9i 

144 

87 
88 
113 
91 



Female. 



97 

35 

95 

5i 

76 

72 

59 

49 

35 

61 

25 

38 

47 

81 

73 

150 

136 

120 

140 

127 

140 

103 

89 

141 

138 

150 

67 

94 

157 

133 

79 

88 

90 

101 



62 
121 

61 
132 

81 
119 

84 

52 
IOI 

72 



2 Years 

and Under 

5 Years. 



Male. 



24 
70 
23 
83 

54 
6r 
79 
43 
45 



41 
36 
75 
70 
145 
9i 
119 
99 
76 
109 
87 
5i 
105 
95 
113 
47 
73 
ios 
118 
52 
58 
45 
67 
48 
61 
32 
76 
31 
84 
39 
76 
54 
33 
63 
56 



Female. 



75 
30 
74 
49 
67 
69 
46 
40 
26 
55 
20 
44 
38 
71 
67 
147 
90 
99 
86 
95 
101 
63 
76 
87 
102 
122 
59 
85 
132 
116 
SO 
49 
46 
55 
40 
73 
41 
75 
34 
91 
54 
75 
59 
47 
S3 
50 



202 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



New York City, by Age and Sex. 



Total 


Under 


5 Years 
and Under 


15 Years 
and Under 


25 Years 
and Under 


45 Years 
and Under 


63 Years 


5 Years. 


IS Years. 


25 Years. 


45 Years. 


6s Years. 


and Over. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female 


84 


54 


9 


5 








1 










249 


214 


22 


12 


1 






1 


















92 


92 


6 


8 




2 






















259 


231 


ir 


20 




4 


1 




















153 


122 


11 


10 






1 


1 


















199 


185 


14 


8 




3 






















231 


202 


12 


IS 


1 


1 




1 


















129 


i-SS 


10 


7 


1 


1 


1 


2 


















154 


135 


11 


12 


2 


1 




4 


















68 


83 


8 


8 


























171 


156 


22 


9 




1 


1 


2 


















81 


59 


6 


8 








1 


















125 


124 


8 


11 




1 


1 


2 


















117 


101 


12 


12 




1 


1 




















243 


205 


13 


17 








1 


















193 


202 


16 


14 




2 


1 


1 


















407 


428 


33 


33 


3 


3 




6 


















331 


309 


35 


28 


3 


3 


2 


5 


















390 


324 


23 


19 




2 


1 


2 


1 
















347 


333 


26 


24 




3 


1 


1 


1 
















325 


299 


16 


22 


2 


1 


3 




















366 


351 


16 


22 


3 


4 


2 


2 




1 














303 


253 


19 


8 . 




2 


3 


2 




1 














212 


220 


18 


14 


4 






2 


















365 


327 


16 


16 






3 


1 


1 














c 


293 


334 


18 


12 


3 




2 


1 


















430 


383 


18 


27 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 
















189 


180 


9 


11 


1 




3 




















277 


267 


20 


15 




3 


I 


1 


















356 


397 


15 


20 


1 


1 


2 


I 


















336 


337 


16 


16 


2 


3 


I 


2 




1 














185 


184 


6 


12 




2 


I 


1 


















246 


IS5 


6 


5 




2 




2 


















186 


171 


16 


5 








1 


















222 


212 


IS 


15 




2 




2 


1 


1 














138 


112 


11 


7 




I 




2 


1 
















224 


205 


13 


11 


1 


2 


I 


2 


1 


2 














159 


I46 


5 


8 


2 




I 




















258 


262 


17 


9 


3 


2 


4 


1 


















163 


132 


5 


10 




2 


1 




1 
















305 


321 


14 


13 


4 




3 


2 


















204 


194 


12 


8 


2 


2 


7 


1 


















328 


278 


IS 


18 


1 


I 


1 




















209 


217 


9 


8 


1 


I 




1 


















173 


136 


9 


7 




I 




1 


















241 


220 


11 


16 


2 




2 




















217 


174 


9 


12 


2 


I 























203 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths front Scarlet Fever in Former 



Year. 



1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
187s 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
188s 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 

1893 
1894 
189s 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 

1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 

1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 



Total. 



Male. Female. 



420 
328 
417 
488 
499 
397 
S2i 
570 
476 
262 
447 
489 
516 
782 
323 
956 
1,072 
367 
314 
29S 
198 
297 
689 
622 
201 
616 
482 
285 
263 
248 
203 
265 
248 
161 
186 
322 
337 
231 
259 
137 
no 
210 
415 
206 
264 
200 
191 



386 

327 
444 
478 
476 
394 
469 
47S 
403 
252 
444 
494 
583 
695 
295 
1,008 
994 
377 
294 
264 
173 
292 
672 
620 
207 
604 
495 
266 
278 
220 
199 
235 
275 
171 
129 
313 
298 
234 
275 
134 
102 
211 
386 
202 
259 
215 
177 



Under 1 Year. 



Male. 



36 
25 
34 
36 
39 
28 
43 
37 
34 
30 
32 
32 
24 
52 
18 
47 
63 
36 
30 
29 
14 
13 
48 
23 
9 
40 
39 
24 
17 
16 



Female. 



29 
47 
43 
22 
3i 
39 
29 
19 
27 
34 
36 
33 
15 
50 
53 
31 
2S 



39 

43 
14 
26 

29 
23 
14 



6 

24 



1 Year 

and Under 

2 Years. 



Male. 



76 
54 
73 
105 
102 
69 
91 
99 
79 
52 
84 
85 
106 
145 
66 
164 
196 
68 
67 
67 
46 
57 
113 
131 
35 
105 
63 
40 
50 
34 
34 
56 
48 
27 
40 
47 
47 
41 
37 
19 
16 
24 
60 
39 
41 
24 
47 



Female. 



68 
92 
88 
5i 
69 
72 
56 
39 
76 
75 
100 
135 
54 
152 
142 
63 
55 
52 
34 
58 
100 
95 
40 
95 
74 
40 
39 
41 
25 
33 
40 
32 
22 
39 
48 
35 
43 
16 
9 
26 
53 
31 
37 
33 
29 



2 Years 

and Under 

5 Years. 



Male. 



210 
179 
200 
246 
235 
205 
249 
297 
234 
US 
222 
236 
265 
404 
180 
467 
529 
167 
133 
129 
101 
169 
347 
325 
99 
319 
244 
142 
127 
149 
106 
127 
H9 
83 
77 
151 
169 
91 
123 
64 
48 
99 
191 
87 
119 
104 
83 



Female. 



178 
182 
205 
223 
246 
220 
242 
224 
181 
117 
208 
253 
290 
351 
152 
492 
489 
174 
125 
118 
96 
151 
351 
298 
102 
302 
235 
127 
136 
105 
105 
124 
151 
81 
62 
138 
130 
101 
in 
58 
43 
88 
142 
92 
118 
89 
76 



204 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



New York City, by Age and Sex. 



Total 


Under 


S Years 
and Under 


IS Years 
and Under 


25 Years 
and Under 


4S Years 
and Under 


65 Years 
and Over. 


S Years. 


IS Years. 


25 Years. 


45 Years. 


6s Years. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


322 


304 


96 


77 


2 


3 




2 










258 


257 


63 


68 


4 


1 


3 


1 
















307 


302 


103 


119 


3 


10 


4 


10 




3 












387 


362 


88 


106 


10 


5 


3 


5 
















376 


377 


116 


88 


5 


8 


2 


3 
















302 


293 


85 


9i 


5 


7 


5 


3 
















383 


342 


122 


109 


4 


6 


12 


12 
















433 


335 


127 


124 


7 


11 


3 


5 
















347 


266 


119 


117 


5 


11 


4 


9 


1 














197 


175 


55 


64 


8 


9 


2 


4 
















338 


3H 


103 


122 


2 


7 


4 


4 
















353 


362 


131 


123 


4 


4 




5 
















395 


426 


in 


143 


4 


7 


6 


4 




2 










1 


601 


519 


173 


161 


8 


7 




8 
















264 


221 


54 • 


70 


2 


2 


3 


2 
















678 


694 


258 


278 


9 


19 


10 


15 


1 


1 










1 


788 


684 


240 


262 


24 


25 


18 


23 


2 














271 


268 


88 


84 


5 


16 


2 


9 


1 














230 


20S 


64 


72 


11 


14 


9 


2 
















225 


191 


63 


64 


3 


6 


4 


3 
















161 


140 


33 


30 


2 




1 


3 
















239 


221 


52 


66 


4 


3 


2 


1 
















508 


490 


163 


173 


11 


3 


7 


6 
















479 


436 


118 


147 


14 


23 


10 


14 
















143 


156 


55 


45 


2 


2 


1 


4 
















464 


423 


136 


165 


11 


10 


5 


5 












1 


346 


338 


118 


131 


12 


16 


6 


7 




2 








1 


206 


190 


69 


68 


6 


4 


4 


4 














194 


189 


58 


72 


7 


11 


3 


6 
















199 


158 


42 


57 


4 


1 


3 


4 
















148 


142 


53 


52 




1 


2 


4 
















193 


172 


69 


59 




4 


I 




2 














185 


209 


56 


56 


2 


7 


5 


3 
















120 


121 


38 


48 


3 


2 




















139 


90 


38 


32 


2 


6 


7 


I 
















209 


195 


100 


102 


7 


7 


5 


8 




1 












236 


193 


88 


90 


8 


8 


5 


6 




1 












141 


146 


77 


72 


7 


7 


6 


9 
















175 


166 


66 


90 


11 


12 


7 


6 




1 












95 


78 


32 


45 


8 


5 


2 


5 




1 












68 


63 


35 . 


33 


4 


5 


3 


1 
















131 


120 


65 


76 


7 


10 


5 


5 


2 














269 


219 


123 


136 


14 


14 


8 


16 


1 


1 












I4S 


134 


5i 


52 


8 


8 


2 


8 
















174 


166 


65 


62 


15 


14 


8 


14 


2 


3 












136 


128 


52 


60 


3 


18 


8 


9 


1 














139 


113 


43 


S5 


6 


2 


1 


7 


1 




1 




1 



20$ 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Smallpox in Former 



Year. 



Total. 



Male. 



Female. 



Under I Year. 



Male. Female. 



i Year 

and Under 

2 Years. 



Male. Female. 



2 Years 

and Under 

S Years. 



Male. 



Female. 



1866. 
1867. 



1870.. 
1871.. 

1872.. 

1873.. 
*lS74- 
1875.. 
1876.. 
1877.. 
187S.. 
1879.. 



1882. 
1883. 



1886. 
1887. 



1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
I89S. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899- 
1900. 
190 1. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904- 
I90S. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
191 1. 
1912. 



29 

12 

15 

104 

167 

454 

548 

67 

281 

709 

179 

10 

1 

13 

19 

262 

142 



16 



62 
58 



60 
97 

7 



11 

6 

244 

139 



15 

7 

II 

99 

126 

351 

381 

SO 

203 

571 

136 

4 

1 

12 

12 

189 

117 

4 

10 

9 

37 

23 



33 

42 

57 

3 



7 

6 

155 

79 



6 

3 

4 

19 

32 

74 

85 

15 

57 

114 

25 



36 
9 



3 

4 
28 
37 
5S 
60 
16 
42 
no 

25 



17 

34 
40 
1 
33 
86 
13 



33 
3« 
4 
31 
70 



U 



26 
53 
60 
2 
45 
no 
19 



34 
32 



42 

10 



27 
24 
43 
52 
3 
28 
108 
26 



3i 
14 



* Vaccinating corps organized September 29, 1874, in accordance with act of Legislature passed June 
15. 1874- 



206 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



New York City, by Age and Sex. 



Total Under 
S Years. 



5 Years 
and Under 
IS Years. 



15 Years 
and Under 
25 Years. 



25 Years 
and Under 
45 Years. 



45 Years 
and Under 
65 Years. 



65 Years 
and Over. 



Male. 



5 
9 

59 

75 
161 
185 

18 
135 
310 

57 



9 

5 

S7 
63 



Female. 



7 

3 

7 

68 

71 

134 

150 

23 

101 

288 

62 



S 

5 

95 

.S3 



Male. Female. 



9 

16 
58 

54 

7 

25 

71 



26 



14 
58 
52 
3 
26 



Male. 



84 

in 

10 

39 

no 

28 



50 

IS 



38 



Female. 



63 

76 

9 

28 



3 
30 



Male. 



3 

5 

23 

44 

131 

168 

26 

72 

181 

64 

5 



78 

40 

3 



14 
25 
41 

4 



Female. 



77 
83 
14 
39 
108 
26 



3 
30 



Male. 



19 
24 
5 
8 
34 
17 



Female. 



6 
17 
16 

1 

7 

30 



Male. Female. 



P7 

30 



4 

3 

94 

30 



85 
68 



207 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Whooping Cough in Former 



Year. 



Total. 



Under I Year. 



Male. 



Female. 


Male. 


66 


23 


90 


39 


128 


53 


206 


74 


122 


44 


269 


103 


304 


135 


151 


56 


275 


no 


222 


114 


228 


97 


251 


98 


223 


86 


284 


128 


143 


64 


151 


73 


369 


155 


158 


80 


264 


131 


279 


118 


314 


144 


101 


49 


335 


119 


362 


167 


274 


US 


184 


95 


215 


71 


293 


122 


169 


57 


280 


114 


246 


112 


176 


73 


244 


105 


192 


74 


175 


69 


94 


31 


210 


100 


III 


41 


70 


28 


134 


5i 


107 


5i 


94 


59 


67 


36 


143 


57 


100 


41 


140 


67 


103 


42 



Female. 



1 Year 
and Under 
2 Years. 



Male. 



Female. 



2 Years 

and Under 

5 Years. 



Male. 



Female. 



1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884, 
1885, 
1886, 
1887, 
1888, 
1889 
1890, 
1891. 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896. 
1897. 
1898, 
1899 
1900. 
190 1. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 



65 

89 
152 

79 
196 
261 
117 
214 
185 
178 
189 
159 
253 
134 
135 
289 
169 
226 
216 
261 

87 
238 
285 
213 
168 
156 
249 
103 
216 
189 
132 
198 
158 
143 

65 
175 

76 

50 
ios 

95 
107 

56 
in 

77 
116 

73 



45 

64 

98 

61 

136 

143 

79 

IS I 

123 

113 

112 

113 

132 

60 

63 

187 

88 

139 

127 

159 

48 

163 

173 

133 

96 

104 

126 

76 

127 

H3 

87 

116 

99 

78 

43 

III 

57 

31 

70 

54 

55 

38 

76 

54 

60 

44 



27 
46 
16 
65 
66 
29 
58 
50 
40 
47 
37 
69 
3S 
33 
80 
45 
56 
57 
70 
23 
58 
67 
49 
42 
5i 
83 
17 
58 
42 
26 
62 
58 
38 



31 
25 
30 
14 

32 



26 
43 
63 
38 
78 
75 
41 
69 
55 
59 
75 
63 
87 
53 
54 
90 
37 
68 
81 
88 
30 
89 
97 
79 
44 
58 
95 
45 
92 
66 
52 
70 
40 
45 
29 
49 
29 
22 
33 
25 
16 
17 
35 
24 
40 
27 



26 
50 
31 
45 
19 
35 
39 
33 
49 
30 
23 
46 
35 
30 
39 
40 
13 
47 
49 
40 
28 
32 
39 
26 
38 
29 
31 
28 
25 
32 
II 
28 
13 



15 
16 
18 
39 
22 
49 
72 
29 
49 
40 
49 
53 
42 
55 
26 
30 
78 
28 
50 
62 
57 
18 
65 
81 
56 
39 
45 
59 
43 
50 
57 
31 
51 
46 
41 
19 
44 
22 
15 
27 
23 
17 
10 
27 
16 
37 
26 



208 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



New York City, by Age and Sex. 



Total Under 


5 Years 
and Under 


15 Years 

and Under 


25 Years 
and Under 


45 Years 
and Under 


65 Years 


5 Years. 


15 Years. 


25 Years. 


45 Years. 


65 Years. 


and Over. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. ^ 


[ale. 


Female. N 


[ale. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


47 


64 


1 


2 


















6S 


87 




3 


























88 


125 


1 


3 


























146 


200 


6 


6 


























78 


121 


1 


1 


























194 


263 


2 


6 


























251 


290 


10 


14 


























116 


149 


1 


1 














1 










213 


269 


1 


4 














1 










183 


218 


2 


4 


























172 


221 


5 


6 






1 




















184 


240 


5 


11 


























156 


218 


3 


4 
















1 










246 


274 


7 


10 


























132 


139 


2 


4 


























129 


147 


6 


4 


























281 


355 


8 


13 




1 






















160 


153 


8 


3 


1 


1 






















217 


257 


9 


7 


























214 


270 


2 


9 


























254 


304 


7 


10 


























85 


96 


2 


4 








1 


















224 


317 


14 


17 








1 


















283 


351 


2 


11 


























204 


268 


7 


6 


1 




1 




















165 


179 


3 


4 








1 


















154 


207 


2 


8 


























244 


280 


5 


12 








1 


















100 


164 


3 


5 


























210 


269 


5 


10 




1 


1 




















183 


236 


6 


10 


























130 


170 


2 


6 


























195 


237 


3 






6 






















157 


185 


1 


6 














1 










139 


164 


4 


9 








1 






1 










64 


91 


1 


2 


























171 


204 


4 


6 


























76 


108 




3 


























46 


68 


3 


2 


1 
























102 


130 


3 


3 


























93 


102 


2 


5 


























1 06 


88 


1 


6 


























54 


65 


2 


1 


























105 


138 


5 


5 


























75 


94 


2 


5 














1 










ill 


137 


5 


3 
























70 


97 


3 


5 
















1 











209 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Diphtheria and Croup in 



Year. 



Total. 



Male. 



Female. 



Under r Year. 



Male. 



Female. 



i Year 

and Under 

2 Years. 



2 Years 

and Under 

S Years. 



Male. 



Female. 


Male. 


100 


168 


88 


123 


73 


125 


101 


192 


86 


162 


93 


168 


132 


263 


163 


433 


212 


510 


330 


715 


228 


528 


168 


371 


164 


353 


133 


284 


251 


576 


344 


790 


244 


5io 


174 


356 


215 


424 


246 


530 


291 


650 


302 


772 


284 


626 


273 


544 


188 


430 


202 


494 


222 


580 


273 


617 


301 


731 


232 


477 


197 


405 


213 


350 


ior 


193 


149 


240 


108 


297 


123 


275 


130 


256 


147 


275 


169 


273 


106 


181 


119 


223 


139 


212 


147 


206 


ISO 


240 


136 


218 


108 


ISO 


80 


127 



Female. 



1866. 
1867. 
1868. 
1869. 
1870. 
1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
I874. 
1875. 
1876. 
1877- 
1878. 
1879- 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885- 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891- 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
189S. 
1896 
1897. 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 



416 

299 

327 

413 

364 

359 

557 

949 

1,092 

i,Si6 

1,176 

761 

767 

598 

1,154 

1.673 

1,136 

836 

939 

1,078 

1,393 

1,617 

1,321 

1,181 

920 

1,017 

1,119 

1,253 

1,464 

1,017 

888 

770 

475 

525 

669 

620 

633 

628 

66 r 

436 

559 

544 

589 

573 

56S 

409 

341 



387 
284 
292 

398 

365 

345 

564 

934 

1,167 

1. 571 

1,101 

662 

739 

595 

1,146 

1,614 

1,118 

817 

899 

1,102 

1,302 

1.439 

1,232 

1,110 

863 

953 
987 
1,305 
1,406 
959 
875 
820 
448 
560 
607 
607 
509 
604 
611 
424 
424 
471 
508 
492 
469 
392 
313 



92 

64 

73 

66 

48 

47 

72 

95 

107 

145 

121 

80 

91 

68 

101 

16s 

113 

97 

103 

104 

159 

164 

120 

136 

99 

ill 

92 

98 

125 

130 

96 

82 

52 

62 

72 

64 

7i 

73 

85 

69 

63 

87 

99 

92 

82 

58 

53 



71 

61 

43 

68 

50 

37 

57 

96 

90 

106 

103 

61 

S3 

53 

77 

131 

102 

77 

69 

94 

117 

99 

118 

104 

7i 

85 

67 

no 

109 

84 

65 
74 
35 
52 
64 
77 
S3 
56 
49 
54 
55 
64 
83 
57 
47 
62 
33 



H3 
79 
87 
no 
106 
106 
142 
187 
227 
339 
321 
173 
179 
IS3 
280 
371 
291 
224 
230 
256 
329 
383 
325 
287 
233 
232 
269 
300 
351 
247 
241 
196 
150 
133 
147 
172 
179 
151 
183 
in 
172 
157 
186 
175 
171 
129 
108 



156 
105 
134 
176 
170 
157 
270 
421 
509 
723 
530 
300 
356 
290 
571 
758 
533 
373 
436 
551 
614 
726 
577 
499 
432 
46S 
494 
612 
701 
449 
430 
354 
203 
257 
279 
283 
213 
264 
264 
180 
171 
186 
193 
200 
171 
151 
131 



210 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Former New York City, by Age and Sex. 



Total Under 
S Years. 


5 Years 
and Under 
15 Years. 


15 Years 
and Under 
25 Years. 


25 Years 
and Under 
45 Years. 


45 Years 
and Under 
65 Years. 


■ d 

65 Years 
and Over. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female 


Male. 


Female 


Male. 


Female. 


373 


327 


33 


44 


4 


5 


2 


5 


3 


4 


1 


2 


266 


254 


26 


25 




3 


4 


2 


3 








28s 


250 


35 


39 


1 


I 


3 


1 


3 


1 






368 


345 


40 


47 


1 


I 


1 


4 


3 


1 






316 


306 


42 


50 


3 


2 


2 


S 


1 


1 




1 


321 


287 


33 


52 


2 


4 


2 


1 






1 


1 


477 


459 


75 


97 


3 


2 


2 


3 




1 




2 


715 


680 


211 


242 


9 


3 


11 


3 


1 


5 


2 


1 


844 


811 


225 


333 


8 


9 


10 


8 


4 


4 


1 


2 


1,199 


1,159 


297 


388 


8 


10 


9 


9 


3 


5 






970 


861 


I87 


213 


9 


II 


4 


12 


S 


3 


1 


1 


624 


529 


123 


125 


6 


5 


6 


2 


1 


I 


1 




623 


573 


135 


156 


3 


3 


4 


1 


2 


4 




2 


SOS 


476 


86 


104 


2 


7 


5 


6 




1 




1 


957 


899 


189 


238 


1 


3 


6 


4 


I 


2 






1.326 


1.233 


324 


347 


14 


19 


7 


10 


2 


4 




1 


914 


879 


200 


219 


11 


6 


7 


8 


3 


4 


1 


3 


677 


624 


148 


165 


4 


15 


7 


9 




4 






757 


720 


163 


166 


10 


S 


5 


7 


2 


1 


2 




890 


S91 


176 


200 


6 


4 


S 


4 


1 


2 




1 


1,138 


1,022 


242 


261 


4 


6 


8 


10 


1 


2 




I 


I.3I9 


1,127 


272 


276 


IS 


19 


9 


13 


2 


2 




2 


1,071 


979 


224 


236 


12 


11 


10 


4 


2 


2 


2 




967 


876 


200 


213 


5 


11 


5 


8 




2 


4 


... 


762 


691 


151 


152 


1 


9 


4 


9 


1 


2 


1 


... 


837 


752 


163 


182 


6 


11 


8 


4 


3 


4 




... 


941 


783 


160 


18s 


9 


10 


6 


5 


2 


4 


I 




1,015 


995 


226 


283 


5 


12 


2 


8 


3 


5 


2 


2 


I.207 


1, III 


249 


275 


4 


5 


3 


11 


1 


3 




1 


854 


765 


146 


181 


S 


5 


9 


6 


3 


2 






742 


692 


130 


167 


2 


8 


II 


7 


3 


1 






628 


641 


128 


170 


8 


3 


S 


5 


1 


I 






395 


339 


65 


103 


4 


I 


6 


5 


4 




1 


... 


435 


458 


83 


86 


1 


4 


6 


9 




3 






Si6 


451 


131 


138 


9 


7 


11 


10 


2 






1 


511 


483 


95 


115 


S 


6 


S 


3 


3 




I 




506 


396 


113 


98 


5 


9 


8 


6 


I 








499 


467 


109 


131 


8 


4 


8 


2 


3 




1 




541 


482 


103 


101 


6 


8 


8 


13 


2 


5 


I 


3 


36l 


340 


68 


73 


3 


5 


4 


S 








1 


458 


345 


85 


66 


6 


7 


9 


3 


I 


3 






456 


389 


67 


66 


4 


4 


11 


11 


6 


1 






49 X 


423 


74 


74 


11 


4 


7 


5 


6 


2 






507 


407 


57 


73 


7 


5 


2 


5 




I 




1 


471 


354 


76 


100 


6 


7 


10 


4 


2 


3 




1 


337 


321 


S3 


50 


6 


7 


9 


12 


3 


2 


I 




388 


244 


40 


60 


5 


3 


5 


3 


2 


2 


I 


1 



211 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Pulmonary Tuberculosis in 



Year. 



Male. I Female. 



Under I Year. 



Male. 



Female. 



i Year 

and Under 

2 Years. 



Male. 



Female. 



2 Years 

and Under 

S Years. 



Male. 



Female. 



1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
187S 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884, 
1885. 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
189S 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 



I.79I 
1,648 
1,812 
1,748 
2,097 
2,233 
2,176 

2,121 
2,096 
2,200 
2,192 
2,051 
2,256 
2,280 
2,446 
2,913 
2,841 
2,847 
2,835 
2,802 
3,149 

3,000 
3,013 
2,990 
3,l6o 
2,994 
2,917 

3.075 
2,821 
3.H3 
2,991 
2,878 
2,990 
3,247 
3.223 
3,306 
3.025 
3.24S 
3,485 
3,596 
3,814 
3,933 
3,8oo 
3,825 
3,770 
3,885 
3,815 



1,690 
1,608 
1,602 
1,616 
1,933 
1,953 
2,098 
2,013 
1,938 
1,972 
2,002 
1,993 
2,210 
2,063 
2,260 
2,399 
2,406 
2,443 
2,400 
2,394 
2,328 
2,260 
2,247 
2,189 
2,332 
2,166 
2,116 
2,049 
1.837 
2,092 
2,003 
l,96s 
1,967 
1,991 
2,055 
1,927 
1,868 
2,018 
2,026 
2,082 
2,086 
2,097 
2,131 
2,003 
1,986 
1,909 
1,833 



41 
45 



39 

26 
28 
19 
22 
23 
27 
44 
36 
48 
39 
43 
33 
57 
SO 
68 
55 
39 
32 
30 
27 
32 
31 
31 
45 
24 
28 
29 
37 
28 
25 
14 
17 
26 
36 
28 
24 
26 
41 
18 
24 



37 
32 
II 
4 
16 
35 
18 
19 
23 
28 



34 
28 
30 
29 
48 
32 
56 
41 
40 
44 
40 
19 
31 
25 
29 
29 



30 
23 

14 

-'5 



27 
31 
34 
22 
32 
40 
29 
15 



26 
23 
29 
31 
23 
24 



20 
35 
28 
16 
30 
24 
15 
29 
27 
18 
29 
26 
24 



28 

34 



30 

30 
32 



29 
29 
23 
23 



24 
26 



28 

29 
26 



17 
13 

14 
20 
24 
17 
24 
19 
30 
10 
18 
17 



45 
21 
24 
28 
30 
32 
36 
30 
25 
32 



31 
28 
29 
26 
28 
26 
24 
36 
28 
23 
2 3 
17 
22 
19 
24 
26 
24 
22 
13 
13 
9 
24 
27 



212 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Former New York City, by Age and Sex. 



Total Under 
S Years. 


S Years 
and Under 
IS Years. 


IS Years 
and Under 
25 Years. 


25 Years 
and Under 
45 Years. 


45 Years 
and Under 
65 Years. 


63 Years 
and Over. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


113 


9i 


46 


65 


318 


360 


813 


771 


412 


289 


89 


114 


97 


101 


46 


37 


269 


324 


779 


775 


368 


294 


89 


77 


79 


68 


37 


45 


301 


344 


869 


766 


426 


292 


100 


87 


52 


54 


42 


40 


270 


334 


857 


796 


419 


286 


108 


106 


84 


68 


40 


52 


314 


393 


995 


927 


533 


382 


131 


III 


III 


93 


47 


47 


343 


350 


1,130 


988 


494 


359 


108 


116 


91 


81 


37 


56 


366 


378 


1,108 


1,074 


474 


385 


100 


124 


73 


74 


26 


52 


348 


418 


1,039 


992 


507 


357 


128 


120 


65 


67 


35 


61 


338 


344 


1,059 


966 


497 


387 


102 


113 


76 


74 


49 


65 


368 


439 


1,084 


932 


515 


345 


108 


117 


71 


75 


48 


68 


380 


434 


1,099 


941 


483 


375 


in 


109 


72 


74 


32 


42 


343 


450 


974 


937 


516 


376 


114 


114 


104 


88 


25 


45 


38l 


456 


1,060 


1,062 


573 


431 


113 


128 


95 


66 


28 


44 


389 


472 


1,127 


1,006 


538 


369 


103 


106 


IOO 


71 


43 


63 


432 


486 


1,196 


1,133 


S61 


378 


114 


129 


89 


76 


47 


66 


478 


499 


1,472 


1,259 


674 


385 


153 


114 


91 


117 


34 


59 


471 


507 


1,431 


1,117 


667 


471 


147 


135 


85 


87 


33 


56 


487 


528 


1,416 


1,189 


698 


440 


128 


143 


103 


104 


36 


55 


498 


460 


1,399 


1,221 


662 


428 


137 


132 


US 


85 


36 


63 


441 


493 


1.444 


1,213 


655 


435 


in 


105 


131 


85 


38 


48 


488 


505 


1,618 


1,173 


721 


389 


153 


128 


106 


100 


43 


52 


520 


476 


1,56s 


1,133 


643 


378 


123 


121 


78 


76 


34 


66 


480 


523 


1,631 


1,111 


682 


379 


108 


92 


79 


59 


44 


66 


462 


5il 


1,599 


1,105 


700 


332 


106 


116 


76 


75 


22 


70 


503 


498 


1,710 


1,199 


725 


405 


124 


85 


61 


57 


30 


62 


489 


481 


1,635 


1,116 


640 


355 


139 


95 


85 


73 


34 


61 


479 


466 


1.547 


1,088 


654 


336 


118 


92 


84 


73 


35 


67 


574 


469 


1,584 


1,012 


675 


337 


123 


91 


73 


55 


35 


47 


456 


430 


1,520 


977 


636 


258 


101 


70 


96 


69 


21 


53 


482 


488 


1,738 


1,077 


660 


318 


116 


87 


63 


57 


24 


56 


469 


496 


1,684 


1,014 


636 


291 


115 


89 


65 


63 


28 


41 


484 


443 


1,573 


1,012 


633 


3lS 


95 


88 


56 


44 


28 


48 


449 


393 


1.643 


1,037 


692 


344 


122 


101 


77 


67 


33 


50 


438 


440 


1,879 


1, OS 1 


675 


288 


145 


95 


77 


39 


29 


48 


415 


409 


1,830 


1,172 


734 


308 


138 


79 


64 


53 


29 


53 


442 


380 


1,934 


1,054 


723 


302 


114 


85 


47 


41 


25 


48 


374 


441 


1,796 


1,029 


700 


248 


83 


61 


41 


38 


30 


59 


436 


461 


1,896 


1,128 


759 


267 


83 


65 


67 


55 


46 


68 


466 


498 


2,054 


1,083 


772 


268 


80 


54 


79 


59 


30 


78 


480 


477 


2,082 


1,114 


840 


303 


85 


51 


81 


59 


38 


67 


454 


486 


2,110 


1,113 


1,006 


3i8 


125 


43 


65 


67 


40 


76 


500 


483 


2,145 


1,094 


1,069 


306 


114 


71 


79 


59 


41 


65 


492 


484 


2, III 


1,118 


971 


327 


106 


78 


97 


80 


31 


76 


502 


429 


2.132 


1.034 


949 


327 


114 


57 


57 


49 


25 


55 


479 


469 


2,050 


1.056 


1,045 


294 


114 


63 


70 


52 


45 


7i 


442 


450 


2,046 


993 


1,129 


286 


153 


57 


56 


56 


34 


68 


458 


414 


2,046 


933 


1,097 


303 


124 


59 



213 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Cancer in Former 



Year. 



Total. 



Male. 



Female. 



Under I Year. 



Male. 



Female, 



i Year 

and Under 

2 Years. 



Male. 



Female. 



2 Years 

and Under 

5 Years. 



Male. 



Female. 



1 866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878. 
1879 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893- 
1894- 
189s. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903- 
1904- 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909- 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 



74 
89 
84 
78 
no 
93 
114 
138 
124 
147 
152 
153 
182 
193 
219 
244 
265 
221 
263 
228 
257 
278 
284 
276 
356 
318 
356 
383 
362 
391 
449 
474 
497 
509 
558 
629 
590 
655 
710 
768 
766 
839 
827 
920 
9S2 
1,008 
1,050 



195 

204 

231 

226 

245 

242 

278 

287 

292 

277 

307 

342 

388 

379 

440 

462 

467 

457 

468 

526 

522 

554 

586 

572 

598 

584 

640 

610 

660 

639 

692 

743 

763 

812 

915 

946 

946 

1,028 

1,030 

1,066 

1,090 

1. 193 

1,193 

1,203 

1,256 

1,368 

1.447 



214 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



City of New York, by Age and Sex. 



t: 

Total Under 
S Years. 


5 Years 
and. Under 
IS Years. 


IS Years 
and Under 
25 Years. 


25 Years 
and Under 
45 Years. 


45 Years 
and Under 
65 Years. 


65 Years 
and Over. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 




4 


3 


2 


i 


S 


13 


58 


36 


96 


21 


30 


I 






2 


2 




26 


73 


46 


97 


U 


32 


i 


i 




I 


3 


3 


20 


68 


44 


109 


16 


49 


i 


i 






I 


I 


21 


76 


37 


in 


18 


37 






I 


2 


I 


4 


23 


72 


70 


122 


15 


45 




i 




3 




2 


22 


79 


56 


127 


15 


30 


2 


3 


I 




3 


3 


23 


98 


61 


I3i 


24 


43 


3 


2 


I 




S 


6 


38 


93 


68 


142 


23 


44 


3 




4 


I 


S 


S 


23 


92 


63 


149 


26 


45 






2 


I 


3 


4 


25 


84 


81 


149 


36 


39 


i 


2 




I 


5 


5 


31 


86 


90 


149 


25 


64 


I 




2 


I 


5 


6 


33 


102 


77 


163 


35 


70 


2 




I 


I 


3 


2 


37 


102 


104 


209 


35 


74 


2 




2 


I 


4 


5 


39 


106 


102 


184 


44 


83 


4 


2 


3 




4 


4 


45 


119 


117 


235 


46 


80 


2 


S 


I 


I 


7 


4 


49 


127 


129 


239 


56 


86 


3 


2 


2 




10 


S 


58 


141 


137 


235 


55 


84 


3 


2 


3 


2 


4 


S 


36 


144 


128 


219 


47 


85 


2 


3 




I 


7 


3 


46 


124 


152 


237 


56 


100 


2 


2 




s 


4 


2 


45 


146 


124 


287 


53 


84 


4 


4 


i 


2 


4 


9 


53 


136 


145 


262 


50 


109 


I 




I 


3 


10 


6 


63 


148 


137 


309 


66 


88 


2 


2 


I 


I 


I 


9 


57 


160 


157 


304 


66 


no 


2 




4 


I 


4 


8 


52 


164 


149 


297 


65 


102 


4 


3 


3 


I 


6 


7 


70 


171 


186 


298 


87 


118 


3 




4 


4 


2 


9 


70 


148 


172 


306 


67 


117 


3 


4 


6 




8 


6 


6o 


177 


197 


337 


82 


Il6 


S 


4 


I 


4 


3 


4 


87 


152 


191 


319 


96 


127 


4 


3 


2 


4 


5 


5 


65 


158 


208 


345 


78 


145 


6 


7 


2 


5 


4 


7 


65 


164 


216 


316 


98 


140 


4 


6 


I 


2 


7 


9 


93 


168 


238 


350 


106 


157 


S 


2 


I 


2 


8 


S 


83 


160 


266 


407 


ill 


167 




7 


6 




6 


II 


90 


198 


290 


389 


105 


158 


S 


2 


2 


6 


9 


9 


8i 


200 


283 


428 


129 


167 


3 


3 


8 


I 


17 


9 


93 


222 


305 


465 


132 


215 


7 


4 


4 




II 


IS 


129 


241 


336 


487 


142 


199 


6 


8 


S 


3 


9 


II 


122 


225 


325 


491 


123 


208 


7 


5 


6 


3 


9 


12 


118 


237 


343 


551 


172 


220 


8 


12 


3 


4 


II 


13 


126 


249 


405 


519 


157 


233 


4 


S 


5 


5 


18 


10 


143 


266 


385 


544 


213 


236 


4 


6 


9 


2 


16 


IS 


135 


245 


399 


598 


203 


224 


13 


4 


8 


6 


14 


13 


141 


283 


459 


646 


204 


241 


6 


8 


7 


6 


20 


14 


156 


295 


432 


617 


206 


253 


8 


ir 


7 


3 


II 


12 


151 


273 


474 


634 


269 


270 


9 


S 


4 


4 


27 


II 


142 


312 


525 


642 


275 


282 


3 


7 


2 


7 


21 


19 


147 


313 


S63 


710 


272 


312 


7 

: 


3 


5 


6 


21 


19 


166 


331 


560 


755 


291 


333 



215 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Bronchitis in Former 



Year. 



1866 
1867 
1868 
1869, 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
189S 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 



Total. 



Male. 



301 
375 
403 
46S 
413 
492 
504 
S2S 
533 
585 
629 
462 
610 
593 
704 
778 
787 
763 
723 
801 
872 
926 
955 
908 
965 
924 
930 
756 
675 
790 
656 
537 
553 
582 
545 
433 
498 
413 
505 
411 
346 
224 
167 
280 
232 
188 
167 



Female. 



256 
320 
400 
412 
442 
472 
536 
543 
532 
526 
585 
571 
574 
670 
671 
733 
796 
672 
762 
804 
829 
912 
937 
906 

1,022 
912 

824 
821 
654 
846 
636 

552 
574 
550 
548 
501 
522 
446 
539 
453 
374 
211 
157 
274 
225 
202 
167 



Under 1 Year. 



Male. 



163 
184 
186 
231 
243 
259 
269 
295 
278 
307 
331 
238 
334 
305 
352 
404 
426 
386 
377 
388 
413 
453 
518 
459 
498 
494 
500 
425 
358 
461 
398 
328 
327 
377 
298 
262 
320 
222 
283 
251 
219 
135 
119 
185 
141 
125 
116 



Female. 



123 
140 
176 
155 
186 
238 
234 
258 
238 
233 
241 
234 
268 
292 
283 
311 
344 
279 
304 
327 
324 
361 
398 
362 
447 
403 
385 
408 
307 
406 
323 
258 
283 
279 
261 
244 
280 
206 

250 

229 

181 

102 
89 
175 
127 
120 
107 



I Year 

and Under 

2 Years. 



Male. 



46 
81 
63 
7i 
52 
79 
75 
79 
68 
97 
89 
64 
97 
75 
84 
108 
no 
100 
99 
129 

122 

114 

102 

137 

145 

147 

138 

106 

141 

124 

102 

83 

94 

90 

96 

69 

68 

77 

95 

72 

54 

35 

IS 

45 

34 

27 

17 



Female. 



29 
53 
58 
76 
60 
67 
89 
75 
71 
54 
7i 
61 
67 
73 
93 
103 
123 
96 
IOI 

92 

112 
102 

115 

120 

154 

122 

139 

108 

99 

158 

117 

87 

92 

82 

81 

81 

74 

84 

97 

65 

71 

27 

13 

38 

20 
22 



2 Years 

and Under 

5 Years. 



Male. 



34 
36 
56 
3i 
35 
41 
33 
41 
45 
44 
30 
49 
42 
46 
68 
61 
49 
41 
52 
77 
63 
49 
62 
78 
59 
78 
62 
61 
63 
55 
40 
29 
38 
45 
34 
34 
34 
39 
26 
IS 
7 
7 
13 
12 
S 
14 



Female. 



24 
25 
45 
48 
44 
44 
36 
42 
47 
44 
44 
39 
42 
43 
48 
69 
80 
37 
40 
47 
68 
79 
63 
56 
65 
67 
64 
65 
62 
65 
57 
44 
36 
45 
45 
38 
46 
32 
44 
26 
24 
7 



2l6 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



City of New York, by Age and Sex. 



Total Under 
5 Years. 


5 Years 
and Under 
15 Years. 


.15 Years 
and Under 
25 Years. 


25 Years 
and Under 
45 Years. 


45 Years 
and Under 
65 Years. 


1 

65 Years 
and Over. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


227 


176 


6 


9 


2 


2 


13 


20 


27 


20 


26 


29 


299 


218 


8 


6 


3 


6 


23 


23 


25 


25 


17 


42 


28s 


279 


10 


10 


5 


1 


28 


18 


33 


39 


42 


S3 


358 


279 


7 


n 


1 


1 


22 


16 


39 


29 


38 


76 


326 


290 


7 


11 


4 


5 


12 


21 


29 


33 


35 


82 


373 


349 


12 


6 


3 


5 


15 


12 


30 


36 


59 


64 


335 


359 


5 


13 


2 


4 


20 


18 


40 


44 


52 


98 


407 


375 


8 


n 


4 


6 


19 


16 


34 


38 


53 


97 


387 


356 


5 


10 


1 


5 


28 


16 


50 


37 


62 


108 


449 


331 


6 


9 


1 


1 


16 


19 


48 


44 


65 


122 


464 


356 


8 


8 


2 


4 


15 


16 


47 


53 


93 


148 


332 


334 


11 


9 


1 


1 


22 


24 


36 


49 


60 


154 


480 


377 


10 


10 


1 


3 


20 


iS 


37 


54 


62 


112 


422 


408 


13 


12 


3 


2 


18 


24 


53 


49 


84 


175 


482 


424 


12 


n 


7 


2 


3i 


3i 


68 


69 


104 


134 


580 


483 


17 


15 


7 


4 


27 


23 


46 


73 


101 


135 


597 


547 


11 


15 


4 


6 


23 


20 


62 


60 


90 


I48 


535 


412 


13 


6 


5 


4 


30 


28 


59 


82 


121 


140 


517 


445 


10 


19 


8 


6 


27 


29 


64 


97 


97 


166 


569 


466 


n 


n 


8 


16 


38 


28 


71 


78 


104 


205 


612 


504 


14 


9 


8 


9 


53 


43 


81 


91 


104 


173 


630 


542 


12 


21 


IS 


15 


48 


47 


99 


no 


122 


177 


669 


576 


14 


13 


13 


8 


36 


47 


106 


101 


117 


192 


658 


538 


13 


11 


15 


23 


46 


50 


73 


114 


103 


170 


721 


666 


19 


14 


n 


16 


49 


S3 


86 


118 


79 


155 


700 


592 


15 


17 


8 


9 


46 


39 


74 


in 


81 


144 


716 


588 


17 


12 


12 


10 


50 


42 


70 


79 


65 


93 


593 


581 


7 


13 


7 


14 


44 


35 


54 


75 


51 


103 


560 


468 


7 


15 


7 


II 


16 


27 


40 


53 


45 


80 


648 


629 


11 


15 


5 


3 


26 


20 


47 


74 


53 


105 


555 


497 


10 


9 


5 


4 


17 


14 


37 


49 


32 


63 


451 


389 


6 


16 


1 


4 


13 


15 


30 


45 


36 


83 


450 


411 


7 


14 


3 


5 


12 


24 


37 


41 


44 


79 


505 


406 


9 


18 


5 


4 


6 


19 


28 


46 


29 


57 


439 


387 


8 


13 


7 


6 


20 


16 


26 


39 


45 


87 


365 


363 


8 


5 


5 


8 


IS 


13 


13 


33 


27 


79 


422 


400 


5 


4 


5 


3 


13 


10 


25 


29 


28 


76 


333 


322 


6 


8 


1 


5 


5 


IS 


33 


33 


35 


63 


417 


391 


6 


10 


2 


2 


11 


14 


34 


34 


35 


88 


349 


320 


4 


15 


2 


4 


3 


4 


20 


32 


33 


78 


288 


276 


2 


2 


1 


3 


6 


3 


13 


26 


36 


64 


177 


136 


4 


2 


2 




4 


3 


2 


8 


35 


62 


141 


no 


4 


1 


2 


2 


1 


2 


4 


9 


15 


33 


243 


224 




3 


2 




3 


I 


8 


12 


24 


34 


187 


164 


1 


I 


2 




S 


I 


8 


9 


29 


50 


157 


155 


1 


2 




2 


1 


2 


4 


8 


25 


33 


147 


131 


3 


4 






S 


2 


2 


7 


10 


23 



2T7 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Pneumonia in Former 



Year. 



Total. 



Male. 



Female. 



Under I Year. 



Male. 



Female. 



i Year 

and Under 

2 Years. 



Male. Female. 



2 Years 

and Under 
5 Years. 



Male. 



Female. 



1866. 
1867 
1868. 
1869 
1870. 
1871, 
1872, 
1873 
1874 
187s. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880, 
1881, 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
188s. 
1886, 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 



764 
773 
870 
1,144 
1,046 
1,022 
1,238 
1.357 
1,335 
1.558 
1.359 
1,171 
1,204 
1,411 
I.5S2 
1,836 
1,976 
1,947 
1,767 
2,043 
2,063 
2. 059 
2,422 
2,306 
2,759 
3.258 
3,363 
3.692 
2,712 
3,146 
3,046 
2,585 
2,861 
2,936 
3.715 
3.137 
3,081 
3,437 
4,629 
3.395 
3.705 
4,119 
3.206 
3.418 
3.355 
3.299 
3.278 



624 
661 
798 
956 
790 
812 
912 
971 
1,063 
1,244 
1,183 
977 
1,084 
1. 143 
1,270 
1.425 
1,496 
1,462 
1.392 
1,607 
1.593 
1,648 
1,866 
1,769 
2,230 
2,560 
2,478 
2,795 
2,013 
2,605 
2,337 
2,036 
2,440 
2,482 
3,032 
2,655 
2,760 
2,871 
3.400 
2.744 
2.977 
3.219 
2,662 
2,956 
2,810 
2,689 
2,609 



219 
270 
303 
318 
295 
251 
320 
367 
356 
356 
352 
292 
310 
351 
370 
400 
441 
370 
378 
398 
456 
448 
480 
502 
552 
739 
730 
721 
660 
802 
802 
736 
759 
800 
953 
783 
930 
841 
877 
866 
1,000 
1,009 
910 
992 
899 
886 
923 



194 
182 
263 

302 
225 
228 
221 
295 
277 
299 
294 
268 
280 
239 
293 
307 
329 
305 
328 
323 
353 
352 
435 
422 
435 
504 
598 
591 
496 
609 
620 
595 
607 
637 
689 
631 
756 
696 
763 
679 
851 
868 
756 
849 
695 
753 
742 



102 
112 
127 
168 
146 
153 
171 
170 
167 
201 
194 
16s 
200 
161 
184 
232 
250 
210 
216 
252 
259 
232 
286 
266 
310 
384 
440 
37i 
356 
484 
-"-45 
386 
428 
441 
544 
432 
502 
462 
560 
469 
577 
543 
445 
488 
440 
480 
472 



87 
119 
144 
152 
118 
116 
122 
123 
135 
181 
16S 
125 
179 
161 
188 
203 
210 
175 
215 
196 
193 
198 
232 
230 
325 
343 
362 
323 
286 
433 
370 
307 
406 
398 
491 
441 
5io 
405 
496 
423 
487 
461 
390 
506 
408 
388 
382 



75 
79 
78 
146 
86 
102 
124 
100 

92 
106 

141 
103 
139 

126 

150 
191 

192 
146 

161 

170 
148 
169 

218 

187 

207 

287 
274 

261 
243 
272 

259 
236 
259 
256 
327 
242 

258 
257 
299 
248 
272 
303 
230 
270 
209 

225 
219 



218 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



New York City, by Age and Sex. 



! = 

Total Under 
5 Years. 


5 Years 
and Under 
15 Years. 


15 Years 
and Under 
25 Years. 


25 Years 
and Under 
45 Years. 


45 Years 
and Under 
65 Years. 


65 Years 
and Over. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


396 


343 


19 


17 


47 


41 


123 


87 


126 


79 


53 


57 


461 


386 


33 


24 


37 


30 


95 


80 


109 


77 


38 


64 


508 


496 


26 


27 


29 


48 


139 


93 


121 


80 


47 


54 


632 


58i 


64 


39 


48 


30 


164 


116 


181 


97 


55 


93 


527 


412 


31 


26 


44 


33 


183 


137 


183 


100 


78 


82 


506 


446 


28 


39 


35 


32 


183 


106 


177 


105 


93 


84 


6lS 


443 


37 


57 


54 


31 


224 


131 


221 


142 


87 


108 


637 


5i8 


41 


42 


72 


44 


277 


139 


228 


127 


102 


ior 


615 


517 


44 


45 


58 


42 


252 


151 


263 


165 


103 


143 


663 


597 


46 


42 


65 


56 


334 


179 


319 


177 


131 


193 


6S7 


576 


57 


43 


5i 


58 


234 


177 


229 


168 


101 


161 


560 


484 


4i 


38 


59 


49 


206 


128 


209 


160 


96 


118 


649 


585 


43 


42 


46 


35 


170 


133 


192 


149 


104 


140 


638 


520 


56 


51 


69 


42 


261 


163 


246 


194 


141 


173 


704 


607 


53 


59 


77 


52 


293 


188 


289 


211 


136 


153 


823 


667 


67 


72 


77 


53 


360 


213 


357 


227 


152 


193 


883 


707 


61 


69 


114 


61 


429 


219 


322 


261 


167 


179 


726 


623 


66 


73 


112 


74 


448 


243 


438 


251 


157 


198 


755 


667 


61 


66 


82 


67 


388 


209 


338 


234 


143 


149 


820 


683 


51 


57 


123 


82 


454 


277 


396 


315 


199 


193 


863 


696 


66 


70 


126 


79 


463 


256 


389 


268 


156 


224 


849 


727 


6r 


69 


119 


81 


472 


268 


377 


283 


181 


220 


984 


844 


87 


81 


ISO 


76 


537 


305 


481 


334 


183 


226 


955 


812 


82 


59 


136 


114 


581 


279 


406 


313 


146 


192 


1,069 


969 


84 


69 


183 


127 


720 


416 


516 


393 


187 


256 


1,410 


1,096 


121 


84 


182 


137 


719 


416 


552 


484 


274 


343 


1,444 


1,203 


113 


102 


191 


122 


816 


3/8 


570 


407 


229 


266 


1.353 


1. 157 


99 


106 


233 


145 


985 


48s 


769 


557 


253 


345 


1.259 


987 


72 


78 


139 


100 


601 


319 


435 


318 


206 


211 


1,558 


1,310 


93 


97 


163 


124 


638 


367 


463 


383 


231 


324 


1.506 


1,236 


82 


79 


147 


91 


594 


301 


508 


368 


209 


262 


1.358 


1,069 


70 


73 


108 


90 


482 


259 


374 


275 


193 


270 


1.446 


1,242 


76 


95 


118 


97 


562 


349 


415 


380 


244 


277 


1,497 


1,294 


77 


80 


122 


US 


536 


312 


463 


366 


241 


315 


1.824 


1.503 


100 


128 


180 


120 


693 


3S4 


604 


499 


3U 


398 


1.457 


1,308 


93 


93 


122 


US 


650 


373 


541 


431 


274 


335 


1.690 


1,556 


90 


US 


102 


113 


487 


323 


470 


336 


242 


317 


I.560 


1,360 


99 


106 


137 


93 


631 


377 


657 


5i6 


353 


419 


1,736 


1.504 


122 


U4 


167 


108 


1,095 


428 


1,038 


668 


471 


548 


1,583 


1.316 


86 


89 


123 


91 


674 


308 


622 


514 


307 ' 


426 


1,849 


1. 571 


88 


73 


122 


72 


653 


345 


655 


462 


338 


454 


1,855 


1.594 


9i 


74 


145 


83 


787 


358 


813 


551 


428 


559 


1.S85 


1,350 


68 


88 


113 


71 


50- 


306 


612 


448 


321 


399 


1.750 


1,596 


88 


79 


97 


79 


532 


288 


570 


450 


38l 


464 


1.548 


1,339 


70 


68 


106 


83 


544 


300 


654 


515 


433 


505 


1,591 


1.338 


68 


74 


85 


60 


520 


288 


659 


461 


3/6 


468 


1,614 


1,316 


65 


53 


109 


83 


564 


309 


595 


432 


331 


416 



219 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Bright's Disease in Former 



Year. 



Total. 



Male. 



Female. 



Under I Year. 



Male. 



Female. 



i Year 

and Under 

2 Years. 



Male. 



Female. 



2 Years 

and Under 

5 Years. 



Male. 



Female. 



1866. 
1867. 
1868. 
1869. 
1870. 
1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874. 
1875. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888 
1889, 
1890, 
1891 
1892, 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
191 1 
1912 



242 


170 


225 


178 


301 


233 


330 


227 


432 


355 


501 


446 


523 


426 


431 


445 


429 


399 


461 


448 


516 


442 


493 


430 


499 


420 


526 


501 


5-10 


489 


655 


532 


640 


601 


661 


534 


609 


554 


658 


530 


627 


583 


58i 


547 


S85 


562 


969 


794 


1,089 


935 


1,153 


963 


1,078 


913 


1,140 


93i 


1,023 


856 


1,082 


937 


1,173 


1,022 


1,054 


1,005 


1,304 


1,122 


1,496 


l,2U 


1,521 


1.403 


1,601 


1,350 


1,542 


1,272 


1,522 


1,296 


1,665 


I,48l 


1,690 


1,485 


1,811 


1,421 


1,626 


1.305 


1.453 


1,141 


1,613 


1,402 


1.639 


1,399 


1,580 


1,294 


1,730 


1,514 



14 
13 
16 

7 
6 
6 
5 
6 
9 
15 
10 
6 
9 
10 
6 
9 
6 
4 
4 



10 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



New York City, by Age and Sex. 







5 Years 
and Under 
15 Years. 


IS Years 


25 Years 


45 Years 




Total Under 
S Years. 


and Under 
25 Years. 


and Under 
45 Years. 


and Under 
65 Years. 


65 Years 
and Over. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


15 


9 


14 


ii 


23 


26 


94 


53 


76 


47 


20 


24 


8 


I 


II 


6 


18 


29 


84 


87 


86 


44 


18 


11 


14 


12 


8 


10 


25 


25 


122 


100 


89 


56 


43 


30 


19 


II 


21 


19 


25 


31 


117 


7i 


112 


66 


36 


29 


20 


10 


14 


5 


39 


43 


144 


139 


150 


115 


65 


43 


21 


6 


14 


14 


29 


33 


180 


188 


184 


159 


73 


46 


13 


8 


16 


21 


36 


35 


201 


168 


185 


140 


72 


54 


8 


12 


13 


9 


27 


36 


158 


182 


173 


149 


52 


57 


10 


12 


12 


ii 


18 


36 


I46 


163 


185 


113 


58 


64 


7 


9 


7 


9 


27 


42 


166 


175 


193 


152 


61 


61 


8 


7 


16 


9 


27 


31 


183 


165 


203 


171 


79 


59 


13 


5 


18 


15 


22 


3i 


173 


166 


194 


142 


73 


71 


19 


5 


17 


14 


29 


37 


158 


130 


196 


157 


80 


77 


14 


9 


14 


14 


36 


35 


I8l 


185 


208 


183 


73 


75 


10 


I 


15 


10 


24 


28 


179 


180 


233 


186 


79 


84 


17 


5 


15 


13 


31 


28 


204 


179 


275 


208 


113 


99 


13 


17 


12 


12 


28 


4i 


230 


204 


259 


218 


98 


109 


12 


6 


14 


16 


28 


28 


229 


172 


266 


211 


112 


101 


15 


12 


14 


12 


23 


44 


190 


175 


259 


210 


108 


101 


II 


7 


14 


12 


26 


45 


197 


159 


278 


220 


132 


87 


9 


9 


6 


8 


27 


24 


191 


175 


266 


229 


128 


138 


7 


9 


13 


8 


28 


27 


182 


187 


227 


204 


124 


112 


13 


12 


18 


14 


33 


41 


171 


178 


244 


222 


to6 


95 


18 


8 


ii 


13 


36 


49 


313 


241 


408 


305 


183 


178 


10 


9 


10 


6 


34 


57 


366 


269 


450 


391 


219 


203 


19 


II 


14 


20 


49 


38 


388 


318 


468 


371 


215 


205 


18 


12 


23 


16 


39 


6i 


349 


3io 


460 


352 


189 


162 


II 


7 


13 


17 


44 


40 


373 


280 


463 


397 


236 


190 


12 


5 


18 


15 


46 


47 


305 


275 


438 


337 


204 


177 


4 


II 


8 


5 


30 


35 


290 


248 


493 


401 


257 


237 


9 


9 


8 


12 


35 


39 


308 


270 


513 


406 


300 


286 


7 


6 


9 


12 


38 


49 


268 


239 


454 


412 


278 


287 


9 


4 


4 


15 


47 


44 


323 


289 


579 


464 


342 


306 


16 


7 


U 


22 


44 


49 


393 


334 


654 


538 


375 


293 


29 


16 


9 


21 


44 


45 


416 


388 


678 


58l 


345 


352 


47 


31 


26 


20 


43 


47 


464 


362 


653 


508 


368 


382 


34 


19 


15 


17 


45 


51 


446 


316 


666 


554 


336 


315 


II 


7 


15 


18 


40 


40 


386 


332 


651 


547 


419 


352 


8 


II 


5 


15 


47 


50 


413 


368 


749 


609 


443 


428 


4 


6 


10 


10 


40 


38 


38 1 


340 


744 


615 


511 


476 


5 


i 


7 


II 


39 


46 


466 


372 


802 


547 


492 


444 


8 


6 


10 


10 


37 


33 


402 


327 


737 


514 


432 


415 


II 


5 


II 


13 


31 


31 


338 


260 


681 


501 


381 


331 


45 


33 


19 


18 


43 


40 


382 


320 


714 


534 


410 


457 


3i 


29 


27 


19 


43 


39 


36l 


304 


732 


588 


445 


420 


30 


45 


15 


15 


49 


32 


381 


304 


683 


509 


422 


389 


34 


31 


22 


18 


42 


32 


362 


302 


748 


602 


522 


529 
1 



221 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Effects of Heat in Former 



Year. 



Total. 



Male. 



Female. 



Under I Year. 



Male. 



Female. 



i Year 

and Under 

2 Years. 



Male. 



Female. 



2 Years 

and Under 

5 Years. 



Male. 



Female. 



1 866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
187S 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
191 1 
1912 



221 
4 

159 
24 

181 
17 

220 
25 
15 
11 

135 
16 
40 
34 
78 

108 
78 
60 
75 

108 
31 

173 
66 
24 
47 
78 

226 
32 
89 
53 

549 
30 

270 
55 

140 

506 
15 
41 
13 

100 
42 
22 
44 
45 
47 

238 
26 



8g 



57 

4 

100 

9 

4 

8 

5i 

5 

12 

7 

38 

26 

25 

23 

32 

38 

II 

43 

30 

8 

15 

17 

94 

11 

26 

32 

216 

9 

118 

40 

65 

392 

10 

35 

9 

51 

33 

13 

35 

34 

30 

143 

15 



9 

5 

1 

13 

9 

3 

4 

9 

17 

7 

31 

16 

14 

67 

I 

6 

3 



5 
4 
6 
9 
2 
4 
9 

13 
1 

32 
9 

22 

38 
3 

II 
3 

13 
7 
2 
9 
3 
7 

15 



16 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



New York City, by Age and Sex. 



Total 


Under 


5 Years 

and Under 


IS Years 
and Under 


25 Years 
and Under 


45 Years 
and Under 


• — 1 

65 Years 


S Years. 


IS Years. 


25 Years. 


45 Years. 


65 Years. 


and Over. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


I 


2 


I 




24 
I 


12 


139 

I 


50 
1 


48 
1 


18 


9 


7 




7 


i 




23 


4 


99 


18 


34 


6 


2 


2 


I 




i 


i 


2 




16 


1 


4 








ii 


5 


2 




15 


6 


99 


29 


50 


11 


4 


6 


i 


2 


I 




I 




9 


1 


4 


1 


1 




17 


9 


6 


3 


16 


ii 


118 


49 


59 


18 


4 


10 


6 


6 


I 




5 


i 


10 


1 


3 


1 






i 








I 


i 


8 


2 


5 






1 


i 


3 


i 


I 




i 


4 


2 


3 




2 


1 


17 


4 


i 


4 


5 


6 


99 


16 


28 


13 


5 


8 


2 


3 


2 




I 


i 


4 




5 




2 


1 


7 


5 


2 




2 




18 


3 


8 


2 


3 


2 


3 


2 


4 








20 


2 


6 


2 


1 


1 


15 


12 


2 


2 


8 


5 


38 


5 


12 


11 


3 


3 


14 


9 


.3 


2 


12 




52 


4 


24 


6 


3 


5 


8 


13 


1 




7 


3 


44 


4 


16 


4 


2 


1 


8 


9 


I 


I 


5 


5 


3i 


3 


11 


3 


4 


2 


II 


7 


2 




8 


2 


36 


9 


17 


5 


1 


9 


13 


6 


2 


2 


4 


2 


6o 


II 


26 


11 


3 


6 


2 


3 


I 


I 


4 


I 


14 


I 


9 


4 


1 


1 


16 


14 


2 




14 


4 


105 


10 


33 


11 


3 


4 


13 


12 


I 


3 


5 


i 


31 


4 


II 


5 


5 


5 


7 


7 


2 




2 




7 




4 


1 


2 




2 


8 






5 




27 


2 


8 


5 


5 




14 


7 


3 




7 


2 


34 


2 


15 


3 


5 


3 


IS 


II 


2 


I 


II 


8 


106 


32 


85 


35 


7 


7 


4 


5 


2 




3 


i 


14 


3 


8 


2 


1 




6 


8 


I 


4 


9 


3 


59 


4 


12 


6 


2 


1 


15 


14 






4 


i 


16 


6 


16 


7 


2 


4 


22 


18 


4 




20 


9 


301 


58 


174 


87 


28 


44 


II 


3 


2 




2 


2 


II 


2 


4 


2 






37 


42 


I 


I 


5 


3 


141 


22 


68 


32 


18 


18 


20 


14 


2 


3 


4 




16 


7 


6 


10 


7 


6 


17 


31 


3 




9 


3 


66 


3 


32 


21 


13 


7 


90 


63 


2 


II 


10 


9 


176 


66 


163 


135 


65 


108 


I 


4 




I 


I 




10 




1 




2 


5 


9 


16 


I 


2 


2 




7 


4 


16 


7 


6 


6 


4 


3 


I 




I 




7 


1 




4 




1 


27 


16 


3 


I 


5 


3 


29 


8 


25 


9 


11 


U 


II 


8 




I 


I 


2 


18 


5 


12 


6 




11 


7 


2 


i 




I 


2 


5 


2 


2 


4 


6 


3 


I 


II 




I 


2 




14 




22 


10 


5 


13 


14 


8 






I 


2 


13 


3 


11 


16 


6 


5 


5 


9 


i 




3 


2 


15 


6 


13 


4 


10 


9 


22 


18 


3 


r 


4 


2 


9i 


22 


76 


53 


42 


47 


3 


I 






I 


.... 


8 


I 


10 


8 


4 


5 



223 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Suicide in Former New York City, by Age and Sex. 



Year. 



1866. 
1867. 
1868. 
1869. 
1870. 
1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874- 
1875. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 



1883. 



1885. 



1887. 



1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893 • 
1894- 
189S. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899- 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 



Total. 



Male. Female. 



40 
63 
69 
76 
79 
85 

III 
82 

140 

123 

114 

123 

116 

100 

120 

133 

161 

134 

189 

167 

172 

183 
202 
200 

190 

239 

202 

256 

268 

286 

295 

322 

337 

3IS 

382 

327 

354 

384 ' 

417 

331 

336 

346 

500 

441 

392 

380 

406 



5 Years 
and Under 
15 Years. 



Male. 



14 

19 

29 

26 

22 

29 

33 

36 

40 

32 

36 

25 

26 

17 

32 

33 

38 

27 

40 

40 

SI 

52 

45 

44 

49 

61 

39 

58 

63 

90 

89 

114 

126 

118 

118 

143 

123 

137 

ISO 

91 

106 

96 

144 

131 

131 

116 

125 



Female. 



15 Years 
and Under 
25 Years. 



Male. 



9 
16 
15 
17 
26 
13 
23 



24 
17 
28 
23 
23 
31 
20 
40 
30 
32 
38 
39 
30 
42 
38 
36 
44 
63 
47 
57 
49 
39 



Female 



30 
41 
32 
34 
30 
26 
27 
36 
18 
15 
17 
26 
24 
32 

23 



25 Years 
and Under 
45 Years. 



Male. 



37 
35 
34 
39 
40 
56 
54 
77 
60 
52 
62 
S3 
53 
58 
78 
75 
27 
94 
74 
82 
94 



100 
116 
100 
120 
136 
128 
136 
I48 
164 

156 
196 
158 
177 
192 
205 
161 
155 
155 
228 
195 
163 
178 



Female 



IS 

19 
11 
13 
19 

17 

17 



18 
32 
29 
18 
27 
35 
49 
47 
72 
55 
56 
60 
73 
60 
78 
77 
49 
52 
49 
77 
68 
54 
55 



45 Years 
and Under 
65 Years. 



Male. 



14 

25 

3i 

29 

26 

30 

13 

47 

45 

48 

32 

49 

31 

38 

37 

57 

70 

57 

60 

64 

50 

80 

71 

62 

84 

70 

84 

90 

US 

105 

127 

107 

104 

128 

106 

108 

140 

141 

107 

119 

122 

171 

166 

141 

127 

154 



Female. 



23 

19 
30 
30 
23 
30 
22 
36 
24 
31 
20 

34 
29 
28 



65 Years 
and Over. 



Male. 



7 
13 
16 
12 
16 

7 
15 
IS 
24 
19 



27 
25 
24 
26 
25 
30 
22 
29 
25 
25 
25 
38 
33 
3i 
26 
24 



224 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Deaths from Typhoid Fever, Former New York City, by Months* 



Year. 



a 

a 
a 

t-1 


2 

XI 
a 


i 

3 


< 


3 


a 
I 


i— > 


4J 

1 

a 
< 


u 
9 

XI 

S 
B 

a 

a) 
CO 


18 


13 


IS 


IS 


14 


8 


16 


28 


29 


18 


IS 


26 


21 


21 


21 


34 


57 


51 


22 


IS 


19 


14 


26 


16 


16 


43 


48. 


24 


16 


24 


16 


10 


16 


13 


25 


32 


26 


16 


19 


23 


19 


18 


22 


40 


68 


21 


19 


16 


20 


18 


16 


21 


35 


41 


14 


21 


6 


8 


26 


12 


16 


33 


43 


14 


13 


6 


9 


13 


7 


20 


38 


35 


18 


10 


7 


II 


9 


9 


10 


30 


18 


10 


17 


17 


16 


12 


14 


23 


22 


32 


17 


10 


27 


38 


30 


18 


33 


42 


72 


23 


18 


20 


17 


18 


10 


29 


44 


50 


19 


18 


24 


22 


IS 


22 


31 


63 


79 


16 


22 


16 


10 


16 


18 


25 


49 


62 


16 


II 


10 


14 


16 


17 


19 


32 


49 


12 


9 


28 


13 


9 


5 


22 


37 


55 


28 


13 


21 


II 


II 


16 


33 


51 


S3 


12 


13 


14 


17 


17 


II 


35 


42 


81 


27 


15 


21 


18 


17 


19 


31 


71 


57 


20 


28 


14 


12 


11 


II 


31 


49 


64 


14 


II 


17 


13 


20 


23 


28 


57 


65 


IS 


25 


17 


19 


23 


23 


52 


53 


57 


22 


18 


29 


25 


29 


23 


21 


35 


42 


22 


II 


17 


18 


II 


14 


28 


42 


57 


17 


16 


8 


14 


13 


23 


27 


37 


46 


20 


17 


11 


12 


10 


13 


25 


42 


38 


19 


15 


9 


10 


14 


19 


29 


40 


32 


8 


12 


14 


8 


11 


19 


20 


56 


96 


IS 


9 


14 


IS 


18 


II 


21 


30 


40 


27 


19 


10 


10 


18 


20 


30 


37 


56 


41 


19 


21 


22 


18 


14 


3i 


40 


64 


24 


10 


17 


22 


18 


20 


32 


47 


42 


25 


16 


19 


23 


23 


22 


23 


39 


43 


16 


IS 


21 


12 


18 


17 


21 


41 


37 


19 


IS 


17 


15 


11 


16 


2S 


43 


49 


13 


21 


8 


25 


17 


16 


27 


39 


46 


19 


30 


28 


48 


40 


21 


23 


38 


49 


II 


10 


14 


21 


20 


12 


24 


39 


48 


19 


17 


14 


II 


19 


23 


19 


34 


58 


17 


16 


22 


10 


11 


22 


27 


31 


44 


13 


8 


10 


11 


14 


24 


35 


55 


49 


17 


15 


14 


7 


11 


14 


22 


23 


29 



Total. 



1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
187s 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
189s 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
190 1 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 



33 

30 
25 
33 
42 
29 
32 
40 
28 
30 
59 
70 
90 
66 
SO 
59 
38 
52 
57 
49 
56 
55 
70 
46 
48 
39 
40 
59 
52 
52 
64 
70 
48 
39 
44 
64 
54 
39 
48 
47 
30 
32 



24 
40 
29 
39 
34 
28 
35 
25 
59 
29 
53 
38 
66 
54 
34 
43 
26 
37 
40 
34 
Si 
3i 
41 
32 
37 
34 
28 
42 
43 
42 
39 
55 
35 
30 
28 
55 
41 
30 
41 
34 
27 
19 



26 
10 



19 

29 
25 
19 
19 
47 
25 
22 

35 

26 

33 
22 

33 

24 
29 
29 
30 
26 
28 
36 
36 

44 
31 
26 
51 
39 
42 
34 
42 
28 
38 
29 
23 
22 
29 
19 
15 



239 
364 
294 
275 
347 
283 
275 
245 
178 
241 
446 
362 
471 
389 
294 
325 
323 
364 
397 
352 
384 
400 
381 
326 
322 
297 
299 
376 
294 
372 
412 
399 
350 
309 
3io 
369 
420 
291 
325 
310 
295 
21S 



* Exclusive of typho-malarial fever, excepting 1888 to 1905, when it was included. 



225 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Malarial Fevers, Former New York City, by Months. 



Year. 



a 

< 




56 


52 


49 


39 


41 


52 


18 , 


31 


33 


36 


37 


43 


23 


22 


24 


22 


19 


10 


8 


15 


11 


II 


11 


12 


11 


8 


10 


15 


8 


9 


9 


10 


8 


12 


8 


12 


7 


6 


7 


12 


5 


2 


4 


5 


1 


10 


4 


7 


2 




3 


3 




1 




1 




1 


1 


3 



1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
188s. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889, 
1890, 
1891 
1892 

1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 



26 
36 

22 

27 
24 
26 
25 
23 

21 
17 
14 



35 

28 
37 
37 
39 
34 



10 
7 
3 
2 
5 
6 
5 
6 
5 
5 
5 



64 
34 
54 
25 
37 
37 
25 
23 
11 
9 
13 
15 
17 



33 

28 

31 

23 

37 

25 

32 

18 

15 

20 

19 

16 

13 

18 

9 

II 

17 

7 

6 

5 

6 

9 

7 

5 

3 



50 

45 
70 
37 
34 
19 
32 



19 
17 



5 
9 

16 
5 

14 
9 
5 

10 
3 
4 
5 
6 



59 

63 
63 
44 
41 
33 
36 
21 
35 
23 
23 



76 
81 
44 
34 
41 
29 
43 
29 
26 
16 
25 



66 
56 
50 
57 
35 
44 
33 
20 
30 
15 
21 
13 
7 



18 

14 
10 
16 
13 
9 
3 
3 

5 
3 



48 
44 
39 
39 
24 
35 
25 
26 
19 
12 
13 
16 



40 
37 
22 
23 
27 
32 
30 
20 
16 
19 



5 
7 
3 

10 



In this table typho-malarial fever is included, excepting in 1888 to 1906, during which years it is included 
in tables of typhoid fever. 



226 



Year. 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Deaths from Measles, Former New York City, by Months. 



Total. 



1871. 
1872. 
1873- 
1874- 
1875. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894- 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905- 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 



108 
13 

25 

28 

8 
42 

4 
36 

100 

18 

140 

60 
36 

ISO 

5 

293 

26 
117 

24 
105 

SO 

38 
105 

26 

93 
25 
71 
33 
79 
7 
87 
28 
65 
17 
51 
12 
74 
33 
30 
19 
24 



80 
48 
29 
28 

3 
63 

I 
38 



142 

50 

29 

119 

2 

181 

23 

87 

32 

63 

47 

27 

106 

33 

95 

33 

58 

20 

103 

7 
103 
36 
56 
13 
79 
16 
73 
44 
21 
40 
39 



53 

45 

20 

38 

7 

67 

4 

54 

4 

69 

38 

122 
81 
35 

119 
8 
96 
18 
73 
50 
67 
77 
25 

118 
65 

118 
46 
82 
23 
86 
13 
73 
38 
92 
36 

131 
26 

109 

41 

40 
57 



44 

46 

17 

41 

6 

55 

8 

56 

12 

73 

35 

101 

108 

4i 

98 

10 

43 

29 

60 

109 

84 

119 

27 

85 

85 

126 

25 

67 

30 

64 

16 

57 

36 

103 

31 

127 

45 

119 

85 

55 

53 

75 



38 
65 
36 
43 
16 
45 
26 
33 
II 
70 
63 
140 
103 
93 
84 
17 
33 
54 
29 
129 
82 
168 
31 
45 
115 
79 
40 
47 
41 
42 
21 
32 
39 
85 
42 
98 
42 
102 
75 
46 
93 
85 



24 
73 
40 
43 
23 
34 
28 
18 
26 
21 
93 
79 
92 
117 
73 
26 
23 
86 
29 
107 
79 
160 
49 
36 
156 
69 
35 
33 
47 
35 
21 
40 
29 
53 
65 
71 
67 
59 
63 
36 
79 
45 



28 
84 
56 
45 
27 
27 
24 
10 
28 
21 
38 
69 
77 
124 
52 
58 
29 
86 
18 
63 
59 
98 
36 
26 
93 
44 
31 
25 
39 
27 
36 
24 
37 
3i 
40 
44 
85 
41 
30 
34 
56 
28 



24 

9 
29 
25 
46 
57 
17 
36 

6 
55 

8 
45 
26 
32 
35 

5 
5i 
29 



19 
16 
11 
9 
13 
16 
20 
13 
37 
16 
19 
22 
33 
19 



16 
36 

5 
21 

7 
36 

3 
20 
IS 
25 
17 



14 



48 

10 

38 

5 

2S 
24 



14 
24 

6 



9 

17 

13 

6 

13 

5 

4 

5 

3i 

6 

15 



166 
22 
42 
18 
48 
14 
25 
43 
10 
46 



26 
10 

2 

17 
15 
14 



4 

14 

21 

6 

33 

3 

20 
7 
74 
10 
62 
44 
41 
98 
6 
271 
24 
98 
23 
75 
45 
52 
54 
24 
83 
23 
50 
22 
46 
9 
95 
19 
22 
17 
18 
15 
50 
23 
23 
13 
28 



409 

463 

306 

319 

167 

362 

155 

272 

244 

479 

429 

913 

716 

762 

736 

668 

767 

591 

470 

730 

663 

864 

393 

S84 

793 

714 

391 

446 

379 

470 

272 

462 

321 

556 

314 

662 

430 

642 

446 

327 

492 

415 



227 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Scarlet Fever, Former New York City, by Months. 



Year. 



u 

§ 

>-> 


u 

a 
3 

.5 

<u 
ft 




< 




V 

a 
3 
1— > 


1-1 


| 

< 


u 

s 


107 


77 


86 


73 


72 


52 


66 


55 


20 


95 


107 


103 


126 


131 


113 


75 


27 


25 


80 


86 


78 


83 


no 


86 


99 


55 


49 


116 


100 


114 


80 


78 


81 


58 


5i 


52 


71 


66 


49 


55 


60 


46 


34 


14 


15 


65 


80 


100 


134 


108 


99 


56 


26 


25 


105 


93 


95 


120 


92 


102 


68 


54 


52 


III 


96 


no 


97 


93 


87 


57 


54 


35 


251 


225 


254 


186 


159 


119 


90 


36 


50 


34 


33 


25 


38 


46 


30 


20 


27 


24 


178 


176 


150 


185 


194 


139 


152 


108 


95 


403 


401 


337 


291 


234 


154 


69 


44 


26 


80 


65 


94 


95 


129 


87 


37 


27 


28 


S3 


60 


64 


68 


68 


54 


48 


21 


25 


72 


73 


77 


77 


7i 


53 


35 


16 


4 


59 


43 


42 


49 


44 


19 


25 


15 


n 


46 


41 


54 


55 


56 


55 


33 


21 


30 


109 


116 


123 


'136 


US 


138 


84 


79 


66 


221 


208 


249 


.229 


150 


69 


30 


9 


12 


47 


41 


58 


36 


32 


37 


24 


14 


15 


88 


115 


100 


169 


155 


121 


118 


64 


42 


145 


134 


138 


132 


144 


92 


33 


20 


24 


58 


69 


79 


86 


85 


53 


33 


19 


n 


44 


66 


70 


78 


64 


67 


34 


18 


15 


68 


65 


78 


59 


53 


46 


15 


13 


10 


74 


53 


37 


41 


46 


26 


25 


9 


12 


39 


5i 


50 


Si 


5i 


58 


36 


14 


22 


88 


66 


78 


56 


7i 


48 


35 


9 


10 


39 


41 


52 


34 


39 


41 


15 


7 


9 


32 


64 


46 


47 


34 


15 


17 


n 


9 


55 


61 


102 


106 


100 


64 


43 


19 


8 


82 


82 


70 


80 


99 


70 


45 


20 


16 


46 


52 


67 


73 


57 


40 


26 


13 


10 


79 


84 


73 


81 


66 


34 


20 


n 


7 


42 


42 


5i 


36 


35 


22 


7 


2 


3 


21 


23 


32 


19 


37 


14 


11 


6 


7 


21 


3i 


42 


5i 


57 


61 


36 


22 


13 


88 


122 


136 


168 


112 


73 


35 


12 


10 


44 


44 


53 


47 


76 


43 


23 


8 


9 


73 


95 


89 


84 


71 


44 


16 


7 


9 


29 


44 


74 


89 


74 


42 


21 


6 


7 


16 


46 


63 


80 


61 


44 


20 


12 


4 



Totsl. 



1871. ■ 
1872.. 
1873.. 
1874- • 
1875.. 
1876.. 
1877.. 
1878.. 
1879.. 
1880. . 
1881.. 
1882. . 
1883.. 
1884. . 
1885.. 
1886.. 
1887.. 
1888.. 
1889. . 
1890. . 
1891. • 
1892. . 
1893.. 
1894.. 
1895.. 
1896. . 
1897-. 
1898. . 
1899. . 
1900. . 
1901. . 
1902. . 
1903- ■ 
1904. . 
1905. . 
1906. . 
1907.. 
1908. . 
1909. . 
1910. . 
1911. . 
1912. . 



47 
47 
7i 
48 
20 
33 
60 
60 
3i 
54 
125 
26 
32 
19 
14 
18 
44 
65 
19 
12 
SO 
27 
15 
15 



32 

16 

9 



65 
65 

102 
45 
33 
74 
60 

102 
41 

119 

I4S 
37 
35 
50 
24 
23 
55 

112 
17 
40 
73 
36 
14 
30 
16 
28 
42 
13 
15 
8 
33 
19 



71 
76 

146 
56 
51 
91 
82 

197 
35 

168 

317 
44 
35 
78 
43 
23 
99 

188 
29 
52 

125 
52 
29 
40 
35 
31 
54 
33 
31 
24 
32 
28 
47 
31 
n 
24 
44 
27 
29 
16 
14 
9 



791 
990 
1,045 
879 
SI4 
891 
983 
1,099 
1,477 
618 
1,964 
2,066 
744 
608 
559 
371 
589 
1,361 
1,242 
408 
1,220 
977 
551 
541 
468 
402 
500 
523 
332 
315 
635 
635 
465 
534 
271 
212 
421 
801 
408 
523 
415 
368 



228 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Deaths from Small-pox, Former New York City, by Months. 



Year. 



Total. 



1871- . 
1872. . 
I873-- 

*i874- 
1875-. 
1876.. 
1877.. 
1878- . 
1879.. 



1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 



1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893- 
1894- 
1895- 
1896. 
1897- 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 



24 
IOS 
39 

4 
ISO 

72 



9 
35 



64 

ios 

22 

7 

121 

72 



65 



6 

7 

27 

4 



32 
39 



115 

116 

7 

11 

101 

50 

4 



44 

51 

3 



14 



37 
28 



no 
149 

6 

28 

104 



52 

3 'J 

5 



38 
38 



97 
185 

17 

34 
180 

26 



77 

26 

4 



5 

26 



5 

1 
62 



27 

178 

26 

3 



67 



71 
39 



3 

34 

157 

9 



3-' 

6 



80 

15 



57 

14 

I 

34 

■65 

3 



4 
30 



35 
4 



■13 
42 



44 

S<> 
4 



36 
31 
6 
78 
64 



70 

33 

2 

140 

68 

3 



19 

45 



80S 
029- 
117 
484 

1,280 

315 

14 

2 

2S 

31 

451 

259 

12 

24 
31 
99 
81 



8r 
102 
154 



24 
1 

18 

12 
399 
218 

3 



* Vaccinating Corps organized September 27, 1874. 



229 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Whooping Cough, Former New York City, by Months. 



Year. 



Total. 



1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874- 
1875- 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893- 
1894- 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905- 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
.,911. 
1912. 



17 
84 
14 
26 
49 
37 
23 
25 
67 
33 
IS 
39 
25 
22 
28 
70 
32 
25 

53 
46 
52 
22 
39 
19 
27 
33 
22 
13 
25 
34 
10 
29 
24 
4 



14 
95 
22 
38 
43 
56 
30 
18 
61 
24 
19 
44 
32 
26 
27 
69 



53 

42 
36 
16 
64 
24 
30 
16 
27 
23 
32 
38 
12 
37 
16 
10 
18 
5 



74 
35 
43 
40 
46 
39 
20 
91 
25 
19 
76 
25 
23 
35 
87 
16 
29 
83 
36 
43 
21 
90 
29 
33 
44 
38 
42 
28 
34 
14 
30 
12 
15 
25 



24 
36 
36 
44 
35 
18 
59 
22 
16 
72 
31 
32 
26 
71 



30 
47 
33 
65 
39 
48 
50 
36 
37 
20 
38 
II 

47 
16 
11 
38 



13 



27 
64 
19 
28 
31 
36 
24 
35 
54 
20 
13 
67 
27 
44 
24 
44 
12 
26 
67 
26 
40 
26 
55 
27 
30 
5i 
24 
38 



37 

24 
9 
26 
19 
17 
13 
33 
IS 
29 
25 



15 
43 
14 
38 
31 
18 
26 
35 
40 
26 
17 
56 
19 
28 



40 

53 
46 
25 
25 
35 
16 
44 
33 
22 
3S 
28 



39 
15 
9 

19 
14 

28 



24 



26 
33 
23 

47 
42 
25 
55 
44 
32 



75 
36 
64 
49 
60 
25 
70 
57 
61 
18 
52 
45 
26 
69 
51 
29 
74 
42 
3i 
13 
44 
8 
15 
29 
18 
16 
15 
31 
30 
26 
19 



53 

25 
27 
59 
3i 
46 
68 
50 
25 
23 
36 
75 
43 
55 



24 
81 
61 
57 
21 
58 
44 
34 
64 
50 
29 
66 
44 
27 
23 
39 
22 
13 
34 
33 
34 
16 

34 
21 
26 
24 



81 
24 
26 
57 
37 
33 
61 
44 
37 
23 
37 
56 
28 
72 
56 
37 
22 
82 
41 
50 

21 

31 

34 
14 
60 
49 
25 
44 
36 
21 
13 
37 



17 
26 



2S 



25 

46 
25 

21 

39 
43 
27 
21 
30 
33 
21 
51 

35 
30 

8 
60 
33 
37 
19 
32 
19 
18 
39 
26 
27 
24 
24 
16 
13 
15 
10 

5 
13 
27 

9 



25 
14 



49 
9 

18 
35 
19 
24 
16 
24 
23 
18 
29 
35 
16 
42 
36 
13 

7 
41 
28 
26 
13 
29 
16 

6 



66 



36 

23 
20 
24 
26 
21 
17 
33 
30 
14 
31 
76 



70 

33 
30 

17 
26 

36 
20 
3 r ' 
IS 
19 

21 
2S 
13 
16 



465 
565 
268 
489 
407 
406 
440 
382 

537 
277 
286 
658 
317 
490 
495 
575 
188 
573 
647 
487 
352 
371 
542 
272 
496 
435 
308 
442 
350 
318 
159 
385 
187 
120 
239 
202 
201 
123 
254 
177 
256 
176 



230 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Deaths from Diphtheria and Croup, Former New York City, by Months. 



Year. 



Total. 



1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
187S 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
188s 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
190 1 
1902 
1903 
1904 
100S 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 



83 
105 
151 
201 
321 
350 
108 
197 
143 
142 
328 
323 
180 
128 
178 
252 
321 
310 
269 
156 
156 
214 
239 
350 
219 
208 
162 
91 
97 
143 
130 
122 
128 
147 
100 
107 
109 
133 
127 
121 
91 
6l 



63 

94 
144 
172 
272 
298 
120 
*54 
113 
149 

254 
248 
140 
147 
209 
236 
263 
248 
254 
176 
185 
182 
198 
260 
175 
187 
133 
108 

85 
151 

99 
119 
103 
130 

95 
127 
109 
135 
123 
Il6 

87 

78 



74 

99 
116 
163 
269 
271 
134 
175 
108 
135 
288 
289 
153 
131 
190 
236 
285 
308 
277 
188 
194 
202 
241 
278 
190 
158 
167 
nr 

98 
131 
136 
100 
120 
126 

79 
141 

77 
146 
132 
132 
101 

73 



68 
67 
115 
177 
251 
210 
116 
144 
67 
149 
273 
234 
149 
147 
181 
196 
271 
213 



166 

229 

193 

275 

187 

146 

159 

94 

95 

137 

137 

129 

120 

178 

100 

116 

96 

143 

119 

131 

95 

61 



52 
76 
108 
134 
215 
222 
ios 

121 
78 
130 
271 
226 
140 
145 
l8l 
198 
323 
289 
247 
167 
131 
203 
206 
336 
204 
192 

195 

88 

94 

152 

123 

106 

132 

143 

95 

119 

94 

103 

92 

119 

112 

73 



35 

54 

116 

127 

243 

154 

71 

98 

66 

114 

289 

179 

114 

136 

177 

194 

275 

221 

206 

141 

133 

121 

204 

272 

171 

165 

164 

56 

99 

106 

117 

99 

108 

110 

65 

79 

107 

82 

80 

96 

61 

54 



29 

39 

124 

132 

201 

96 

84 

65 

44 

133 

257 

126 

96 

100 

iSi 

193 

181 

183 

137 

125 

134 

158 

188 

212 

155 

126 

127 

69 

82 

82 

70 

' 87 

95 

73 

62 

65 

86 

68 

68 

73 

48 

46 



35 

51 

123 

135 

173 

95 

65 

61 

60 

140 

236 

102 

114 

109 

117 

153 

125 

145 

no 

92 

III 

106 

146 

159 

137 

104 

94 

39 

74 

58 

55 

66 

66 

62 

50 

20 

60 

38 

35 

53 

44 

32 



41 

90 
176 
133 
220 

97 
121 

76 

69 
182 
227 

79 
115 

97 
135 
133 
190 

97 
100 

85 

139 

12s 
148 
142 
ios 
105 
89 
41 
53 
42 
59 
45 
67 
65 
43 
27 
52 
46 
45 
34 
19 
25 



63 

124 

223 

253 

283 

161 

161 

119 

122 

307 

283 

137 

136 

209 

155 

254 

228 

132 

123 

112 

176 

158 

214 

170 

112 

87 

85 

67 

86 

56 

78 

64 

72 

59 

46 

41 

62 

46 

50 

40 

43 

34 



160 

24S 

320 

,299 

142 

175 

144 

173 

373 

268 

149 

151 

237 

213 

314 

279 

174 

122 

160 

209 

191 

279 

204 

145 

127 

107 

7i 

104 

103 

97 

89 

88 

55 

47 

69 

63 

66 

91 

65 

48 

53 



80 
162 
242 
312 
340 
181 
163 
152 
150 
346 
313 
162 
165 
252 
293 
336 
315 
233 
157 
195 
236 
217 
302 
212 
176 
158 
108 
88 
118 
115 
126 
116 
133 
124 
78 
72 
100 
91 
103 
54 
52 
64 



704 
1,121 
1.883 
2,259 
3.087 
2,277 
1.423 
1,506 
1. 193 
2.300 
3.287 
2,254 
1.653 
1,838 
2,180 
2,695 
3.056 
2,553 
2,291 
1,783 
1,970 
2,106 
2.558 
2,870 
1,976 
1.763 
1.590 
923 
1,085 
1,276 
1,227 
1. 142 
1.232 
1,272 
860 
983 
1,015 
1.097 
1, 06s 
1.034 
801 
654 



231 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Pulmonary Tuberculosis, Former New York City, by Months. 



Year. 



a 

3 
C 


>> 
u 

c« 

2 
■8 


43 


a 


403 


375 


407 


343 


390 


434 


388 


354 


40s 


313 


340 


356 


386 


374 


428 


358 


350 


415 


356 


337 


361 


391 


355 


417 


417 


389 


408 


402 


375 


412 


494 


424 


468 


456 


437 


479 


463 


440 


553 


412 


432 


470 


475 


450 


530 


490 


412 


521 


522 


438 


486 


412 


445 


588 


445 


430 


48s 


797 


512 


476 


468 


378 


521 


468 


415 


511 


412 


402 


567 


421 


389 


438 


489 


464 


502 


460 


415 


466 


422 


459 


406 


387 


358 


443 


493 


475 


514 


440 


442 


509 


529 


440 


492 


412 


430 


468 


502 


481 


494 


453 


487 


553 


485 


449 


580 


502 


487 


560 


546 


540 


625 


531 


556 


554 


493 


468 


574 


512 


496 


580 


543 


514 


564 


521 


531 


585 









Xt 




u 

<D 


u 

<d 


CD 

c 

3 
>— 1 




i 

3 
< 


a 



X> 



O 

O 


E 

<d 

> 




i 

Q 


292 


347 


306 


328 


345 


308 


359 


310 


351 


345 


319 


346 


324 


373 


300 


295 


307 


333 


318 


343 


335 


270 


284 


322 


331 


364 


344 


385 


274 


325 


309 


317 


333 


303 


362 


309 


373 


324 


347 


358 


337 


34° 


297 


338 


323 


318 


341 


329 


345 


345 


354 


384 


342 


393 


374 


403 


301 


346 


286 


334 


367 


389 


38l 


351 


385 


380 


376 


408.2 


399 


459 


357 


407 


396 


428 


465'! 


477 


462 


376 


443 


383 


400 


464 


404 


440 


363 


450 


396 


371 


406 


409 


473 


416 


406 


419 


397 


467 


470 


466 


376 


401 


415 


415 


439 


380 


397 


423 


439 


443 


374 


432 


459 


478 


411 


390 


386 


404 


425 


419 


438 


3Si 


413 


408 


350 


461 


398 


451 


376 


422 


440 


422 


412 


384 


520 


368 


428 


413 


424 


400 


394 


440 


344 


387 


399 


421 


414 


407 


435 


363 


407 


362 


389 


360 


364 


427 


394 


393 


418 


333 


386 


367 


424 


366 


395 


381 


350 


358 


384 


420 


365 


389 


442 


401 


450 


412 


419 


409 


364 


404 


408 


383 


326 


396 


363 


392 


420 


390 


444 


369 


397 


376 


423 


379 


410 


413 


437 


476 


394 


416 


416 


353 


410 


433 


434 


420 


423 


399 


370 


427 


386 


427 


421 


410 


410 


398 


428 


412 


381 


401 


404 


366 


357 


434 


394 


385 


374 


391 


406 


379 


409 


418 


473 


397 


439 


436 


382 


416 


444 


420 


449 


427 


416 


440 


444 


465 


490 


486 


460 


479 


428 


486 


467 


515 


476 


451 


442 


383 


443 


456 


537 


468 


477 


417 


465 


449 


468 


499 


508 


451 


414 


392 


434 


462 


506 


424 


435 


444 


450 


444 


411 


505 


434 


417 


451 


430 


451 


438 


450 


448 


410 


440 


371 


423 


421 


467 



Total. 



1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
i»77 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 



371 
380 
385 
375 
428 
344 
357 
353 
393 
394 
484 
491 
493 
447 
475 
5il 
504 
520 
426 
418 
508 
516 
554 
368 
458 
468 
400 
416 
465 
527 
477 
436 
482 
550 
531 
510 
606 
559 
595 
555 
566 
552 



345 
359 
371 
350 
333 
339 
342 
355 
332 
365 
450 
474 
473 
433 
443 
495 
437 
463 
417 
422 
478 
451 
474 
388 
414 
495 
38i 
439 
435 
508 
435 
406 
454 
534 
502 
520 
525 
488 
531 
500 
536 
479 



4.186 
4.274 
4.134 
4.034 
4.172 
4.194 
4.044 
4,466 
4.343 
4.706 
5.312 
5.247 
5.290 
S.235 
5.196 
5,477 
5,260 
5,260 
5.179 
5.492 
5.i6o 
5.033 
5,124 
4.6S& 
5.205. 
4.994 
4.843- 
4.957 
5,238 
5,278 
5.233 
4,893 
5,263 
5,511 
5.67& 
5.900 
6,030 
5.931 
5,828 
5.756 
5.794 
5.648 



232 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Deaths from Cancer, Former New York City, by Months. 



Year. 



1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 



a 

CI) 

1-1 


c3 

s 


28 


20 


30 


34 


40 


29 


41 


33 


36 


30 


32 


36 


40 


39 


44 


47 


44 


42 


45 


54 


66 


58 


7S 


48 


SO 


52 


58 


57 


55 


68 


53 


73 


82 


49 


7S 


67 


58 


5i 


92 


61 


60 


63 


76 


83 


63 


80 


78 


75 


99 


78 


97 


96 


107 


118 


90 


83 


96 


88 


135 


133 


149 


114 


116 


100 


165 


12s 


143 


134 


145 


132 


156 


154 


158 


153 


162 


162 


174 


171 


177 


192 


200 


156 


205 


204 



35 
31 
32 

37 
45 

37 

4a 

51 



26 
26 
35 
39 
40 
27 
38 
45 
50 



67 


55 


44 


60 


63 


66 


56 


SO 


74 


65 


67 


46 


78 


62 


59 


70 


80 


89 


76 


68 


80 


78 


102 


79 


90 


82 


92 


89 


86 


92 


86 


86 


9i 


103 


105 


88 


ios 


107 


112 


114 


120 


133 


142 


124 


123 


130 


153 


147 


157 


137 


165 


169 


142 


160 


204 


167 


175 


163 


165 


175 


209 


177 


195 


183 


208 


201 




!►* 



s 


cj 

g 

3 
<—> 


J*. 

1—1 


1 
3 
< 


B 

X> 

S 

<u 

0. 
g 
03 


u 

Xi 

O 


O 


u 
g 

a 
p 
> 




u 

V 

.0 
6 

B 



p 


34 


20 


34 


24 


26 


24 


40 


24 


44 


37 


26 


34 


34 


29 


32 


35 


3i 


32 


50 


38 


45 


30 


29 


34 


38 


32 


30 


32 


36 


40 


31 


27 


36 


40 


38 


33 


37 


29 


34 


26 


42 


45 


36 


36 


40 


34 


37 


57 


41 


33 


46 


52 


40 


38 


39 


47 


48 


55 


56 


41 


58 


46 


40 


39 


44 


47 


57 


57 


50 


41 


43 


49 


62 


55 


61 


49 


52 


50 


56 


S3 


73 


60 


46 


59 


56 


70 


55 


59 


51 


68 


69 


57 


53 


67 


52 


63 


71 


63 


57 


62 


57 


51 


58 


Si 


69 


61 


61 


61 


46 


53 


61 


65 


62 


69 


66 


60 


56 


68 


69 


68 


6s 


70 


62 


67 


49 


69 


64 


67 


63 


80 


68 


73 


66 


92 


56 


74 


78 


78 


46 


62 


73 


84 


64 


74 


72 


72 


77 


85 


68 


73 


70 


78 


102 


80 


78 


72 


81 


65 


79 


86 


81 


60 


65 


68 


81 


86 


59 


98 


82 


8r 


87 


85 


84 


86 


83 


77 


86 


66 


98 


96 


70 


84 


77 


92 


85 


89 


104 


93 


69 


79 


79 


93 


74 


68 


106 


IOS 


81 


95 


67 


85 


93 


94 


93 


101 


79 


93 


105 


96 


109 


83- 


98 


114 


88 


113 


95 


99 


no 


101 


120 


113 


98 


US 


117 


IOI 


106 


120 


112 


in 


101 


119 


118 


124 


122 


121 


119 


125 


121 


119 


122 


103 


140 


147 


147 


in 


117 


125 


122 


137 


168 


127 


124 


138 


US 


117 


136 


142 


128 


140 


147 


141 


124 


132 


123 


158 


153 


113 


131 


146 


174 


I4S 


159 


148 


143 


ISO 


157 


143 


141 


164 


166 


159 


144 


136 


161 


167 


159 


157 


147 


173 


154 


180 


172 


161 


156 


180 


159 


188 


170 


153 


175 


178 


IS7 


182 


167 


176 


179 


191 


169 


162 


153 


212 


163 


209 


188 


176 


177 


195 


187 


205 


177 


178 


211 


176 


193 


229 


191 


238 


196 


208 


219 


189 


211 


213 


178 


206 


212 


251 



Total. 



335 

392 

42S 

416 

424 

459 

495 

570 

572 

659 

706 

732 

678 

731 

754 

779 

832 

870 

848 

9S4 

902 

996 

993 

1.022 

1,030 

1,141 

1,217 

1,260 

1,321 

1,473 

I.S7S 

1.536 

1,683 

1,740 

1.834 

1.856 

2,032 

2,020 

2,123 

2,238 

2,376 

2,497 



233 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Bronchitis, Former New York City, by Months. 



Year. 



Total. 



1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874- 
187S. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879- 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894- 
189S. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. , 
1907., 
1908. , 
1909-. 
1910. . 
1911. . 
1912. . 



93 
95 
122 
III 
149 

120 
P5 

119 
159 
106 
166 
218 
155 
158 
157 
203 
218 
191 
182 
391 
174 
221 
l8l 
175 
229 
142 
100 
112 
134 
137 
112 
153 

88 
135 
104 
112 
47 
42 
58 
63 
41 
45 



101 
123 
in 
no 

139 

127 
130 
130 

122 
I69 
I69 
132 
131 
180 
178 
168 
200 
217 
190 
127 
179 
135 
156 
195 
131 
124 
135 
123 
I69 
97 
119 
97 
129 
93 
90 
61 
28 
49 
SO 
39 
37 



97 
135 
107 
127 
137 
178 
129 
142 
145 
140 
153 
188 
183 
148 
210 
190 
206 
227 
234 
229 
195 
206 
241 
128 
180 
179 
125 
147 
no 
177 
115 
104 

93 
137 
no 
116 
49 
34 
56 
52 
43 
42 



89 
134 
no 
108 
no 
107 

94 
123 
114 
138 
159 
152 
174 
137 
163 
127 
180 
181 
159 
201 
333 
195 
229 
136 
167 
177 
109 

102 
105 
145 
IO4 
103 
96 
113 
105 

73 
35 
40 
73 
43 
40 
31 



101 

87 

98 

94 

93 

81 

72 

113 

95 

131 

120 

167 

145 

124 

137 

119 

159 

168 

133 

163 

179 

185 

134 

97 

126 

125 

103 

90 

88 

85 

69 

92 

91 

85 

74 

58 

42 

20 

56 

27 

40 

32 



59 

64 

54 

52 

55 

65 

59 

67 

63 

102 

93 

103 

79 

84 

105 

88 

109 

120 

107 

116 

120 

125 

80 

103 

86 

67 

77 

55 

68 

43 

49 

40 

49 

59 

62 

39 

32 

27 

22 

26 

23 

16 



53 
59 
54 
47 
57 
58 
50 
57 
64 
43 



59 
79 
93 
85 
81 

in 
96 
94 
82 

106 
68 
62 
66 
58 
51 
45 
53 
39 
27 
43 
37 
51 
45 
38 
35 
21 
23 
15 



52 
38 
58 
51 
44 
82 
42 
49 
51 
82 
69 
67 
68 
78 
76 
76 
98 
97 
104 
98 
82 
57 
76 
63 
70 
80 
54 
50 
46 
32 
43 
51 
37 
33 
43 
23 
24 
15 
28 
25 
19 
14 



69 

57 
44 
67 
69 
63 
56 
69 
71 
78 
86 
76 
77 
75 
89 
IOI 

132 

III 

105 

96 

107 

107 

82 

71 
74 
72 
72 
72 
66 
36 
44 
61 
S3 
60 
35 
25 
25 
20 
34 
30 
16 



Si 
73 
56 
76 
PO 



95 
III 
112 
106 
92 
87 
118 

93 

142 

151 

144 

120 

121 

124 

104 

93 

95 

118 

88 

86 

9i 

101 

69 

68 

71 

53 

67 

52 

48 

16 

19 

41 

23 

19 

24 



81 
80 
114 
101 
90 
99 
90 
122 
126 
126 
135 
133 
no 
160 
124 
164 
142 
IS8 
129 
136 
117 
132 
101 
107 
144 
76 
83 
90 
124 
84 
74 
93 
76 
79 
69 
45 
28 
28 
37 
50 
42 
28 



101 
117 
128 
120 
107 
133 
in 
98 
134 
195 
174 
140 
166 
193 
178 
228 
194 
184 
228 
152 
196 
137 
157 
136 
181 
97 
105 
138 
114 
77 
132 
90 
89 
96 
72 
53 
41 
30 
77 
53 
50 
28 



964 
1,040 
1,068 
1.065 
1, in 
1,214 
1.033 
1. 184 
1,263 
1.375 
I.5II 
I.S83 
1. 435 
1.485 
I.605 
1. 701 
1.838 
1,892 
1,814 
1.987 
1,836 
1.754 
1,577 
1,329 
I.636 
I.292 
1,089 
1,127 
1. 132 
1.093 

934 
1,020 

859 
1,044 

864 

720 

435 
324 
554 
457 
390 
334 



234 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Deaths from Pneumonia, Former New York City, by Motiths. 



Year. 



43 

o 

a 


< 






c 
3 


"3 
1-1 


a 
3 
< 


u 



! 


C 









213 


188 


170 


94 


79 


63 


108 


157 


316 


264 


228 


124 


89 


si 


87 


134 


280 


248 


269 


155 


116 


109 


ios 


146 


279 


323 


242 


160 


no 


97 


107 


128 


364 


278 


26s 


149 


138 


113 


135 


174 


370 


282 


241 


149 


114 


105 


118 


156 


278 


243 


194 


US 


105 


108 


109 


154 


306 


249 


222 


143 


84 


103 


106 


141 


330 


274 


214 


126 


103 


92 


114 


171 


266 


375 


340 


163 


127 


108 


134 


205 


391 


393 


282 


176 


151 


134 


157 


200 


453 


393 


464 


234 


169 


103 


135 


191 


S26 


472 


345 


213 


133 


122 


127 


182 


349 


304 


268 


186 


167 


150 


156 


209 


587 


512 


337 


229 


150 


139 


149 


l60 


506 


374 


256 


184 


176 


160 


125 


258 


394 


466 


390 


164 


137 


119 


205 


260 


648 


426 


409 


222 


175 


168 


203 


335 


534 


508 


352 


229 


147 


161 


205 


270 


487 


465 


412 


276 


205 


223 


196 


285 


646 


1,112 


563 


352 


237 


208 


242 


296 


685 


69I 


711 


385 


301 


255 


254 


340 


1,089 


1,082 


653 


359 


252 


223 


234 


287 


525 


512 


425 


314 


230 


206 


224 


286 


618 


68l 


541 


311 


231 


268 


267 


366 


739 


803 


522 


284 


257 


218 


298 


340 


627 


489 


401 


303 


228 


236 


259 


358 


560 


536 


496 


317 


264 


244 


309 


376 


580 


556 


478 


324 


293 


231 


298 


365 


1,117 


938 


634 


374 


297 


240 


247 


380 


724 


612 


500 


336 


245 


231 


267 


391 


659 


574 


571 


322 


285 


257 


306 


366 


742 


645 


616 


370 


321 


263 


268 


351 


1. 154 


1,119 


754 


38i 


291 


275 


281 


382 


737 


701 


553 


375 


299 


261 


237 


340 


883 


822 


668 


412 


276 


279 


314 


410 


876 


735 


623 


497 


352 


365 


315 


3S4 


708 


706 


617 


317 


245 


221 


264 


332 


842 


868 


605 


425' 


281 


237 


261 


394 


792 


720 


SIS 


380 


299 


238 


304 


367 


842 


787 


60s 


341 


272 


248 


228 


339 


717 


606 


639 


396 


298 


253 


236 


398 



Total. 



1871 
1872, 
1873 
1874. 
1875 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894- 
1895 
1896. 
1897 
1898. 
1899 
1900. 
igoi. 
1901, 
1903 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908, 
1909. 
1910. 
1911, 
1912 



227 
198 
224 
239 
410 
255 
263 
280 
34i 
261 
366 
376 
357 
348 
376 
387 
480 
460 
405 

1,111 
502 
648 
687 
680 
835 
633 
422 
497 
623 
713 
790 
859 
692 

1,011 

804 

749 
932 
712 
666 
741 
753 
651 



195 
267 
228 
245 
297 
321 
212 
247 
251 
248 
371 
370 
361 
339 
486 
354 
370 
SOS 
394 
434 
478 
609 
613 
S5i 
609 
619 
494 
543 
S84 
893 
493 
776 
745 
1,043 
684 
679 
804 
714 
607 
626 
654 
672 



148 
149 
229 
214 
225 
195 
176 
181 
268 
246 
254 
225 
240 
298 
217 
376 
347 
318 
308 
362 
508 
464 
379 
333 
449 
324 
353 
447 
438 
405 
498 
407 
548 
525 
523 
SOS 
551 
440 
526 
436 
400 
407 



192 
213 
219 
2S4 
254 
236 
191 
226 
270 
349 
386 
359 
331 
385 
308 
500 
375 
419 
562 
533 
674 
498 
629 
439 
575 
346 
451 
712 
648 
509 
70S 
459 
747 
813 
625 
685 
904 
592 
662 
747 
519 
614 



1.834 
2,150 
2,328 
2.398 
2,802 
2,542 

2,148 
2,288 

2,554 
2,822 
3.261 
3.472 
3.409 
3.159 
3.650 
3.656 
3.707 
4.288 
4.075 
4.989 
5.8l8 
5.S4I 
6.487 
4.72S 
5.751 
5.383 
4.621 
5.30T 
5.418 
6,747 
5.792 
5.841 
6,308 
8,029 
6,139 
6,682 
7,338 
5.868 
6.374 
6.16s 
5.988 
S.8S7 



235 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Diseases of Nervous System, Former New York City, by Months* 



Year. 



Total. 



1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
187S 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
189S 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904, 
1905 
1906, 
1907 
1908, 
1909 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 



227 
207 
279 
218 
209 
209 
189 
207 
245 
218 
277 
265 
229 
238 
261 
258 
261 
212 
300 
303 
282 
293 
306 
323 
316 
268 
273 
314 
311 
274 
303 
311 
299 
352 
435 
330 
331 
244 
149 
197 
228 
207 



201 

274 
227 
209 
188 
218 
178 
167 
192 
199 
269 
241 
226 
222 
281 
253 
277 
267 
303 
262 
258 
298 
300 
303 
282 
272 
291 
285 
272 
297 
24S 
327 
275 
307 
435 
345 
299 
254 
156 
162 
195 
201 



246 
350 
314 
215 
227 
222 
200 
227 
230 
229 
312 
252 
267 
267 
304 
290 
300 
286 
369 
305 
313 
372 
405 
330 
322 
324 
340 
283 
320 
348 
362 
325 
284 
415 
619 
330 
322 
306 
170 
213 
196 
175 



240 
337 
253 
210 
218 
227 
193 
206 
175 
221 

334 
273 
249 
275 
269 
293 
286 
327 
302 
313 
336 
333 
404 
315 
322 
301 
324 
300 
274 
326 
329 
349 
327 
549 
621 
404 
337 
279 
213 
174 
206 
16S 



246 
342 
234 
209 
199 
181 
218 
154 
203 
271 
276 
244 
234 
232 
256 
266 
318 
298 
289 
271 
221 
336 
348 
300 
300 
297 
259 
271 
258 
292 
306 
258 
313 
572 
500 
375 
343 
215 
191 
200 
180 
147 



215 

273 
194 
207 
196 
169 
204 
196 
213 
259 

225 
250 
213 
274 
260 
251 
292 

337 
300 
272 
333 
317 
306 
319 
310 
277 
290 
250 
270 

213 

289 

242 

257 

416 
347 
264 
285 
163 
158 
158 
153 
159 



248 
348 
257 
226 
252 
319 
260 
288 
250 
236 
270 
305 
267 
256 
311 
296 
348 
296 
322 
296 
233 
397 
353 
326 
297 
316 
283 
250 
244 
242 
326 
281 
226 
326 
312 
233 
236 
159 
132 
180 
175 
162 



252 
242 
224 
213 
219 
209 
198 
210 
194 
217 
248 
218 
205 
258 
233 
247 
263 
338 
255 
251 
315 
265 
303 
226 
292 
355 
240 
249 
242 
181 
251 
242 
216 
263 
229 
245 
244 
155 
156 
121 
140 
137 



227 
172 
204 
177 
197 
180 
186 
198 
224 
211 
221 
222 
222 
204 
253 
319 
243 
218 
260 
24S 
233 
253 
274 
238 
270 
239 
231 
203 
232 
228 
210 
266 
268 
259 
223 
143 
139 
158 
141 
131 



208 

184 

208 

193 

157 

172 

190 

176 

190 

207 

234 

194 

182 

217 

213 

240 

269 

264 

243 

246 

249 

254 

275 

238 

235 

249. 

253 

228 

242 

229 

240 

282 

272 

286 

261 

287 

277 

134 

171 

172 

141 

123 



179 
184 
166 
179 
151 
170 
170 
163 
162 
211 
215 
191 
206 
203 
242 
217 
228 
256 
257 
204 
251 
246 
236 
252 
241 
218 
228 
222 
233 
227 
232 
260 
271 
299 
246 
261 
236 
135 
171 
179 
158 
137 



206 
220 
194 
181 
197 
184 
160 
184 
205 
206 
256 
221 
228 
247 
243 
266 
278 
329 
308 
269 
290 
299 
281 
281 
238 
243 
294 
264 
293 
259 
289 
294 
291 
391 
318 
279 
280 
153 
189 
196 
154 
153 



2,656 
3. 159 
2,777 
2,432 
2,417 
2,457 
2,357 
2,358 
2,445 
2,672 
3,140 
2,865 
2,727 
2,911 
3,095 
3.08l 
3.373 
3.529 
3.491 
3,210 
3.341 
3,655 
3,750 
3,466 
3,429 
3,358 
3. 345 
3. 155 
3,190 
3,091 
3,404 
3,399 
3,241 
4.442 
4.591 , 
3,612 
3,413 
2,340 
1,995 
2,110 

2,067 

1.897 



♦Includes deaths from cerebrospinal meningitis from 1901 on. 



236 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Deaths from Bright's Disease and Nephritis, Former New York City, by Months 



Year. 



1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874- 
1875. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879- 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899- 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 



77 
72 
83 
85 
109 
86 
93 
86 
144 
107 
144 
161 
157 
148 
196 
179 
196 
189 
225 
241 
220 
211 
208 
244 
256 
269 
235 
276 
268 
326 
341 
303 
344 
347 
334 
3ii 
338 
287 
252 
297 
295 
296 



86 
75 
72 
60 
97 
III 
65 
88 
113 
106 
134 
173 
159 
168 
173 
156 
177 
208 
250 
163 
204 
205 
180 
202 
231 
260 
186 
266 
248 
312 
273 
285 
282 
337 
305 
333 
323 
308 
254 
272 
266 
289 



IOI 
99 
99 
III 
90 
130 
112 
108 
119 
87 
135 
161 
156 
164 
183 
212 
207 
238 
2l6 
219 
235 
209 
286 
221 
258 
265 
256 
278 
267 

341 
304 
295 
297 
322 
369 
344 
329 
307 
320 
293 
299 
298 



100 
113 
86 
70 
94 
106 
106 
106 
in 
127 
165 
165 
143 
170 
192 
191 
231 
197 
229 
200 
270 
231 
248 
214 
244 
231 
250 
282 
276 
293 
3io 
293 
276 
325 
310 
313 
273 
265 
269 
273 
280 
320 



102 
100 
9i 
88 
86 
92 
104 
104 
120 
123 
143 
168 
175 
164 
196 
192 
202 
233 
179 
218 
216 
218 
250 
207 
232 
223 
234 
260 
264 
288 
233 
263 
293 
304 
282 
320 
288 
253 
275 
264 
249 
248 



76 
74 
58 
81 
83 
81 
96 
101 
127 
136 
146 
146 
160 
170 
142 
216 
179 
171 
207 
198 
157 
194 
192 
222 
204 
207 
237 
257 
249 
230 
254 
239 
246 
284 
258 
241 
191 
256 
238 
184 
252 



65 
92 
106 
90 
94 
125 
114 
157 
139 
157 
177 
176 
173 
221 
188 
215 
217 
202 
211 
212 
191 
230 
225 
172 
210 
267 
264 
243 
219 
232 
291 
280 
258 
259 
217 
211 
223 
217 
240 



82 

78 
87 

86 

85 

86 

85 

99 

85 

117 

121 

146 

ISO 

141 

150 

208 



172 
194 
186 
191 
211 
178 
238 
188 
220 
274 
214 
179 
250 
214 
270 
258 
292 
226 
179 
222 
224 
172 
218 



82 
89 
7i 
77 
82 
72 
97 
76 
92 
106 
119 
146 
154 
160 
164 
186 
176 
138 
151 
162 
164 
180 
186 
156 
186 
169 
169 
207 
221 
24O 
247 
224 
205 
26l 
249 
281 
I96 
221 
184 
191 
191 
213 



79 
73 
68 
83 
85 
83 
105 
90 
102 
128 
161 
163 
155 
165 
164 
185 
188 
185 
189 
205 
196 
189 
203 
200 
228 
I89 
I89 
211 
297 
274 
292 
283 
244 
267 
308 
272 
247 
232 
232 
207 
195 
273 



77 
75 
90 
100 
93 
84 
107 
97 
120 
113 
142 
142 
153 
160 
165 
178 
175 
186 
182 
193 
176 
191 
186 
234 
223 
200 
203 
242 
275 
305 
313 
226 
280 
328 
320 
266 
239 
210 
256 
26l 
246 
278 



73 
98 
76 
92 
113 
93 
94 
117 
116 
163 
144 
146 
149 
151 
166 
212 
202 
215 
232 
213 
226 
207 
227 
207 
209 
212 
210 
272 
280 
288 
326 
303 
294 
312 
295 
370 
290 
223 
2S4 
295 
280 
319 



Total. 



1.030 
1,029 
985 
975 
1,107 
1,132 
1. 139 
1,161 
1,348 
1,418 
1,701 
1,856 
1.854 
I.928 
2,095 
2,214 
2,375 
2,342 
2,437 
2,410 
2,501 
2,395 
2.571 
2,479 
2,697 
2,685 
2.499 
2,961 
3,194 
3,394 
3,291 
3.198 
3,200 
3.610 
3.594 
3,618 
3.249 
2,893 
3,015 
3,038 
2.874 
3,244 



This table includes all acute and chronic forms of nephritis. 



237 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Heart Diseases, Former New York City, by Months. 



Year. 



9 

>— > 


s 


s 


•c 

P. 
< 


s 




a 
3 
1-1 


1—1 


1 
< 


u 

<u 
X> 

B 

<D 

ft 
0} 

CO 


u 



O 

O 


u 

<u 
Xi 

B 

> 




79 


58 


69 


80 


84 


54 


57 


60 


54 


58 


73 


95 


77 


86 


75 


84 


77 


62 


64 


57 


69 


77 


76 


56 


80 


68 


77 


75 


55 


66 


73 


67 


86 


77 


76 


63 


88 


87 


59 


63 


59 


62 


87 


7i 


102 


88 


70 


95 


85 


77 


72 


73 


67 


82 


70 


86 


74 


86 


84 


77 


76 


90 


70 


76 


94 


77 


84 


61 


99 


7i 


75 


68 


63 


61 


53 


78 


72 


106 


82 


106 


102 


86 


80 


66 


62 


91 


89 


85 


US 


137 


121 


102 


80 


93 


81 


"94 


81 


81 


102 


123 


93 


104 


99 


99 


94 


86 


81 


74 


96 


83 


134 


106 


109 


130 


134 


96 


88 


90 


102 


93 


101 


131 


102 


130 


156 


137 


121 


126 


92 


86 


in 


142 


160 


157 


146 


147 


ISO 


125 


132 


122 


118 


129 


138 


153 


130 


158 


135 


162 


129 


118 


109 


ill 


136 


160 


155 


164 


172 


183 


168 


135 


137 


126 


121 


130 


144 


183 


180 


176 


165 


154 


154 


144 


122 


119 


121 


169 


162 


178 


196 


184 


168 


143 


149 


144 


188 


149 


173 


174 


153 


176 


168 


172 


143 


139 


126 


148 


171 


163 


165 


167 


189 


158 


186 


135 


148 


151 


132 


151 


175 


184 


155 


196 


176 


194 


162 


146 


143 


122 


151 


167 


223 


142 


235 


221 


215 


177 


167 


174 


146 


200 


185 


208 


222 


232 


244 


184 


182 


191 


150 


144 


186 


177 


236 


200 


252 


229 


221 


192 


198 


175 


150 


162 


169 


212 


183 


195 


194 


191 


185 


172 


169 


160 


156 


189 


234 


199 


231 


20s 


191 


149 


169 


194 


145 


197 


168 


217 


191 


242 


215 


214 


165 


170 


165 


185 


246 


197 


234 


18S 


256 


219 


194 


162 


160 


177 


178 


197 


172 


193 


154 


168 


170 


203 


195 


143 


180 


20 r 


237 


244 


204 


218 


233 


218 


189 


137 


129 


131 


154 


181 


197 


199 


184 


222 


240 


222 


168 


155 


172 


148 


187 


166 


253 


279 


338 


292 


303 


276 


187 


195 


214 


212 


247 


334 


301 


316 


311 


307 


240 


201 


216 


186 


256 


233 


278 


268 


277 


297 


258 


243 


225 


226 


200 


249 


292 


286 


293 


297 


324 


275 


184 


207 


236 


197 


264 


285 


242 


315 


274 


287 


268 


215 


213 


207 


243 


257 


267 


290 


269 


299 


333 


301 


258 


290 


236 


273 


283 


326 


373 


350 


354 


349 


387 


341 


316 


260 


324 


356 


377 


471 


402 


384 


361 


370 


296 


308 


297 


304 


369 


374 


447 


374 


445 


439 


387 


434 


280 


315 


310 


439 


371 


465 


444 


411 


406 


404 


365 


329 


273 


334 


363 


404 


557 


464 


513 


538 


463 


36l 


376 


337 


342 


389 


465 


623 


528 


525 


479 


410 


386 


403 


346 


322 


421 


430 



Total. 



1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
I87S 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 



87 
71 
81 
91 
104 
102 
94 
113 
77 
121 
106 
143 
169 
161 
165 
107 
184 
147 
213 
182 
200 
210 
195 
164 
215 
189 
212 
291 
212 
213 
292 
232 
251 
340 
284 
348 
424 
395 
444 
541 
492 
530 



813 
894 
860 
883 
985 
992 
879 
1,068 
1,164 
1,153 
1,289 
1,477 
1,693 
1,662 
l,8oo 
1,894 
2,018 
1,880 
1,970 
1,978 
2.285 
2,330 
2,379 
2,170 
2,297 
2,396 
2,346 
2,379 
2,203 
2,276 
3,088 
3.133 
3,064 
3,188 
3,072 
3.506 
4,211 
4.331 
4,685 
4.739 
5.297 
5,403 



238 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Deaths from Puerperal Diseases, Former New York City, by Months. 



Year. 



a 

a 

oi 

1—1 


& 

2 
ft 




a 


0, 
< 







1—1 


1 

< 


C 

.a 

a 

V 
D, 

W 


29 


36 


37 


36 


45 


28 


23 


30 


15 


34 


52 


52 


52 


44 


33 


36 


45 


22 


54 


50 


55 


52 


45 


31 


23 


26 


18 


34 


47 


35 


49 


44 


37 


30 


32 


22 


39 


38 


58 


44 


30 


24 


26 


21 


17 


35 


28 


34 


34 


28 


27 


32 


21 


24 


29 


32 


42 


23 


20 


19 


21 


19 


22 


28 


25 


36 


33 


20 


32 


26 


20 


14 


30 


47 


44 


S3 


34 


22 


27 


30 


21 


40 


33 


37 


49 


42 


42 


24 


24 


27 


6i 


67 


48 


40 


36 


18 


32 


33 


25 


35 


43 


51 


50 


59 


29 


21 


29 


23 


45 


36 


5i 


39 


40 


33 


27 


26 


19 


46 


54 


56 


47 


42 


35 


29 


25 


28 


41 


33 


Si 


38 


36 


35 


44 


17 


2S 


41 


44 


46 


33 


33 


28 


26 


30 


23 


29 


37 


31 


44 


28 


30 


32 


24 


21 


30 


49 


60 


35 


37 


37 


29 


35 


25 


27 


43 


56 


52 


37 


25 


24 


32 


27 


29 


31 


40 


38 


35 


41 


29 


24 


14 


39 


49 


41 


36 


44 


42 


24 


29 


27 


52 


5i 


51 


Si 


38 


33 


30 


19 


26 


48 


32 


44 


43 


35 


28 


3i 


33 


22 


44 


35 


39 


31 


40 


34 


21 • 


22 


25 


37 


41 


42 


35 


33 


24 


40 


22 


28 


38 


44 


47 


44 


37 


31 


30 


30 


21 


39 


34 


43 


31 


32 


34 


39 


28 


26 


36 


25 


28 


36 


36 


45 


27 


29 


25 


40 


28 


44 


37 


34 


36 


29 


3i 


23 


46 


41 


61 


36 


36 


40 


30 


38 


22 


45 


41 


47 


40 


23 


28 


28 


21 


37 


38 


38 


45 


47 


38 


32 


33 


30 


29 


30 


36 


36 


39 


40 


26 


35 


23 


21 


SO 


58 


42 


62 


41 


31 


36 


30 


22 


39 


44 


52 


48 


43 


31 


39 


35 


36 


42 


39 


55 


43 


48 


33 


36 


31 


21 


37 


42 


56 


37 


41 


40 


39 


35 


18 


33 


34 


50 


41 


32 


39 


32 


27 


21 


46 


31 


48 


36 


43 


27 


49 


29 


26 


46 


43 


50 


48 


41 


43 


39 


24 


30 


39 


37 


42 


37 


54 


36 


25 


38 


30 


40 


41 


47 


46 


30 


23 


18 


31 


29 



Total. 



1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901, 
1902 
1903 
1904, 
1905 
1906, 
1907. 
1908, 
1909 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 



3" 
24 
23 
13 
18 
25 



24 
25 

IS 

2-i 



19 
32 
25 

27 
25 
25 

19 

27 
30 
28 
41 

33 

25 
24 
28 
20 
31 
23 
37 
32 
27 
33 
32 
28 
28 
25 



30 
33 

27 
17 
24 
27 
21 
28 
24 
20 
14 
28 
39 
33 
25 
25 
25 
30 
21 
43 
24 
17 
18 
16 
37 
33 
27 
26 
25 
29 
28 
27 
31 
21 
36 
26 
39 
32 
32 
20 
25 



42 

49 
23 
33 
31 
27 
29 
24 
17 
45 
27 
21 
38 
23 
26 
24 
35 
43 
24 
32 
40 
24 
31 
24 
40 
33 
29 
30 
33 
25 
35 
32 
27 
31 
45 
52 
38 
29 
31 
34 
33 
24 



381 
476 
427 
393 
370 
342 
298 
300 
359 
407 
426 
407 
416 
438 
394 
371 
355 
442 
393 
383 
420 
417 
384 
358 
409 
416 
403 
376 
385 
428 
401 
409 
375 
447 
48S 
458 
449 
403 
430 
446 
4-'4 
379 



239 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Effects of Heat, Former New York City, by Months. 



Year. 



Total. 



1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874- 
187S. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879- 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 



1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893- 
1894- 
1895. 
1896. 
1897- 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 



23 
9 



S 

13 
6 

4 
9 
6 

S 

7 

35 



9 
6 

4 

4 

65 

7 

7 

35 

29 

12 

27 

45 

5 

3 

14 
80 
10 
47 
4 

7 
4 
3 



Si 

14 



236 
24 



187 



39 
18 
79 
65 
5 
127 
23 

152 

11 

14 

29 

5 

252 
20 
78 
4 
30 
28 
75 
10 

106 

826 
14 
62 
13 

126 
27 
19 
62 
20 
52 

372 
38 



4 

63 



16 



5 
17 
13 
15 
59 
19 
10 
25 
Si 
39 



46 
5 

79 

24 
4 
3 
1 
4 

41 
4 

14 
8 
6 
6 
3 



6 
•253 



21 

320 

34 

19 

19 

206 

21 

52 

41 

116 

134 

103 

83 

107 

146 

42 

216 

96 

32 

62 

95 

320 

43 

US 

85 

765 

39 

388 

95 

20s 

898 

25 

76 

22 

134 

75 

35 

79 

79 

77 

381 

41 



240 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Deaths from Suicide, Former New York City, by Months. 



Year. 



to 

G 

B 

1-1 




1 


S 

XI 

a 

0) 


u 

XI 



O 


14 


12 


9 


12 


12 


8 


21 


11 


14 


14 


6 


4 


11 


14 


11 


19 


18 


16 


19 


10 


24 


19 


12 


12 


9 


18 


16 


is 


8 


9 


11 


18 


11 


9 


12 


12 


14 


17 


10 


11 


12 


8 


8 


7 


9 


18 


18 


9 


10 


8 


6 


16 


17 


15 


16 


19 


17 


14 


15 


14 


7 


20 


20 


13 


18 


24 


22 


14 


23 


13 


22 


18 


13 


19 


14 


19 


23 


14 


16 


12 


15 


29 


23 


19 


20 


22 


19 


14 


15 


24 


21 


22 


13 


16 


19 


21 


18 


17 


23 


14 


37 


21 


18 


22 


27 


23 


24 


30 


20 


15 


28 


26 


22 


42 


33 


27 


25 


30 


26 


40 


43 


30 


34 


20 


34 


29 


41 


34 


33 


25 


39 


42 


42 


36 


38 


45 


35 


39 


27 


39 


32 


26 


44 


40 


44 


39 


45 


41 


43 


37 


46 


41 


41 


42 


3i 


39 


39 


36 


55 


41 


55 


46 


40 


54 


40 


71 


43 


47 


39 


35 


37 


25 


24 


32 


30 


25 


34 


37 


28 


36 


32 


41 


35 


39 


32 


60 


46 


48 


54 


59 


58 


47 


31 


44 


48 


63 


54 


34 


48 


38 


33 


35 


35 


27 


47 


47 


29 


39 


36 


39 



Total. 



1871. 
1872. 
1873- 
1874- 
1875- 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
:88s. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893- 
1894- 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899- 

1900. 
1901. 
1902. 

1903. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 



14 
14 

9 



18 

22 

2S 

15 
14 

24 
25 

29 
42 

38 
39 
43 
44 
47 
32 
34 
40 
06 
49 
28 
46 
53 
46 

37 
44 



29 
3^ 
24 
33 
33 
36 
34 
23 
36 
43 
2S 
39 
35 
59 
43 
37 
37 

SO 



16 



34 
32 
22 

25 
33 
43 
44 
42 
39 
3(' 
63 
43 
44 
38 
53 
59 
06 
49 
45 



18 
13 
26 
11 
23 
24 
21 
18 
25 
33 



17 

33 
29 
26 
39 
47 
41 
42 
35 
43 
45 
59 
44 
43 
37 
6S 
53 
40 
51 
44 



24 
28 
22 
15 
33 
27 
27 
33 
35 
28 
47 
42 
37 
47 
35 
56 
5i 
57 
44 
41 
40 
53 
45 
53 
45 
52 



13 
14 
11 
17 
14 
17 
21 
24 
20 
26 
18 
17 
27 
18 
32 
38 
29 
40 
22 
35 
30 
49 
49 
35 
41 
31 
49 
52 
42 
33 
45 
42 



13 

29 
19 
28 
18 
29 
34 
37 
44 
28 
47 
40 
25 
35 
35 
38 
35 
45 
46 
49 
41 
50 
64 



114 
144 
118 
180 
ISS 
150 
148 
142 
117 
152 
166 
199 
161 
229 
207 
223 
235 
247 
244 
239 
300 
241 
3U 
33 r 
376 
384 
436 
463 
433 
500 
470 
477 
521 
567 
422 
442 
442 
644 
572 
523 
496 
531 



241 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths by Chloroform, Ether, Illuminating Gas, Railroad, Elevated Railroads, Horse, Cable 
and Electric Cars, Street Vehicles and Electric Current, in Former New York City, from 
1870 to 1912, inclusive. 



Causes of Death — 
Accidents. 



:87c 
1871. 
1872. 
1873- 
1874- 
187S. 
1876. 
1877- 
1878. 
1879- 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 



1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894- 
189S. 
1896. 
1897- 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905- 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909- 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 



Year. 



Chloro- 
form. 



Ether. 



*IUumi- 

nating 

Gas. 



Steam 
Rail- 
roads. 



16 
11 
18 
13 
27 
22 
32 
30 
36 
35 
52 
38 
31 
47 
42 
48 
60 
65 
103 
114 
154 
176 
215 
218 
139 
236 
124 
no 
142 
136 
163 



26 
24 
29 
31 



34 
38 
26 
21 
26 
27 
22 
39 
59 
58 
53 
56 
44 
48 
58 
47 
49 
39 
41 
44 
3i 
60 
30 
44 
82 
no 
99 
43 
41 
44 
38 
32 



Elevated 
Rail- 
roads. 



23 
9 



9 

14 
10 
15 
6 
4 
3 



9 

9 

7 

23 

19 

14 

33 

14 

12 

14 

3 

6 

14 

6 



Horse, 
Cable 

and 
Electric 

Cars. 



45 
52 
54 
46 
33 
31 
26 
20 

34 
24 
26 
28 
29 
24 
30 
23 
25 
21 
14 
24 
12 
47 
49 
44 
43 
47 
56 
55 
64 
91 
99 
116 
in 
97 
98 
104 
140 
160 
140 
102 
102 
75 
68 



Subway 
Cars. 



Street 
Vehicles. 



18 
37 
33 
39 
26 
30 
24 
22 
42 
35 
45 
29 
41 
35 
33 
27 
31 
39 
55 
57 
44 
54 
73 
54 
85 
100 
109 
86 
104 
118 
117 
114 
158 
189 
204 
204 
246 
264 
194 
207 
230 
303 
276 



Electric 
Current. 



* Previous to 1880 most of the deaths caused by illuminating gas were supposed to be intentional and 
were classed with suicides. Since that year the deaths believed to be accidental have been separated from 
the others. 



242 



VITAL STATISTICS. 

Deaths from Small-pox, Cholera, Yellow Fever and Hydrophobia, in New York City, from 

1804 to 1912, inclusive. 



Year. 



JSmall- 
pox. 



Cholera. 



♦Yellow 
Fever. 



tHydro- 
phobia. 



1804. 
1805. 
1806. 
1807. 
1808. 
1809. 
1810. 
1811. 
1812. 
1813. 
i8r4. 
1815. 
1816. 
1817. 
1818. 
1819. 
1820. 
1821. 
1822. 
1823. 
1824. 
1825. 
1826. 
1827. 
1828. 
1829. 
1830. 
1831. 
1832. 
1833. 
1834- 
183S. 
1836. 
1837. 
1838. 
1839. 
1840. 
1841. 
1842. 
1843. 
1844. 
184S. 
1846. 
1847. 
1848. 
1849. 
1850. 
1851. 
1852. 
1853. 
1854- 
1855. 
1856. 
1857. 
1858. 
I8S9- 
i860. 
1861. 



169 
62 
48 
29 
62 
66 
4 

H7 
21 



94 

179 

14 

19 



394 

40 

58 

149 

93 

16 

176 

224 

89 

25 

233 

351 

173 

170 

91 

69 

234 

220 

181 

119 

20 

425 

141 

53 

58s 

372 

241 

586 

516 

681 

624 

107 

396 

434 

511 

62 

289 

616 



3,513 
971 



5.071 
57 



374 

33 

2,509 

19 

8 

II 

5 

9 

18 



3 

166 



243 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Deaths from Small-pox, Cholera, Yellow Fever and Hydrophobia, in New York City, from 
1804 to 1912, inclusive. — (Continued.) 



1862. 
1863. 
1864. 
1865. 
1866. 



1869. 
1870. 
1871. 

1872. 
1873- 
1874- 
187s. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 



1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894- 
189s- 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899- 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1 90s. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 



Year. 



{Small- 
pox. 



269 

78 

394 

674 

44 

19 

26 

203 



1,280 



3i 
451 



3i 
99 
81 



81 
102 

154 



12 

399 

218 

3 



Cholera. 



9 

9 

12 

10 

1,137 

82 

9 

6 

1 

6 

4 



*Yellow fHydro- 
Fever. phobia. 



* The number of deaths from Yellow Fever in the year 1798, as reported to Mayor Varick, was 7 T 4- 
t In 1874 there was a death reported as due to Hyssophobia in addition to the 5 deaths from Hydrophobia. 
J Vaccinating Corps organized September 27, 1874. under act of Legislature passed June is. 1874- 
Note. — These diseases have been selected from the confessedly imperfect records of the years preceding 

the organization of the Health Department as being diseases of such bold characteristics and exciting so great 

public interest as to make it probable that the record of them is complete. 

244 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Marriages Reported by Months, Former New York City, since 1866. 



Year. 



Total. 



1866. 
1867. 
1868. 
1869. 
1870. 
1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874- 
187S. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 



1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894- 
1895- 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905 ■ 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 



256 

557 

569 

687 

717 

636 

723 

778 

639 

583 

610 

555 

600 

673 

766 

700 

925 

964 

1,020 

1,000 

904 

1,043 

1,246 

1,202 

1.304 

1.258 

1,196 

I t 25I 

1,187 
1,621 
1,943 
1,696 
1.763 
1,900 
1,994 
2,191 
2,487 
2,496 
2,479 
2,686 
3.082 

3,201 

2,718 
2,414 
2,528 

2,929 
2,957 



228 

493 

547 

621 

580 

640 

713 

687 

622 

579 

654 

526 

507 

589 

729 

670 

946 

783 

885 

915 

86s 

978 

1,020 

1,090 

1. 154 

1,267 

1,332 

1,271 

1,155 

1,636 

1,773 

1.636 

1,889 

L7I9 

1,880 

1,876 

2,102 

2,199 

2,407 

2,197 

2,700 

3,006 

1,965 

2,350 

2,384 

2,61s 

2,945 



229 
517 
469 
565 
734 
523 
515 
645 
611 
489 
541 
526 
637 
530 
645 
858 
820 
863 
766 
901 
1,061 
1,088 
1,019 
1,133 
1,128 

1,131 

1,334 
1,436 
1,234 
i,476 
1,429 
1. 541 
1,550 
1,406 
1,645 
1.794 
1,609 
1,928 
1,916 
2,493 
2,581 
2,402 
1,949 
2,010 
2,033 
2,27s 
2,424 



274 

636 

615 

883 

500 

654 

864 

776 

765 

724 

566 

585 

635 

664 

746 

750 

784 

1,001 

950 

957 

909 

1,090 

1,134 

1,056 

1,298 

1,470 

1,205 

1,228 

I.3I2 

I,6l4 

1,722 

1,640 

1,778 

1,714 

1,754 
1,889 
2,367 
2,335 
2,156 
1.930 
2,420 
3,027 
1,792 
2,110 
2,873 
2,570 
2,285 



461 
766 
744 
832 
702 
830 
833 
852 
806 
736 
623 
693 
665 
754 
732 
918 

1,000 

1,124 
1,114 
992 
973 
1,133 
1,262 
1,300 
1,157 
1,221 
1,272 
1,365 
1,268 
1,587 
1,464 
1,600 
1,527 
1,760 
1,712 
1,783 
1,780 
1.720 
1,94° 
2,323 
2,379 
2,494 
1,945 
1,857 
1,977 
2,315 
2,690 



523 

727 

635 

709 

804 

749 

767 

853 

781 

677 

652 

619 

684 

752 

800 

950 

980 

1,068 

1,018 

1,052 

1,058 

1,242 

I.39I 

1,332 

1,402 

1,393 

1,552 

1,645 

1,655 

2,134 

2,147 

2,121 

2.049 

2,204 

2,244 

2,424 

2,555 

2,976 

2,975 

3.255 

3.913 

3.978 

2,707 

3.173 

3.255 

3.528 

3.520 



60 1 

580 

524 

656 

590 

S83 

699 

649 

655 

649 

471 

5io 

555 

615 

618 

735 

732 

850 

966 

816 

960 

1,007 

1,047 

1,042 

1,028 

1,321 

1,154 

1,031 

1,486 

1,439 

1.455 

1,494 

1.474 

1,428 

1,840 

1.635 

2,190 

2,001 

2,183 

2,380 

2,309 

2,597 

2,044 

2,340 

2,756 

2,748 

2,432 



554 
530 
584 
608 
538 
651 
639 
606 
538 
SIS 
521 
504 
472 
515 
589 
709 
838 
809 
731 
748 
768 
1,000 

1,150 
1,019 
1,009 
995 
1,155 
1,327 
1,223 
1,462 
1,378 
1,316 
1,411 
1,513 
1,612 
1.743 
1,695 
1,947 
2,042 
2,188 
2,896 
2,794 
1.434 
1,362 
2,152 
2,450 
2,605 



604 

645 

584 

998 

628 

901 

779 

781 

723 

620 

580 

596 

670 

717 

768 

827 

927 

910 

976 

978 

1,167 

1,170 

1,164 

1,240 

1,253 

1,317 

1,298 

1,250 

1.753 

1,725 

1,448 

1,647 

1.532 

I.59S 

1,833 

1,811 

2,258 

2,306 

2,162 

2,745 

2,745 

2,791 

2,161 

2,377 

2,902 

2,636 

2,588 



767 
674 
623 
620 
662 



825 
830 
710 
735 
706 
750 
976 
882 
1,027 
1,064 
1,162 
1,253 
1,170 
1,164 
1,335 
1,492 
1,326 
1.493 
1,408 
1,315 
I,5l6 
1,650 
2,073 
1,989 
1,688 
1,891 
2,283 
2,114 
2,349 
2,117 
2,279 
2,631 
2.540 
3. 151 
3,185 
2.079 
2,581 
2,431 
-.77 1 
3.425 



683 

578 

658 

822 

1,049 

808 

863 

733 

737 

732 

594 

692 

748 

888 

857 

1.073 

1,000 

986 

1,136 

1,106 

1,321 

1,434 

1,278 

1,436 

1,313 

1,413 

L5I9 

1.284 

1,767 

2,036 

1.909 

2,119 

1,994 

1,994 

2,071 

2,311 

2,403 

2,530 

2.523 

2,523 

3.083 

3.234 

2,313 

2,727 

3.204 

3.255 



612 

441 

374 

694 

481 

777 

728 

686 

690 

548 

552 

617 

706 

773 

870 

860 

1,069 

1,036 

990 

1,081 

1,066 

1,220 

1,330 

1,224 

1.453 
1.570 
1,579 
1,540 
1,698 
1,809 
1,856 
1,867 
I,9H 
2,221 
2,228 
2,156 
2.430 
2,548 
2,551 
2,968 
3. no 
3.388 
2,476 
2,658 
2,696 
2.979 
3,477 



5.792 
7.144 ' 
6,926 
8.695 
7.985 
8,646 
9,008 
8,871 
8,397 
7.565 
7.099 
7.129 
7.629 
8,446 
9,002 
10,077 
II,085 
11.556 
II.805 
II,7l6 
12,216 
13,740 
14.533 
14,400 
14.992 

IS. 764 
16,001 
16,144 
17.388 
20,612 
20.513 
20,365 
20,769 
21,740 
22,927 
23.962 
25.993 
27.265 
27.965 
30,228 
34.369 
36.097 
25,583 
28,459 
31. 191 
32.701 
34.603 



245 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Births by Sex and Race since 1847, the First Year of Registration, Former New York City 

{Records Incomplete). 



Year. 



Total. 



Male. 



Female. 



Unknown. 



White. 



Colored. 



Not Stated. 



1847. 
1848. 
1849. 
1850. 
1851. 
1852. 
1853. 
1854- 
1855. 
1856. 
1857. 
1858. 
1859- 
i860. 
1861. 
1862. 
1863. 
1864. 
1865. 
1866. 
1867. 
1868. 
1869. 
1870. 
1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874- 
187S. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 



314 
174 



169 
96 



145 
78 



313 
173 



1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912 . 



9.287 
17,076 
13,371 
15.603 
17,680 
12,132 
8,128 
5,998 
9,869 
7,633 
6,373 
5.689 
5.332 
10,117 
12,569 
12,672 
13.947 
14.524 
20,821 
22,068 
22,683 
25,747 
23,813 
23,744 
25,569 
25.729 
25.573 
27.536 
26,130 
27.321 
28,972 
30,527 
30,030 
3L3I9 
34.023 
36,136 
37,527 
39,250 
46,904 
49,447 
51.529 
55.636 
53.731 
55.623 
54.089 
53,359 
52,068 
54.6l6 
54.013 
57,511 
62,131 
65,229 
66,862 
70,311 
74,260 
76,480 
73,173 
77,262 
78,991 
79,925 



4.899 
8,816 
6,961 
8,182 
9.063 
6,380 
4,219 
3.154 
5,072 
3.927 
3,287 
2,968 



5,202 

6,397 
6,531 
7,096 
7,56o 
10,749 
11,282 
11,707 
13,276 
12,054 
12,114 
13,074 
13,154 
13,269 
14.356 
13.359 
14,065 
14.894 
15.495 
15,524 
16,191 
17,515 
18,538 
19,269 
20,298 
23,993 
25,291 
26,451 
28,369 
27,580 
28,244 
27.538 
27,271 
26,823 
28,157 
27,492 
29,314 
31,613 
32,926 
34,176 
36,043 
38,049 
38,719 
37,500 
39,706 
40,277 
40,971 



4.379 
8,246 
6,399 
7,400 
8,602 
5,739 
3.881 
2,833 
4,748 
3.693 
3.071 
2,708 



4.905 
6,164 
6,136 
6,835 
6,910 
10,032 
10,763 
10,917 
12,387 
11,669 
11,550 
12,495 
12,575 
12,303 
13.179 
12,771 
13,253 
14,078 
15,029 
14-503 
15,127 
16,507 
17,598 
18,258 
18,952 
22,911 
24,156 
25,078 
27,267 
26,151 
27,379 
26,551 
26,088 
25,245 
26,459 
26,521 
28,197 
30,518 
32,303 
32,686 
34,268 
36,211 
37,76l 
35,673 
37,556 
38,714 
38,954 



15 
13 
2 8 

II 
49 

13 
15 
13 



9,174 

16,858 

13,210 

15,417 

17,558 

12,069 

8,080 

5,96i 

9,798 

7,607 

6,335 

5,66i 



5 
16 
54 
40 
23 
59 
84 
90 
80 



10,025 
12,405 
12,564 
13,755 
14,353 
20,595 
21,769 
22,465 
25.514 
23,559 
23,403 
25,266 
25,381 
25,236 
27,174 
25,761 
26,992 
28,617 
30,109 
29,678 
30,935 
33,661 
35.744 
37,097 
38,818 
40,331 
48,890 
50,930 
54.931 
53,027 
54.872 
53,285 
52,575 
51,273 
53,667 
53,047 
56,492 
60,976 
64,026 
65.592 
69,011 
72,852 
75,021 
71,667 
75,580 
77,240 
78,100 



112 
218 
161 
186 

122 
63 
48 

37 
71 
26 
38 
28 



87 

164 

108 

192 

169 

226 

299 

218 

233 

253 

341 

303 

348 

337 

362 

369 

329 

355 

418 

352 

384 

362 

392 

430 

432 

573 

557 

599 

705 

704 

751 

804 

784 

795 

949 

966 

1,019 

1,155 

I.203 

1,266 

1,286 

1,390 

1,452 

1,488 

1.665 

1,735 

1,806 



4 
14 
IS 

7 
18 
IT 
V, 
19 



246 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Former City of New York. 

(boroughs of manhattan and the bronx.) 

Cases of Contagious and Infectious Diseases Reported from 1874 to 191 2, inclusive. 



Year. 



1874- 
187S. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894- 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 



Croup. 



490 
530 
553 
486 
428 
306 
400 
380 
290 



Diph- 
theria. 



,684 
■521 
,47i 
,328 
.484 
.783 
,307 
,196 
,507 
,096 
.223 
,920 
,737 
923 
491 
489 
350 
874 
654 
468 
155 
925 
093 
496 
213 
920 
364 
,726 
413 
,616 
,183 
,545 
-695 
763 
911 
268 
686 
007 
925 



Measles. 



1,407 
703 
1,638 
1. 719 
2,172 
2,333 
3,891 
3,076 
4.637 
3,828 
4.395 
4.095 
5.028 
6,062 
7.279 
6.443 
9.544 
ir.980 
12,780 

7.122 

9.493 

8,203 
11,850 

9,n8 
II. 157 

8,985 
12,906 

7,962 
13.560 

7,838 
20,489 
10,761 
21,270 
11,440 
22,876 
18,480 
19,384 
16,330 
22,109 



Scarlet 
Fever. 



3.051 
1.730 
2,406 
3,475 
3,9i6 
5.446 
3.048 
7,164 
5,96l 
3.825 
3.262 
2.634 
1,696 
3.147 
7.188 
8,849 
3.087 
7.442 
7,048 
5.764 
4.768 
3.808 
4.728 
7,699 
6,680 
4.586 
4.381 

10,895 
7.724 
7.443 
8,721 
4.728 
4.634 
9,389 

14.58S 
7.070 

10,986 
8,463 
7,641 



Small- 
pox. 



1,462 

3.397 

883 

48 

5 

65 

64 

1.338 

702 

26 

5 

98 

109 

343 

311 



378 

464 

770 

4i 

5 

73 

12 

63 

143 

1,461 

917 

26 

43 

12 

48 

11 

8 

5 

14 

6 

5 



Typhoid 
Fever. 



634 

561 

607 

594 

432 

508 

901 

686 

1.393 

1,102 

974 

896 

1,004 

1,108 

1,414 

1, 100 

1,342 

1,140 

1,008 

792 

965 

1,002 

1,004 

1.535 

1,290 

1.759 

1. 945 

2,629 

2,462 

2,136 

2,194 

2,014 

2,771 

1.788 

2,015 

2,173 

2.I3S 

1.440 



Typhus 
Fever. 



56 
IS 
IS 



603 

207 

7i 

133 

84 

66 



4 

9 

241 

473 



Tuber- 
culosis. 



9.722 
11,203 
13.522 
15,036 
13.891 
13,739 
16,220 
18,478 
23.467 
17,360 
15,929 



* Including Croup since 1900. 



247 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



City and Borough of Brooklyn. 
Estimated Population on July i in Each Year, from 17QO to 1912, inclusive. 



Year. 



1790.. 
1791.. 
1792.. 
I793-. 
1794- • 
1795.. 
1796.. 
I797-. 
1798.. 
1799.. 
1800.. 
1801.. 
1802., 
1803. 
1804. 
1805. 

1806. 

1807. 

1808. 

1809. 

1810. 

1811. 

1812. 

1813. 

1814. 

1815. 

1816. 

1817. 

1S1S. 

1819. 

1820. 



Population. 



1,598 

1,662 

1.729 

1.798 

1,871 

1,946 

2,024 

2,106 

2,190 

2,279 

2,366 

2,516 

2,676 

2,846 

3.027 

3,219 

3.423 

3,641 

3.872 

4,118 

4,379 

4.251 

4,093 

3,940 

3,838 

4,254 

4.714 

5,225 

5.791 

6,418 

7,114 



Year. 



1821.. 
1822. . 
1823.. 
1824.. 
1825.. 
1826.. 
1827.. 
1828.. 
1829. ■ 
1830. 
1831. 
1832. 
1833. 
1834- 
1835. 
1836. 
1837. 
1838. 
1839. 
1840. 
1841. 
1842. 
1843. 
1844- 
1845. 
1846. 
1847. 
1848. 
1849. 
1850. 
1851. 



Population. 



7,742 
8,412 
9,140 
9,931 
10,791 
11,600 
12,469 
13,403 
14,407 
15,512 
17,001 
18,633 
20,421 
22,381 
24,529 
26,554 
28,747 
31,121 

33,691 
36,530 
40,283 
44.423 
48,988 

54,022 
59,574 
65,761 
72,591 
80,130 
88,452 
97.534 
106,279 



Year. 



1852.. 
I853-. 

1854a. 
1855.. 
1856.. 
1857.. 
1858.. 
1859- • 
i860. . 



1862. 
1863. 
1864. 
1865. 
1866. 
1867. 
1868. 
1869. 
1870. 
1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874- 
1875- 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 



Population. 



115,810 

126,195 

189,113 

206,147 

217,227 

228,901 

241,204 

254.167 

267,131 

272,836 

278,663 

284,614 

290,692 

297,814 

315,600 

334.448 

354.421 

375.588 

397.404 

413.399 

430,038 

447,347 

465,352 

483.788 

499.600 

515,927 

532,789 

550,202 

568,155 

586,365 

605,160 



Year. 



1886b. 
1887.. 



1891. . 
1892. . 
1893.. 
1894c. 
1895.. 
i8g6d. 
1897.. 



1899. 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 



Population. 



624,556 

644.574 

665.234 

695,648 

732,129 

756,727 

782,205 

808,258 

833,133 

858,772 

885.201 

952,344 

984.390 

1,023,769 

1,058,478 

1,094,365 

1,131,467 

i,i69,553 

1,205,796 

1,243,162 

1,281,686 

1,321,403 

1,363.186 

1,415.789 

1,470,420 

1,527.161 

1,586,090 

1,647,294 

1,710,861 

1,776.878 



a Williamsburg and Bushwick annexed. 
b New Lots annexed. 

c Flatbush, Gravesend and New Utrecht annexed, 
d Flatlands annexed. 

Note. — The population for intercensal years has been calculated by the geometrical 
the various annexed towns separately, as described elsewhere. 



method, that for 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



City and Borough of Brooklyn. 
Population by Census from 1790 to ipio, inclusive. 



Year. 



Population. 



Authority. 

United States Census . . . 
United States Census . . . 
United States Census. . . 
New York State Census. 
United States Census . . . 
New York State Census, 
United States Census. . . 
New York State Census, 
United States Census . . . 
New York State Census. 
United States Census. . . 
New York State Census 
United States Census . . , 
New York State Census 
United States Census . . 
New York State Census 
United States Census . . , 
United States Census. . 
New York State Census 
United States Census. . 
New York State Census 
United States Census . . 



Date. 



1790 
1800 
1810 
1814 
1820 
1825 
1830 
183S 
1840 
184S 
1850 
1855 
i860 
1865 
1870 
187S 
1880 
1890 
1892 
1900 
1905 
1910 



1.603 

•2.378 

4.402 

3,805 

7.I7S 

10,791 

15.394 

24,529 

36,233 

59,574 

96,838 

205,250 

266,661 

296,378 

396,099 

482,493 

566,663 

806,343 

957,958 

1,166,582 

1,358,891 

1.634,351 



Aug. 
Aug. 
' Aug. 
June 
Aug. 
July 
June 
July 
June 
July 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
Feb. 
June 
June 
April 15 



Note. — The population given in this table is that of the City of Brooklyn, which was not made co a- 
terminous with Kings County until 1896. 



249 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Population by Census of Various Towns Annexed to Brooklyn, from 1854 to i8g6, with 

Dates of Annexation. 





Ward. 


Date of 
Annexation. 


Population. 


Town. 


U- S. Census. 


N. Y. State 
Census. 


Estimated 
at time of 
Annexation. 




13 to 16 
17 and 18 

26 

29 

3i 

30 

32 


J- 1854 

Aug. 1, 1886 
Apr. 25, 1894 
May 3. 1894 
July 1, 1894 
Jan. 1, 1896 


1850 

1880 
1880 
1880 
1880 
1880 


34.519 

I3.6SS 
7,634 
3,674 
4,742 

3,127 


i855 

1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 


56,476 

38,541 

12,625 

8,418 

9,129 

4,234 






51,602 




23,457 


Flatbush 


1 




f 34.387 








4.749 











The intercensal population of these towns has been calculated by the geometrical method, using the census 
populations given above as the basis. 



250 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



City and Borough of Brooklyn. 

Deaths, Births, Marriages and Still-births Reported from 1866 to 1912, inclusive. 



Year. 



1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 



Deaths. 



8,683 

8,389 

8,750 

8,759 

9. S46 

10,259 

10,648 

10,968 

11,011 

12,470 

12,334 

11,362 

11.075 

11,569 

222 

533 

014 

758 

116 

369 

790 

078 

,06 r 

480 

827 

,349 

,807 

,017 

,183 

,568 

,501 

.674 

,989 

.649 

.507 



,271 
.344 
,192 
,831 
.935 
024 
043 
,938 
■365 
,676 
511 
994 



Births. 



*3,i24 
5,224 
4,802 
5.349 
4.817 
4.424 
4,216 
5.027 
7.668 
8,576 
9.723 
10,507 
10,747 
10,462 
11.975 
IO.906 
10,801 
11,050 
II.7IS 
11,588 
11,132 
12,750 
11,562 
17.075 
15.000 
16,500 
18,000 
19.250 
19.419 
20,465 
21,424 
21,109 
21,395 
21,203 
22,572 
22,182 
23,507 
27,292 
28.859 
30,972 
34,538 
38,632 
41,906 
4L494 
42,708 
45,699 
45.454 



Marriages. 



Still-births. 



*853 

1.677 

2,130 

2,461 

2,367 

2,447 

2,561 

2,520 

2,675 

2.734 

2,850 

3.047 

3.991 

3,322 

3,814 

3.948 

4,584 

4.150 

• 4.510 

4.364 

4.910 

5,700 

4.763 

9,606 

7,500 

7,500 

7,800 

7,350 

5,935 

6.779 

7,116 

7.254 

7,129 

7,612 

8,124 

8,303 

9,014 

9.616 

10,019 

10,782 

11,966 

12,916 

10,171 

11,110 

12,881 

13.748 

14.563 



1.003 
1,033 
978 
986 
819 
844 



923 
1,076 
1,011 
1.659 
1. 184 
1. 193 
1,299 
1.277 
1.279 
1.305 
1.733 
1.682 
1.550 
1.673 
1.770 
1,807 
1,919 
1,888 
1.688 
1.813 
1.776 
1.829 
1.838 
1,922 
1. 99 1 
2.071 
2,303 
2,286 
2,202 
2,221 
2.188 
2.230 



* Marriages and births were first recorded in the last eight months of the year 1866. 



251 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



Population of the Borough 



Ward. 



°"3 



Ofe 



From What Taken. 



1820. 



1825. 



1830. 



1835 



1840. 



1st . . . 
2d.... 
3do. . . 

4th .. . 
5th .. . 
6th .. . 
7th .. . 
8th& . . 
pth& . . 
I0th& . 
nth. . 
12th. . 
13th., 
14th. 
15th. 
16th. 
17th. 
18th. 
19th. 
20th. 
2 1st. , 

22d. . 
23d. . 
24th. 
25th. 
26th. 
27th. 
28th. 
29th. 
30th. 
3ISt., 

32d.. 



Total. 



1834 
1834 
1834 
1834 
1834 
1834 
1834 
1834 
1834 
1850 
1863 
1863 
1S54 
I8S4 
1854 
I8S4 
1854 
1854 
1856 
1863 



1873 
1873 

1873 



1894 
1894 
1894 
1896 



Village and Town 
* of Brooklyn. . . . 



-Town of Brooklyn 



5th Ward. 
6th Ward. 



►Williamsburg . 



Bushwick . 



7th and 13th Wards. 

5th Ward 

7th Ward 

8th Ward 

7th Ward 

9th Ward 

7th Ward 

New Lots 



2,378 



4,402 



3,805 



656 



1 8th Ward. 



Flatbush .... 
New Utrecht. 
Gravesend . . . 
Flatlands. . . . 



798 



946 
778 



5,740 



i,i59 
907 
520 

5i7 



8,303 



1,062 
970 
552 

507 



1,027 

1,009 

534 

512 



958 



1,620 



1,523 

4,674 

2,764 

5,724 

■{ 4,510 

2,139 

2,042 

487 

666 



7,655 11,187 



408 
491 



14,679 



i,i43 

1,217 

565 

596 



20,535 



1,537 

1,287 

695 

684 



32,057 



2,148 
S.447 
3,834 
6,827 
7,415 
4.043 
4,521 
944 
1,054 



5.094 



2,099 

1,283 

799 

810 



47,6l3 



Note. — Flatbush, New Utrecht, Gravesend and Flatlands were formed in 187 1; New Lots was formed 

* Inmates of institutions. Kings County at large, not included in Ward figures. 

a. Present Third Ward formed from Tenth in 1878; old Third Ward is now part of First. 

6. Present Eighth, Ninth and Tenth Wards formed in 1868; the Ninth took in part of the Twenty- 



252 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



of Brooklyn by Wards. 



1845. 


1850. 


185s. 


i860. 


1865. 


1870. 


1875. 


1880. 


United 

States 

Census, 

1890. 


X<j\v 
York 
State 
Census, 
1892. 


United 

States 

Census, 

1900. 


United 

States 

Census, 

1910. 


4,622 


6,06 


2 6,441 


6,967 


6,128 


6,476 


16,084 


18,729 


20,040 


22,784 


20,327 


21,847 


6,903 


9.35 


7 8,383 


9,8i7 


8,760 


9,117 


8,860 


9.254 


8,986 


10,529 


8,56s 


6,911 


5.936 


8,74 


8,900 


10,084 


8,890 


9.984 


15.809 


18,271 


18.754 


24.140 


17.949 


15.882 


8,819 


11.03 


2 12,282 


11,766 


11,506 


12,087 


12,616 


12,819 


12,324 


15.580 


12,568 


10,445 


9.419 


13,68 


2 l6,352 


17,400 


17,820 


20,490 


18,591 


18,517 


20,175 


19.175 


18,862 


19,415 


10,651 


H.53 


6 18,490 


22,710 


26,407 


28,296 


34.072 


35.437 


37.693 


48.939 


42.485 


46.457 


9.958 


6,37 


I 12,523 


12,096 


1 5. 968 


22,312 


26,488 


31.663 


35.726 


39,490 


40,471 


44,014 


1.369 


2,58 


5 S,3i8 


9,190 


9.829 


9,592 


12,127 


17,388 


31.239 


42.758 


52.414 


82,591 


1.897 


3.26 


1 9.133 


17.342 


23.443 


15,279 


13.643 


15.044 


17,696 


21,081 


42,876 


50,414 




11,78 


2 21,749 


25,258 


28,668 


34.592 


24,866 


27,140 


34.031 


50.318 


39.100 


4L233 




12,42 


1 22,213 


28,821 


18,242 


21.243 


21,629 


21,680 


22,693 


25.007 


22,608 


21.659 






6,990 


11,083 
17.958 


13,085 

17,791 


18,302 

18,711 


17,525 
19.547 


22,201 
21,029 


27.368 
21,628 


3L734 
24,282 


30.354 
24,029 


29,262 




1 


14,044 


30,092 


11,338 


30,780 


12,414 

- 

6,559 


15,475 
10,566 


15.425 

H.449 


20,649 
18,406 


23.925 
21,255 


25.559 
23,654 


27,246 
27.630 


32,629 
30,319 


31.483 
30,269 


33.345 
35.874 






15.350 


21,181 


24.379 


26,438 


39,206 


42,712 


45.720 


51.152 


56.550 


68,261 


1.857 


3,739 


5.508 
2,601 


7.934 
4.316 


10,234 
6,319 


17.353 
11,607 


23.998 
17,459 


30,088 
23,926 


41,424 
74.96o 


46.315 
22,267 


57.309 
25.133 


70,324 
35.759 








6,697 


8,055 
13.980 


16,321 
19.179 
27.904 
11,761 


21,908 
21,430 
24.834 
17,736 

10,005 


27,661 
24,188 
3L956 
25.473 
14.396 


36,244 
24,136 
50,118 
50,250 
29,348 


38,187 
26,120 
S7.362 
57.807 
33.292 


37.645 
25.446 
58.957 
66,575 
61,813 


44.881 








27,485 










78,726 












81,329 












65,552 














5.799 
13,081 


8,823 
19,055 


16,771 

44,638 


17.888 
56,682 


31.767 
48,328 


80,508 














63.834 








3.271 


5.009 


9,800 


11,047 


13,655 


1 

29,505 


38,541 


66,086 


177.605 


















I 


34.695 
38,882 


43.961 
77.912 


60,852 


















J 


92,608 


2,225 


3.1 


n 3.280 


3,471 


2,778 


6,309 


6,940 


7.634 


12,338 


12,625 


27,188 


73.048 


1,863 


2,1 


29 2,730 


2,781 


3.394 


3.296 


3.843 


4.742 


8,854 


9.129 


24,700 


77.II6 


898 


1,0 


>4 1.256 


1,286 


1,627 


2,131 


2,180 


3,674 


6,937 


8,418 


14,609 


29.610 


936 


1,1 


55 1.578 


1,652 


1,904 


2,286 


2,651 


3.127 


4.075 


4.234 


8.243 


17.412 


78,691 


138,8 


32 216,355 


279,122 
1 


311,090 


419.921 


509.154 


S99.495 


838,547 


/ *3.707 
\ 996.071 


| 1,166,582 


I.634.35I 



from Platbush in 1852. 
second in 189 1 



253 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



■9;^ 



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254 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



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255 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



City of 

Cases of Contagious and Infections Diseases 



Year. 



Croup. 



Diph- 
theria. 



Measles. 



Scarlet 
Fever. 



Small- 
pox. 



Typhoid 
Fever. 



Typhus. 



1873. 
1874- 
187S. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879- 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 



1890. 
1891. 
1892. 



319 
1,651 
2,669 
2,329 
2,280 
1.744 
i,8oi 
3,058 
3,218 
4,599 
1,18s 

976 
1,348 
1,602 
1,995 
2,297 
2,798 
2,241 
1,850 
1,829 



219 

2,572 

906 
2,670 
1,604 
1,225 
3,441 

923 

2,479 
674 
4.723 
1,821 
2,892 
3. 118 



930 
2,448 
1,269 
1,657 
2,930 
1,988 
2,208 
1,727 
4,554 
4,599 
3,167 
1,990 
2,288 
1.645 
1,877 
2,675 
2,668 
1,657 
2,701 
3,078 



426 

268 

2,519 

1,131 

87 

3 

6 

10 

498 

185 

12 

14 

16 

125 

215 

374 



184 



207 
214 
263 
191 



137 
143 
181 
148 
202 
194 
435 
343 
444 
394 
399 
313 
418 
243 



Reporting of measles was begun in the latter part of 1879; croup in 1S95; typhoid fever not fully reported. 
* Croup included in diphtheria since 1900. 



256 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Brooklyn. 

Reported from 1873 to ipi2, inclusive. 



Year. 



Croup. 



Diph- 
theria. 



Measles. 



Scarlet 
Fever. 



Small- 
pox. 



Typhoid 
Fever. 



Typhus. 



Tubercu- 
losis. 



1893. 
1894- 
189S. 
1896. 
1897. 



1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 



411 
319 
285 
208 
206 



1,672 
3.812 
4,276 
4,912 
3.862 
3,008 
2,688 
*3,8s6 
3.942 
4.236 
5.705 
5,026 
4.307 

5.2II 

5.398 
5.451 
4.735 
S.023 
4.492 
4.678 



2,272 
4,688 
3.438 
7,074 
4.695 
2.933 
3,098 
5. hi 
3.5H 
5.506 
4,862 

10,321 
7.0S3 

13,827 
4.509 

12,807 
9,881 

12,630 
7.728 

12,188 



2,961 
2,119 
1. 99 1 
2,471 
2,924 
2,136 
2,308 
1,878 
5.188 
3.529 
2,921 
4.037 
2,884 
2,760 
5.436 
8.123 
4.275 
6,474 
6,136 
4.321 



449 
459 



12 

410 

503 

15 

29 

34 

52 

46 

6 

3 

2 

4 

17 



216 

284 

283 

245 

312 

58l 

422 

697 

644 

961 

1,003 

1,050 

I.9I3 

I.2I5 

I.34I 

999 

1,131 

I.II3 

1,104 

1,284 



3.426 
4.339 
4.897 
5.324 
5. 157 
6,233 
6,407 
7,592 
6,066 
5,828 



257 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

Population of Borough of 



Ward. 


c 
.0 

s s 

a 
Ofe 


Formerly Known as 


1800. 


1810. 


1 8 14. 


1820. 


1825. 


1830. 


i83S. 


1840. 


1st 

2d 

3d 

4th 

Sth 


1898 
1898 
1898 
1898 
1898 










In this year the 
aggregate of the 
county alone was 
taken. 












2,312 
1,818 

I,66l 


2,437 
2,230 
2,110 


2,472 
2,271 
1,880 


2,478 
2,32s 
2,401 


2,610 
2,820 
2,376 


3.SOS 
3.643 
2.885 


5,054 
4,124 
3.781 








Total 


















5.791 


6,777 


6,623 




7,204 


7,806 


10,033 


12,959 



* Formed in 1870 from Newtown. The 
t Only part of Hempstead was consolidated with the other towns forming Greater 



Population of Borough of 



Ward. 


a 

.0 

oil 


Formerly Known as 


1800. 


1810. 


1814. 


1820. 


1825. 


1830. 


1835. 


1840. 


1st 

2d 

3d 

4th 


1898 
1898 
1898 
1898 
1898 




1,056 


1,301 


1,348 


1.527 


1,786 


2,216 


2,868 


4.275 






1.377 

932 

1,198 


1. 595 
1,007 

1.444 


1,710 

998 

1,446 


1,980 
1,012 
1,616 


1,984 
719 

1.443 


2,162 

971 

1,773 


2,297 

845 

1,681 


2.745 
1,619 
2,326 


Southfield 


Westfield 






4.563 


S.347 


5.502 


6,135 


5.932 


7,122 


7.691 


10,965 



* Formed in i860, from Castleton and Southfield. 
t Includes 126 inmates of Institutions 



City of 

Population by Census, 



Boroughs. 


1800. 


1810. 


1814. 


1820. 


1825. 


1830. 


1835. 


1840. 


1845. 


1850. 




60,489 


96.373 


9S.SI9 


123,706 


160,686 


197,112 


268,089 


312,710 


371.223 


515.547 
4.436 

138,882 
16,831 
15.061 






5,740 
5.791 
4.563 


8,303 

6,777 
5.347 


7.655 
6,623 
5.502 


11,187 

*6,9I4 
6,135 


14.679 
7,204 
5.932 


20.S35 
7.806 
7,122 


32,057 

10,033 

7,691 


47.613 
12,959 
10,965 


78,691 
13.322 
13.674 










76,S83 


116,800 


H5,299 


147.942 


188,501 


232,575 


317,870 


384.247 


476,910 


690,757 



* Arithmetical mean between previous and following census (see note to Queens' table). 

Note. The census population, as given in this table, is somewhat less than the true population of the 

to the tables for Manhattan and The Bronx and Queens. 

258 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



Queens, by Wards. 



1845. 


1850. 


1855. 


i860. 


1865. 


1870. 


1875. 


1880. 


United 

States 

Census, 

1890. 


New 
York- 
State 
Census, 
1892. 


United 

States 

Census, 

1900. 


New 
York 
State 
Census, 
1905. 


United 

States 

Census, 

1910. 














15.587 
10,614 
15,357 
8,983 


17.129 

9,804 
15.906 
10,088 


30,506 

17.549 
19.803 
14,441 


35.745 
19,776 
20,816 
17.654 


48,272 
40.903 
25.870 
30,761 
7,193 




61,763 
105,219 
37,i7i 
67.412 

12,476 


5.521 
3.918 
3,883 


7.208 

5.376 

4.247 


4.694 
7.970 
5,632 


13.725 

10,189 

6,515 


13.891 
10,813 
6,777 


20,274 
14,650 

7,745 






















13,322 


16,831 


18,296 


30,429 


3L48i 


42,669 


50,541 


52,927 


82,299 


93,991 


152,999 


198,241 


284,041 






other towns were formed in 1788. 

New York, and the population previous to consolidation cannot be given. 



Richmond, by Wards. 



1845. 


1850. 


l85S. 


i860. 


1865. 


1870. 


1875. 


1880. 


United 

States 

Census, 

1890. 


New 
York 
State 
Census, 
1892. 


United 

States 

Census, 

1900. 


New 
York 
State 
Census, 
1905. 


Unted 

States 

Census, 

1910. 


5.203 


5.389 


8.252 


6,678 
6,243 
4.841 
3.645 
3.985 


7.683 
6,866 
5,201 
4.407 
4.052 


9,504 
7,589 
5.949 
5,082 
4.905 


10,957 
8,332 
6,619 
4.426 

4,862 


12,679 
9,029 
7,014 
4,980 
5,289 


16,423 
10,557 
9,811 
6,644 
8,258 


17,261 
11,477 
9,641 
6,324 
8,648 


21,441 
13,200 
13,701 
9.516 
9.163 


23.659 
14.035 
15.347 
9.481 
10,198 


00,000 


3.343 
2,631 
2,497 


4,020 
2,709 
2.943 


4.187 
5.449 
3.501 


00,000' 

0,000 
00,000 


13.674 


15.061 


21,389 


25.392 


28,209 


33.029 


35.196 


38,991 


51,693 


53,351 


67,021 


t72,846 


8S.960. 



The other towns were formed in 1788. 
not credited to wards. 



New York. 

i8oo-iqio, inclusive. 



1855. 


i860. 


1865. 


1870. 


1875- 


1880. 


United 

States 

Census, 

1890. 


New 
York 
State 
Census, 
1892. 


United 

States 

Census, 

1900. 


New 
York 
State 
Census, 
1905. 


United 

States 

Census, 

1910. 


629,810 
12,436 

216,355 
18,296 
21,389 


813,669 
16,343 

279,122 

30.429 
25,392 


726,386 

19.024 

311,090 

31.481 

28,209 


942,292 

28,981 

419,921 

42,669 

33.029 


1,005,692 

36,194 

509,154 

50,541 

35.196 


1,164,673 
41,626 

599,495 
52,927 
38,991 


1,441,216 

74.085 

838,547 

82,299 

51.693 


U.801,739 

996,071 
93.991 
53.351 


J 1, 850.093 

[_ 200,507 

1,166,582 

152,999 

67,021 


2,112,697 

27I.02Q 
1.358,891 

198.241 

72,846 


2,331.542 
430,980 

I.634.35I 

284,041 

85.969 


898,286 


1,164.955 


1,116,190 


1,466,892 


1.636,777 


1,897.712 


2,487,840 


2.945.152 


3,437. 202' 


4.0I4.304 1 4,766,883 



territory now comprised within the limits of The City of New York, for the reasons given in the foot note 

259 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



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262 



INDEX 



A 

PAGE 

Accidents, Deaths from (see also tables under Deaths) 242 

Alcohol, Wood 36 

Ambulance calls, number of 99 

Animals 

Dead, ordered removed in 1912 34 

Inspection of 61 

Anthrax (see also Contagious Diseases) 64-70 

Antiformin Method, introduction of 74 

Appropriations and Expenditures for 19 12, Comparative Table of 19 

Asiatic Cholera (see also Contagious Diseases) 70 



B 

Bakeries, Inspection of, to Detect the Use of Unfit Eggs and Spoiled Fruits 37 

Births- 
American and Foreign Cities 116 

New York City 1 15 and 125 

New York City, according to sex, color and nativity of parents. . . . 132, 133, 172, 173 

In New York City, according to nativity of parents 171 

In former New York City from 1847-1912, according to sex and color 246 

In Manhattan, according to sex, color and nativity of parents 172 and 173 

In Brooklyn from 1866-1912 25 

(Still) New York City 1 16 and 125 

(Still) in New York City, according to sex, color and nativity of parents. . . 132 and 133 
(Still) in Brooklyn from 1866-1912 251 

Blindness Caused by Wood Alcohol 36 

Bright's Disease, Deaths from 220 and 237 

Brooklyn — 

Births from 1866-1912 25 

Births (still) from 1866-1912 251 

Contagious and Infectious Diseases from 1873-1912 256 and 257 

263 



INDEX 



>i868-I9I2 254 and 255 



Brooklyn — Continued 
Deaths — 

Bright's disease 

Bronchitis 

Cancer 

Diarrhceal diseases 

Diarrhceal diseases under 5 

Diphtheria and croup 

Malarial fever 

Measles 

Nervous diseases 

Pneumonia 

Puerperal diseases 

Pulmonary tuberculosis 

Scarlet fever 

Smallpox 

Suicide 

Sunstroke and heat 

Typhoid fever 

Typhus fever 

Violence 

Whooping cough 

Deaths in Institutions 1 79 

Marriages from 1866-1912 251 

Measles, 1868-1912, deaths and rates 254 

Population, 1868-1912 254 

Population by Ward from 1800-1910 252 and 253 

Population by Census from 1790-1910 249 

Population estimated on July 1st, in each year from 1790-1912 248 

(Former) Population 260 

Board of Health Action on Reports, Communications, Permits, Notices and Orders. . 17 
Buildings, New 17 



Cancer — 

Deaths from, in those over 15 years of age, according to age, sex, and civil con- 
dition 150 

Mortality in 122 

Deaths from, in former City of New York from 1866-19 12, according to sex 

and age 214 and 215 

Deaths from, in former City of New York from 1871-1912, according to months. 233 

Deaths from, in Brooklyn, 1868-1912 254 and 255 

Influence of marriage upon 123 

Canned Goods — 

Unfit 14 

Condemnation of 36 

Cars, deaths from accidents on 242 

Cerebrospinal Meningitis — 

Supervision of 71 

Lumbar puncture in 73 

General figures for 76 

Chicken Pox 63-70 

Number of cases found among school children 93 

Child Hygiene, staff of the Division of 80 

264 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Children Under 5 Years of Age — 

Mortality in I2 o 

Deaths from diarrhceal diseases among 122 

Chloroform, Deaths from 242 

Cholera — 

Deaths from, in City of New York from 1804-19 12 243 and 244 

(See also Contagious Diseases) 64, 70 

Circulars, New, of Instruction and Information : 

1. Cerebrospinal Meningitis. 

2. Circular of Information Regarding Acute Poliomyelitis (for the public). 

3. Circular of Information Regarding Acute Poliomyelitis (for physicians). 

4. Circular of Information Regarding Venereal Diseases. 

5. Circular of Information Regarding Immunization against Typhoid Fever. ... 71 
Clinics — 

Dental 15 

Medical for Children 15 

Tuberculosis 76 

For school children 96 

Cocaine, sale of 36 

Communicable Diseases, total number of reported 71 

Communications, action taken by Board of Health on 17 

Complaints — 

Notices and orders 1912 29 

Received by Division of Food Inspection 45 

Regarding violation of sections of code relating to milk 58 

And disposition of, relating to food and meat 45 

Conjunctivitis, number of cases found among school children 93 

Contagious Diseases, found among school children 93 

Contagious and Infectious Diseases — 

Number of, reported in City of Brooklyn 256 and 257 

Number of, reported in former City of New York from 1874-1912 247 

Contagious Diseases — 

Prevalence of, in 1908, 1909, 1910, 191 1, and 1912 63 and 64 

District medical inspection of 65-70 

Contracts 17 



D 

Day Nurseries and Institutions for Dependent Children, supervision of 90-91 

Dead and Still-born infants, disposition of, in the City of New York 180 

Death Certificates, signing of 23 

Death Rate — 

Corrected 126 

Reduction of n 

From all causes, lowest level of 120 

Deaths — 

New York City 1 1 7 and 125 

All causes (corrected) 127 

Principal causes with ages of decedents 134 and 139 

And death rates per 1,000 population, 1898-1912 160 

1909 to 1912 119 

Reported and actual 118 

Accidents and negligence 169 

265 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Deaths — Continued 

New York City — Continued 

Cancer 122 and 2 14 

Cholera 243 

Diarrhceal diseases 122, 129, 161 

Diphtheria and croup 121 

Hydrophobia 243 

Malarial fever 120 

Measles 120 

Measles (corrected) 128 

Respiratory diseases 122 

Scarlet fever 120 

Scarlet fever (corrected) 128 

Smallpox 120 

Suicide, according to sex and nativity 168 

Tuberculosis, pulmonary, in those over 15 years of age, according to sex, age 

and civil condition 159 

Tuberculosis, pulmonary, and cancer, per 1,000 population, according to 

nativity, and nativity of parents 166 

Variola 120 

Yellow fever 243 

Zymotic and certain other preventable diseases 162 and 164 

According to Cause with Meteorology in Public Institutions, arranged by weeks 

130 and 131 

Among Females from Principal Causes, according to age 148 and 155 

Among Males from Principal Causes, according to age 140 and 147 

Among infants under 1 year from All Causes, in institutions and dwellings 82 

From All Causes in those over 15 years of age, according to sex and civil condition. 159 

According to nativity and nativity of parents 165 

According to sex, color, nativity, and nativity of parents 132 and 133 

According to sex and age '. 156 and 157 

Diarrhceal diseases and all causes in infants under 1 year, arranged by weeks. . . 161 

Diarrhceal diseases, in children under 5 years of age 122 

Diarrhceal diseases in infants under 2 years of age 129 

Ellis Island — among immigrants according to sex, color and age 158 

In Institutions — 

Bronx 

Brooklyn 

Queens J- 179 

Richmond 

City of New York 

Public (arranged by weeks) 130 and 131 

Persons over 100 years of age, according to name, nativity, causes of death, date 

of death and borough 181 

Tenements, dwellings, hotels, in streets and rivers 170 

Puerperal septicaemia, investigation of 81 

Respiratory diseases (acute) 122 

Whooping cough in former City of New York from 1866-1912, according to sex 

and age 208 and 209 

Whooping cough in former City of New York from 1 871-19 12, according to 

months 230 

Brooklyn, 1866-19 12 2 5 J 

Brooklyn (see also under Brooklyn). 
Deaths and Death Rates — 

In former City of New York, age and sex since 1880 196 and 197 

266 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Deaths and Death Rates — Continued 

In former City of New York, under i year of age per 1,000 population for same 

age 198 and 199 

Per 1,000 population in former City of New York 194 and 195 

Deaths, former City of New York, accidents from 1870- 19 12 — 

Chloroform 

Ether 

Illuminating gas 

Elevated railroad 

Steam railroads \- 242 

Horse, cable and electric cars 

Subway cars 

Street vehicles 

Electric currents 

Deaths — 

Bright's disease, in former City of New York, from 1 871-19 12, according to 

months 237 

Bright's disease, in former City of New York, from 1866-19 12, according to sex 

and age 220 

Bronchitis, in former City of New York, from 1866-19 12, according to sex and age 

216 and 217 
Bronchitis, in former City of New York, from 1871-1912, according to months. . 234 

Cancer 214 and 215 

Cholera 243 

Diphtheria and croup, in former City of New York, from 1866-1912, according 

to sex and age 210 and 211 

Diphtheria and croup, in former City of New York, from 1871-1912, according 

to months 213 

Effects of heat, in the former City of New York, from 1866-19 12, according to 

sex and age 222 and 223 

Effects of heat, in former City of New York, from 1871-1912, according to 

months 240 to 242 

From heart disease, in former City of New York, from 1871-1912, according to 

months 238 

From malarial fever, in former City of New York, from 1871-1912, according to 

months 226 

From measles, in former City of New York, from 1871-1912, according to 

months 227 

From measles, in former City of New York, from 1866-1912, according to sex 

and age 202 and 203 

From diseases of the nervous system in former City of New York, from 1 871-19 12, 

according to months 236 

From pneumonia, in former City of New York, from 1866-1912, according to age 

and sex 218 and 219 

From pneumonia, in former City of New York, from 1871-1912, according to 

months 235 

From puerperal diseases, in former City of New York, from 1871-1912, according 

to months 239 

From pulmonary tuberculosis, in former City of New York, from 1871-1912, 

according to months 232 

From pulmonary tuberculosis, former City of New York, from 1866-1912, 

according to sex and age 212 and 213 

From scarlet fever, in former City of New York, from 1871-1912, according to 

months 228 

267 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Deaths — Continued 

From scarlet fever, in former City of New York, from 1866-1912, according to 

sex and age 204 and 205 

From smallpox, in former City of New York, from 1866-1912, according to sex 

and age 206 and 207 

From smallpox, cholera, yellow fever and hydrophobia, in New York City, from 

1804-1912 243 and 244 

From smallpox in former City of New York, from 1 871-19 12, according to 

months 229 

From suicide, in former City of New York, from 1871-1912, according to months 241 
From suicide, in former City of New York, from 1866-19 12, according to sex 

and age 224 

From typhoid fever, in former City of New York, from 1866-1912, according to 

sex and age 200 and 201 

From typhoid fever, in former City of New York, from 1871-1912, according to 

months 225 

Department of Health Stables, report of 61 

Diarrhceal Diseases — 

New York City, deaths from 122, 129, 161 

Brooklyn, 1868-1912 255 

Diphtheria — 

General figures for (1908-1912) 77 

Number of cases found among school children 93 

Injection, intubation, and immunization for 78 

Fatality of, reduced 74 

And croup, mortality in 121 

And croup 63 

Deaths in former City of New York from 1871-1912, according to months 231 

Cases reported from 1874-1912 247 

Disinfection 62 

Disinfection, New Regulations Regarding 60 

E 

Egg Market 14 

Eggs, Rotten 24 

Eggs and Egg Products, the Handling of 37 

Eggs, Unfit (see also Bakeries) 37 

Electricity, Deaths from 242 

Employment Certificates, Issuing of 97 

Erysipelas, Number of Cases Found among School Children 93 

Ether, Deaths from 242 



Favus, Number of Cases Found among School Children 93 

Food- 
Complaints relating to 45 

Amount of condemned in 1912 35 

Samples, summary of, obtained and results of analyses 43 and 44 

Supervision of 13 

Foodstuffs — 

Approximate amount of, arriving at New York for consumption in New York 

City during year 38 

Uncovered 14 

268 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Foundlings, Inspection and Supervision of 82 and 83 

Fruit, Fish and Other Food, Inspection and Condemnation of 40 

Fruit, Fish and Other Foods, Number of Pounds Condemned and Destroyed 42 

Fruit, Spoiled (see also Bakeries) . 37 



German Measles 64-70 

Gonorrhoea — 

Number of cases found among school children 93 

Tests made for 109 

Glanders — 

Complement fixation method for 74 

Human 64, 70 

Goods, Lots of Disinfected and Destroyed (see also Disinfection) 62 



H 

Hospitals, Division of — 

Kingston Avenue, number of cases treated at 1 04 

Reception, number of cases treated at 101 

Riverside, number of cases treated at 103 

Willard Parker, number of cases treated at 102 

Hydrophobia 64, 70 

Deaths from, in City of New York from 1804-1912 243 and 244 

Preventive treatment of 18 



Illuminating Gas, Deaths from 242 

Infants — 

Number of deaths from all causes among infants under 1 year, in institutions 

and dwellings 82 

Deaths and death rates among infants under I year of age per 1,000 population 

for same age in former City of New York 198 and 199 

Under 2 years of age, corrected mortality from diarrhceal diseases 129 

Under 1 year, deaths from diarrhceal diseases and all causes, arranged by weeks. 161 

Milk stations 13, 83, 84, 85 

Milk stations, infant mortality at 9° 

Mortality, reduction of II, 83, 87 and 123 

Mortality, all causes, and death rates per 1,000 children born 88 

Mortality, diarrhceal diseases and death rates per 1,000 children born 89 

Mortality — 

Diarrhceal diseases 

Respiratory diseases 

Congenital debility 

Contagious diseases 

All other causes 

Inspections and Condemnations of Foodstuffs, cost of 38 

269 



-1902-1912 88 and 89 



INDEX 

L 

Laboratories — ■ page 

Bacteriological, work performed at 108 

Bacteriological, experimental work at 109 

Chemical no 

Diagnosis, report of, showing number of specimens examined and results of exam- 
ination 79 

Products, sales and distribution of 18 

Serodiagnostic, established 109 

Vaccine 1 IO 

Legal Work 20 

Leprosy 64, 70 

Life Table- 
American ! 78 

Complete for City of New York 117, 177, 178 

Little Mothers' Leagues 90 

Lodging Houses, inspection of 26 

M 

Malarial Fever, mortality 226 

Marriages — 

New York City 116 and 125 

New York City, according to color, social condition, nativity and ceremony, 

174 and 175 

Former City of New York from 1866-1912, reported by months 245 

City of Brooklyn from 1866-1912 251 

Borough of Manhattan, according to color, social condition, nativity and cere- 
mony 174 and 175 

According to color, nativity and parents and social condition 132 and 133 

(See also Cancer as affected by Marriage) 123 

Measles — 

Mortality in 120 

Brooklyn, death rates, 1868-1902 254 

(See also Contagious Diseases) 7°> I2 8, 247 

Among school children 93 

German (see under German) 64, 70 

Meat — 

Cost of inspection and condemnation of 38 

Inspection and condemnation of, 1911-1912 4° 

Unwholesome 24 

Meningitis, cerebrospinal — see Cerebrospinal Meningitis 7 1 and 73 

Mid wives — 

Number of permits granted to 80 

Supervision of 80 

Work performed by 80 

Milk- 
Containers of 53 

Control of 12 and 13 

Grading of I2 

Inspection of, in City 1908-1912 54 

Inspection of, in country districts 5& 

Inspection of, outside of City of New York 57 

Inspection of, in stores and wagons 55 

270 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Milk — Continual 

Quarts of Grades A, B, C, supplied daily 53 

Pasteurization of 13, 57 

Receptacles, cleaning of 23 

Supply, reorganization of the supervision of 35 

Monographs on Tuberculosis 71 

Mosquito, Extermination and Prevention 27 

Moving Picture Exhibits 71 

Molluscum Contagiosum, among School Children 93 

N 

Night Soil, ordered removed in 19 12 34 

Notices and Orders — 

Disposed of during the year 1912 28 

Pending December 31, 1912, and when issued 28 

Nuisances — 

Public, and vacation of premises, summary of 34 

Smoke 27 



Odors — Slaughter Houses 23 

Offal— Ordered removed in 1912 34 

Ophthalmia Neonatorum, investigation of cases of 81 

Opium and Cocaine, detection of the sale of, without physicians' prescriptions 36 

Orders, action taken by the Board of Health on' 71 

Oysters, permits to keep 37 

P 

Parotitis 64, 70 

Among school children 93 

Poliomyelitis 93 

Among school children 71 a nd 73 

Pertussis 63 

Among school children 93 

Permits — 

Issued by the Board of Health 27 

Necessity of, for conducting various forms of business 49 

Number of, granted to midwives 80 

Relating to keeping and selling oysters 37 

Relating to slaughter-houses 49 

Police Department, in relation to sale of opium and cocaine 36 

Police Squad, work performed by 28 and 32 

Population — 

New York City 113 

New York City, 1900-19 10, according to returns of Federal Censuses 1 14 

New York City from 1898-1912 160 

Former New York City, by wards 193 

Former New York City, 1790-1912 188 and 189 

Former New York City from 1628-1910, with dates of censuses 192 

Former New York City, by Census, 1800-1910 190 and 191 

Former New York City, by Census, 1800-19 10, by wards 258 and 259 

271 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Population — Continued 

Former New York City, 1868-1912 160, 261, 262 

Former New York City, and annual deaths, with death rates per 1,000 popula- 
tion 194-5 

Manhattan, by wards, from 1800-1910 158 and 159 

Brooklyn, by wards, from 1800-1910 252 and 253 

Brooklyn, by Census, from 1854-1896 250 

Brooklyn, by Census, from 1790-1910 249 

Brooklyn (estimated), from 1790-1912 248 

Brooklyn, from 1868-1912 254, 255, 260, 261, 262 

Richmond, from 1800-1910 in wards 258 and 259 

Queens, from 1800-19 10 in wards 258 and 259 

Postal Card for Acknowledging Report of Contagious Diseases 60 

Premises — 

Disinfected 62 

Sanitary inspection of, where foodstuffs are manufactured, stored or sold ... 47 and 48 

Preventive Medicine, Division of 109 

Plague 7° 

Prosecutions — 

Criminal. . : 20, 21, 39, 46, 59 

Criminal, of corporations 20 

Civil 21 and 22 

R 

Records, right to examine 24 

Refuse Material, transportation of 27 

Relapsing Fever 7° 

Reports, action taken by Board of Health, on 17 

Resources, Financial, of the Department of Health 18 

Respiratory Diseases (Acute), mortality in 122 

Ringworm, among school children 93 

S 

Sanitary Inspection of Buildings and Premises 31, 39> 5° an d 5 1 

Sanatorium — 

Otisville 105 

Otisville, number of patients treated at 106 

Sausages and Preserved Meats, rules and regulations for the control of the manufac- 
ture of 35 

Scabies, among school children 93 

Scarlet Fever — 

Among school children 93 

Cases of 63, 64, 93, 247, 256 

Deaths from 120, 128, 204, 228 

School Children — 

Clinics for .' 96 

Contagious diseases found among 9 2 and 93 

Contagious diseases of the eye and skin found among 9 1 

General contagious diseases found among 93 

Medical inspection and examination of 14 an d 9 1 

Non-contagious physical defects among 94 

Special physical examination of 96 

Vaccinations performed on 93 

272 



INDEX 

PAl.E 

Searches and Transcripts Made iy > 124, 127 

Slaughter-houses 23, 49 

Smallpox — 

Mortality in l2 o 

See also 206 to 207, 243 and 244, 247 

Sputum, antiformin method of examination -1 

Stables, inspection of 26 

Stables, Department of Health r, 1 

Still Births 12c 

City of Brooklyn from 1866-1912 251 

City of New York 1 ! 5 

City of New York, according to sex, color and nativity of parents 132-3 

Supplies, Requisitions and Accounts, Bureau of 71 

Syphilis, Tests made for IO g 

(See also Venereal Diseases.) 



Table Waters . 



T 





14 

Bacteriological examination of, revealing pollution 37 

Tetanus 64 70 

Trachoma — 

Studies in I0 g 

Among school children 03 

Tuberculosis 7 1 , 247 

Clinics 76 

Relief committees 72 

Day camps 72 

Hospital Admission Bureau 72 

Among school children 93 

General figures of, from 1908-1912, inclusive 74 

Pulmonary, mortality corrected 129 

Mortality, effect of marriage upon 121 

Pulmonary, mortality in 121 

(See also Deaths.) 

Typhoid Fever — 

To be reported by hospitals 73 

Cases reported from 1874- 19 12 247 

Immunization against 1 ^ 

Supervision of 15 and 7 1 

Mortality in 120 

Number of examinations of blood and urine for 74 

General figures for 77 

Typhus Fever (see also Contagious Diseases) 7.1 

Cases reported from 1874-1912 247 



V 

Vaccinations — 

Number of performed, and certificates issued 62 

Number of performed on school children 93 

Varicella 63, 70 

2 73 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Venereal Diseases — 

To be reported by public institutions 73 

See Syphilis and Gonorrhoea 16 

Control of 71 

Visiting, District 86 

W 

Weather, Annual Meteorological Summary 1912 182 and 187 

Whooping Cough (see also Contagious Diseases) 63, 70 

Mortality in 121 

Mortality in former City of New York 208 and 209 

Among school children 93 

Wood Alcohol — 

Detection of, in certain brands of liquor causing blindness 36 

Detection of, in paregoric and spirits of lavender 36 

Work, Experimental ! 109 

Y 

Yellow Fever 70 

Deaths from, in City of New York from 1804-1912 243 and 244 



274